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" And therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the shows of things to the desires of the mind ; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind unto the nature of things. "
Studies in English prose: specimens, with notes, by J. Payne - Pagina 130
geredigeerd door - 1868
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The British Controversialist and Literary Magazine

1859
...serveth and conferreth to magnanimity, morality, and delectation ; and therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because...and erect the mind by submitting the shows of things unto the desires of the mind ; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind unto the nature of things....
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The Definition of Poetry: An Essay

Horace Peters Biddle - 1873 - 29 pagina’s
...in his writings, rather describes the effect of poetry than gives it a definition; for he says that it "doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the shows of things to the desire of the mind." This remark is profound and accurate, but it is scarcely a correct definition...
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Divisions on a Ground: Essays on Canadian Culture

Northrop Frye - 1982 - 199 pagina’s
...it, the world being in proportion inferior to the soul . . . And therefore (poetry) was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because...it doth raise and erect the Mind, by submitting the shews of things to the desires of the Mind, whereas reason doth buckle and bow the Mind unto the Nature...
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Samuel Johnson & the Impact of Print

Alvin B. Kernan - 1989 - 357 pagina’s
...serveth and conferreth to magnanimity, morality, and to delectation. And therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because...buckle and bow the mind unto the nature of things. In Ephraim Chambers' Cyclopaedia (1728)—which Johnson knew well in connection with his Dictionary,...
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Ceremony and Civility in English Renaissance Prose

Anne Drury Hall - 2010
...poetry and prose or between poetic prose and prosaic prose. Poetry, says Bacon, is like "inspiration" because it "doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting...mind; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind into the nature of things" (Advancement, 343-44). In the essay "Of Fame," Bacon assaults the language...
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Terms of Response: Language and the Audience in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth ...

Robert L. Montgomery - 2010
...original I quote the Pleiade ed. Poetry, according to Bacon, may delude us, "submitting the shews of things to the desires of the mind; whereas reason...buckle and bow the mind unto the nature of things." 13 And to underscore the fairly widespread disposition in the seventeenth century to court a sense...
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The Historical Renaissance: New Essays on Tudor and Stuart Literature and ...

Heather Dubrow, Richard Strier - 1988 - 377 pagina’s
...image which is more satisfying than the imperfections of nature. Therefore poetry "was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because...it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the shews of things to the desires of the mind; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind unto the nature...
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The Discipline of Taste and Feeling

Charles Wegener - 1992 - 224 pagina’s
...serveth and conferreth to magnanimity, morality, and delectation. And therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because...reason doth buckle and bow the mind unto the nature of things.3 Here is suggested a relation of the imaginative functioning of the mind to the world the paradigm...
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Renaissance Poetics/Renaissance-Poetik

Heinrich F. Plett - 1994 - 440 pagina’s
...Learning noch deutlicher: "[...] it [ie poesy] doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the shews of things to the desires of the mind; whereas reason...buckle and bow the mind unto the nature of things." (Ill, 343 f.) Obwohl Bacon solches nicht direkt expliziert, ist zu vermuten, daß seine Sympathie der...
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George Grant and the Subversion of Modernity: Art, Philosophy, Politics ...

Arthur Davis - 1996 - 346 pagina’s
...serveth and conferreth to magnanimity, morality, and to delectation. And therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because...mind; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind to the nature of things. And we see that by these insinuations and congruities with man's nature and...
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