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religion. Her head rested on her mother's breast, and her sisters knelt on each side, whilst Miriain, her faithful nurse, who had now joined the solemn group stood near her.

“ You will give me to God, mamma ?” she whispered, when her mother's tears fell on her cheek.

“Yes, my own love," said her mother, “if it be His blessed will." - Clare's sobs were audible.

“Tell her it is God's pleasure : that she must not weep, for I shall soon be with Him for ever and for ever. Kiss me, dear, dear mother. Where is Gwenthlean ?bless you all —all. God bless themmamma-Gwenthlean-Mr. Lloyd-Herbert--Clare-Miriam-all.”

The little girl ceased to speak. She appeared to fall into a sweet sleep. Motionless they remained around her, and the silence of the tomb was in the little chamber. She breathed softly, and with her gentle breathing, the hectic flush came and

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religion. Her head rested on her mother's breast, and her sisters knelt on each side, whilst Miriain, her faithful nurse, who had now joined the solemn group stood near her. . “You will give me to God, mamma ?” she whispered, when her mother's tears fell on her cheek.

“Yes, my own love," said her mother, “if it be His blessed will." - Clare's sobs were audible.

“Tell her it is God's pleasure : that she must not weep, for I shall soon be with Him for ever and for ever. Kiss me, dear, dear mother. Where is Gwenthlean ?bless you all-all. God bless themmamma-Gwenthlean-Mr. Lloyd-Herbert--Clare—Miriam-all.”

The little girl ceased to speak. She appeared to fall into a sweet sleep. Motionless they remained around her, and the silence of the tomb was in the little chamber. She breathed softly, and with her gentle breathing, the hectic flush came and

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went. Fainter and fainter was its hue. First like the rose in her summer glory, then in hof autumn blush, then as when the first frost bath touched her. They watched the colour fade, thus gradually from her cheeks, until again hér éye unclosed, and turned upwards. Her lips moved, and she murmured a few faint words. The lamp flickered on the table ; for it had been long untrimmed. A wavering light, a hissing sound, and it was extinguished. The bright winter moon gleamed serenely through the half closed curtains. Softly and tenderly her rays reposed upon the face of the dying child that face now pale as the lily. The breathing had ceased to be audible. The head had sunk back. The clasped hands had relaxed. One groan from the bereaved parent told that the pure spirit had left its frail earthly dwelling-place, and was seeking a home with saints and angels, in the full light of the mansions of its God.

CHAPTER V.

The wise and active conquer difficulties
By daring to attempt them : sloth and folly
Shiver and shrink at sight of toil and hazard,
And make the impossibility they fear.

Rowe.

Worse than idle is compassion

If it end in tears and sighs ;
Thee from bondage would I rescue,

And from vile indignities;
Nurtured, as thy mien bespeaks, in high degree,
Look up-and help a hand that longs to set thee
free.

WORDSWORTH.

WHEN Herbert Llewellen was left in the bandits' cave by his fellow-countryman,

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