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The Sophy. A Tragedy. Actions of the last age are like Almanacs of the last year.

EDMUND WALLER.
1605-1687.
Verses upon his Divine Poesy.
The soul's dark cottage, battered and decayed,*
Lets in new light through chinks that time has made.
Stronger by weakness, wiser men become,
As they draw near to their eternal home.

Upon the death of the Lord Protector.
Under the tropic is our language spoke,
And part of Flanders hath received our yoke.

On a Girdle.
A narrow compass! and yet there
Dwelt all that's good, and all that's fair!
Give me but what this ribbon bound,

Take all the rest the sun goes round.

Go, lovely Rose.
How small a part of time they share
That are so wondrous sweet and fair;

* Drawing near her death, she sent most pious thoughts as harbingers to heaven; and her soul saw a glimpse of happiness through the chinks of her sickness-broken body.

Holy and Profane State. Book i. ch. ii. — Fuller.

To a Lady singing a song of his composing.
The eagle's fate and mine are one,

Which, on the shaft that made him die,
Espied a feather of his own,

Wherewith he wont to soar so high.

MARQUIS OF MONTROSE.

1612-1650.

Song, "My Dear and only Love."
I 'll make thee famous by my pen,
And glorious by my sword.

WILLIAM BASSE.

1613-1648. On Shakespeare. Renowned Spenser, lie a thought more nigh To Learned Chaucer, and rare Beaumont lie A little nearer Spenser, to make room For Shakespeare in your threefold, fourfold tomb.

FRANCIS BEAUMONT.

1585-1616. Letter to Ben Jonson. What things have we seen Done at the Mermaid! heard words that have been So nimble and so full of subtile flame, As if that every one from whence they came Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest, And resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life.

GEORGE WITHER

1588-1667.
The Shepherd's Resolution.
Shall I, wasting in despair,

Did because R woman 's fair?
Or make pale my cheeks with care,

'Cause another's rosy are?
Be she fairer than the day,
Or the flow'ry meads in May,

If she be not so to me,

What care I how fair she be?'

* Shall I like a hermit dwell
On a rock or in a cell,
Calling home the smallest part
That is missing of my heart,
To bestow it where I may
Meet a rival every day?
If she undervalue me
What care I how fair she be.

Attributed to Sir Walter Raleigh.

THOMAS CAREW.
1589-1639.

Disdain Returned.
He that loves a rosy cheek,

Or a coral lip admires,
Or from star-like eyes doth seek

Fuel to maintain his fires;
As old Time makes these decay,
So his flames must waste away.

Conquest by Flight.
Then fly betimes, for only they
Conquer love, that run away.

FRANCIS QUARLES.
1592-1644.

Emblems. Book ii. 2.
Be wisely worldly, but not worldly wise.

Book ii. Epigram 10. This house is to be let for life or years; Her rent is sorrow, and her income tears; Cupid 't has long stood void; her bills make known, She must be dearly let, or let alone.

GEORGE HERBERT.

1593-1632.

Virtue.
Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright,
The bridal of the earth and skies.

Only a sweet and virtuous soul,
Like seasoned timber, never gives.

The Answer.
Like summer friends,
Flies of estates and sunnen shine.

The Elixir.

A servant with this clause
Makes drudgery divine;

Who sweeps a room as for thy laws,
Makes that and the action fine.

The Church Porch.
A verse may find him who a sermon flies,
And turn delight into a sacrifice.

Dare to be true, nothing can need a lie;

A fault which needs it most, grows two thereby.

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