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" Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters of their fates : The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and Illustrations of ... - Pagina 14
door William Shakespeare - 1809
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The Art of Elocution: Or, Logical and Musical Reading and Declamation. With ...

George Vandenhoff - 1847 - 383 pagina’s
...general shout ! I do believe, that these applauses are For some new honors that are heap'd on Csesar. Cos. — Why; man, he doth bestride the narrow world,...Colossus ; and we, petty men, Walk under his huge legs, and peep about, To find ourselves dishonorable graves. Men at some times are masters of their...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1847
...such a feeble temper9 should So get the start of the majestic world, And bear the palm alone. [Shotit. Flourish. Bru. Another general shout ! I do believe,...applauses are For some new honours that are heap'd on Cresar. Gas. Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under...
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Greatness: Who Makes History and why

Dean Keith Simonton - 1994 - 502 pagina’s
...In the play, one of the aspiring tyrannicides, Cassius, addresses Brutus in lines of memorable envy: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. So Cassius, Casca, Cinna, Trebonius, Ligarius,...
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Shakespeare and the Geography of Difference

John Gillies - 1994 - 255 pagina’s
...o' th' world' (3.1.49-50), and in Julius Caesar, where Caesar is explicitly imagined as a Colossus: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. (1.2.136-9) The reappearance of this type...
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Everybody's Shakespeare: Reflections Chiefly on the Tragedies

Maynard Mack - 1993 - 279 pagina’s
...BRUTUS: I do believe that these applauses are For some new honors that are heaped on Caesar. CASSIUS: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs and peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves. (1.2.133) In the famous forum speeches this...
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Die Semantik der musiko-literarischen Gattungen: Methodik und Analyse : eine ...

Ulrich Weisstein - 1994 - 276 pagina’s
...Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. During the second scene of the first act he hears Cassius say to Brutus: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world like a Colossus; and we petty men walk under his huge legs, and peep about to find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters of their...
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Shakespeare and the Mannerist Tradition: A Reading of Five Problem Plays

Jean-Pierre Maquerlot - 1995 - 197 pagina’s
...strange eruptions are. 1, iii, 76-8 A 'colossus' who destroys all hope of honour in his fellow citizens: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. His tyranny, more moral than political,...
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Where Thousands Fell

William J. Leonard, Williams J. S. J. Leonard - 1995 - 346 pagina’s
...are museums, in one of them a statue of Constantino, now in fragments, so huge it recalled the lines, Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs and peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves. The other parts of the museum would not...
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Shakespeare's World of Death: The Early Tragedies

Richard Courtney - 1995 - 268 pagina’s
...his attack until, at Brutus' reaction to another offstage shout, Cassius' voice rises to the fury of: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. (134-137) This great metaphor is stark,...
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The History of American Art Education: Learning about Art in American Schools

Peter Smith - 1996 - 252 pagina’s
...they spoke to Cizek without the need of translators, including Eugenia Eckford. 10 A Colossus of Sorts Why, man. he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs and peep about The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves, that we are underlings....
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