Zoeken Afbeeldingen Maps Play YouTube Nieuws Gmail Drive Meer »
Inloggen
Boeken Boek
" And therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the shows of things to the desires of the mind ; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind unto the nature of things. "
Studies in English prose: specimens, with notes, by J. Payne - Pagina 130
geredigeerd door - 1868
Volledige weergave - Over dit boek

George Grant and the Subversion of Modernity: Art, Philosophy, Politics ...

Arthur Davis - 1996 - 346 pagina’s
...serveth and conferreth to magnanimity, morality, and to delectation. And therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because...mind; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind to the nature of things. And we see that by these insinuations and congruities with man's nature and...
Gedeeltelijke weergave - Over dit boek

Dictionary of Quotations

Connie Robertson - 1998 - 669 pagina’s
...have casually escaped the shipwreck of time. 678 The Advancement of Learning Poesy was ever thought tter to John Taylor If poetry comes not as naturally...height of enthusiasm I have been cheated into some fine 679 The Advancement of Learning The knowledge of man is as the waters, some descending from above,...
Gedeeltelijke weergave - Over dit boek

Einheit, Abstraktion und literarisches Bewusstsein: Studien zur ...

Philipp Wolf - 1998 - 345 pagina’s
...according to revealed providence (Bacon 1963, III, 343). Und deshalb, so Bacon weiter, it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because...it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the shews of things to the desires of the mind; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind unto the nature...
Gedeeltelijke weergave - Over dit boek

The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations

Oxford University Press, TME. - 1999 - 1136 pagina’s
...shipwreck of time. The /Uiwimrmeni of learning ( iftosl bk. 2, ch. 2, sect, i 1 1 Poesy was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting ihe shows of things to the desires of the mind; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind unto the...
Gedeeltelijke weergave - Over dit boek

The Cambridge Companion to Eighteenth-Century Poetry

John Sitter - 2001 - 298 pagina’s
...poetry in terms that might a century later seem somewhat high-flying. Poetry is above reason for Bacon "because it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting...reason doth buckle and bow the mind unto the nature of things."10 Bacon's noble identification of poetry with what Freud might have regarded as the pleasure...
Gedeeltelijke weergave - Over dit boek

Francis Bacon and the Transformation of Early-Modern Philosophy

Stephen Gaukroger, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy Stephen Gaukroger - 2001 - 249 pagina’s
...serveth and conferreth to magnanimity, morality, and to delectation. And therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because...it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the shews of things to the desires of the mind; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind unto the nature...
Gedeeltelijke weergave - Over dit boek

Gothic Writing, 1750-1820: A Genealogy

Robert Miles - 2002 - 244 pagina’s
...apparent difficulty. In putting pleasure above use poetry is sui generis: it 'submits the shews of things to the desires of the mind: whereas reason...buckle and bow the mind unto the nature of things'." Poetry serves the pleasure principle, and even making allowances for the more austere inflections 'pleasure'...
Gedeeltelijke weergave - Over dit boek

The Major Works

Francis Bacon - 2002 - 813 pagina’s
...the mind, by submitting the shews0 of things to the desires of the mind; whereas reason doth buckle0 and bow the mind unto the nature of things. And we see that by these insinuations0 and congruities with man's nature and pleasure, joined also with the agreement and consort0...
Gedeeltelijke weergave - Over dit boek

Emerson's Life in Science: The Culture of Truth

Laura Dassow Walls, John H Bennett Jr Chair of Southern Letters Laura Dassow Walls, Laura Dassow - 2003 - 280 pagina’s
...some participation in divineness, because it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the shews of things to the desires of the mind; whereas reason...buckle and bow the mind unto the nature of things." In Nature, Emerson dramatizes Bacon's assertion: the poet "unfixes the land and the sea, makes them...
Gedeeltelijke weergave - Over dit boek

Knowledge and Indifference in English Romantic Prose

Tim Milnes - 2003
...the argument from inspiration is, in this context, unsurprising: poetry, he notes, 'was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because...it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the shews of things to the desires of the mind; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind unto the nature...
Gedeeltelijke weergave - Over dit boek




  1. Mijn bibliotheek
  2. Help
  3. Geavanceerd zoeken naar boeken
  4. ePub downloaden
  5. PDF downloaden