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" And therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the shows of things to the desires of the mind ; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind unto the nature of things. "
Studies in English prose: specimens, with notes, by J. Payne - Pagina 130
geredigeerd door - 1868
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General introduction to a course of lectures on English grammar and composition

Henry Rogers - 1838 - 131 pagina’s
...some satisfaction to the mind of man in those points wherein the nature of things doth deny it — to raise and erect the mind by submitting the shows of things to the desires of the mind." That it is defective, he himself virtually admits in his "De Augmentis," which was merely an...
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On the Philosophy of the Mind

James Douglas (of Cavers.) - 1839 - 387 pagina’s
...serveth and conferreth to magnanimity, morality, and delectation. And therefore it was even thought to have some participation of divineness, because...it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the shews of things to the desires of the mind ; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind unto the nature...
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Essays; or, Counsels civil and moral, and the two books Of the proficience ...

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1840
...serveth and conferreth to magnanimity, morality and to delectation. And therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because...nature and pleasure, joined also with the agreement and c,msort it hath with music, it hath had access and estimation in rude times and barbarous regions,...
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Literary Leaves, Volume 2

David Lester Richardson - 1840
...serveth and conferreth to magnanimity, morality and delectation ; and therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because...it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the show3 of things to the desires of the mind ; whereas reason doth humble and bow the mind unto the nature...
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Literary Leaves; Or, Prose and Verse Chiefly Written in India, Volume 2

David Lester Richardson - 1840
...it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because it doth raise and erect ttie mind, by submitting the shows of things to the desires of the mind ; whereas reason doth humble and bow tlie mind unto the nature of things. — Lord iiacon. What does even the stern and severe...
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The Dublin University Magazine: A Literary and Political Journal

1841
...serveth and confernth to magnanimity, morality, and to delectation. And, therefore, it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because...pleasure, joined also with the agreement and consort it hath had with music, it hath had access and estimation in rude times and barbarous regions, where...
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A Discourse of the Baconian Philosophy

Samuel Tyler - 1844 - 178 pagina’s
...serveth and conferreth to magnanimity, morality and delectation. And therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because...buckle and bow the mind unto the nature of things." This admirable delineation of the objects and nature of poetry, sounds doubtless, in the ears of those...
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The North American Review, Volume 59

Jared Sparks, Edward Everett, James Russell Lowell, Henry Cabot Lodge - 1844
...serveth and conferreth to magnanimity, morality, and to delectation. And, therefore, it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because...submitting the shows of things to the desires of the mind." Now, Wordsworth, whether he appears to sing of the past or the present, is, in reality, singing...
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Proceedings, Volume 9

Royal Society of Edinburgh - 1878
...— that is to say, didactic. It is with a covert sneer that he says : — " Poesy was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because...buckle and bow the mind unto the nature of things." He divides poetry into Narrative, Representative, and Allusive. In speaking of Representative poetry...
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The Poets and Poetry of England, in the Nineteenth Century

Rufus Wilmot Griswold - 1845 - 504 pagina’s
...last, longest, and best of his productions, Italy. Lord BACON describes poetry as " having something of divineness, because it doth raise and erect the...mind ; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind to the nature of things." This is perhaps the most philosophical description that has been given of...
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