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schulle understonds that Machamete was born in Arabye, that was first a pore knave that kept cameles, that wenten with marchantes for marchandise." Knave for boy, and wenten for went are the two chief differences-the one in the use of words, the other in grammar-that distinguish this piece of Mandeville's English from our modern speech.

10. The English of the Sixteenth Century.—This, which is also called Tudor-English, differs as regards grammar hardly at all from the English of the nineteenth century. This becomes plain from a passage from one of Latimer's sermons (1490-1555), "a book which gives a faithful picture of the manners, thoughts, and events of the period." "My father," he writes, "was a yeoman, and had no lands of his own, only he had a farm of three or four pound a year at the uttermost, and hereupon he tilled so much as kept half a dozen men. He had walk for a hundred sheep; and my mother milked thirty kine." In this passage, it is only the old-fashionedness, homeliness, and quaintness of the English-not its grammar-that makes us feel that it was not written in our own times. When Ridley, the fellowmartyr of Latimer, stood at the stake, he said, "I commit our cause to Almighty God, which shall indifferently judge all." Here he used indifferently in the sense of impartially—that is, in the sense of making no difference between parties; and this is one among a very large number of instances of Latin words, when they had not been long in our language, still retaining the older Latin meaning.

11. The English of the Bible (i).—The version of the Bible which we at present use was made in 1611; and we might therefore suppose that it is written in seventeenth-century English. But this is not the case. The translators were commanded by James I. to "follow the Bishops' Bible"; and the Bishops' Bible was itself founded on the "Great Bible," which was published in 1539. But the Great Bible is itself only a revision of Tyndale's, part of which appeared as early as 1526. When we are reading the Bible, therefore, we are reading English of the sixteenth century, and, to a large extent, of the early part of that century. It is true that successive generations of

printers have, of their own accord, altered the spelling, and even, to a slight extent, modified the grammar. Thus we have fetched for the older fet, more for moe, sown for sowen, brittle for brickle (which gives the connection with break), jaws for chaws, sixth for sixt, and so on. But we still find such participles as shined and understanded; and such phrases as "they can skill to hew timber" (1 Kings v. 6), "abjects" for abject persons, "three days agone" for ago, the "captivated Hebrews" for "the captive Hebrews," and others.

12. The English of the Bible (ii).—We have, again, old words retained, or used in the older meaning. Thus we find, in Psalm v. 6, the phrase "them that speak leasing," which reminds us of King Alfred's expression about "leasum spellum" (lying stories). Trow and ween are often found; the "champaign over against Gilgal" (Deut. xi. 30) means the plain; and a publican in the New Testament is a tax-gatherer, who sent to the Roman Treasury or Publicum the taxes he had collected from the Jews. An "ill-favoured person" is an ill-looking person; and "bravery" (Isa. iii. 18) is used in the sense of finery in dress. Some of the oldest grammar, too, remains, as in Esther viii. 8, "Write ye, as it liketh you," where the you is a dative. Again, in Ezek. xxx. 2, we find "Howl ye, Woe worth the day!" where the imperative worth governs day in the dative case. This idiom is still found in modern verse, as in the well-known lines in the first canto of the "Lady of the Lake":

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"Woe worth the chase, woe worth the day
That cost thy life, my gallant grey !"

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CHAPTER V.

MODERN ENGLISH.

1. Grammar Fixed.-From the date of 1485—that is, from the beginning of the reign of Henry VII.—the changes in the grammar or constitution of our language are so extremely small, that they are hardly noticeable. Any Englishman of ordinary education can read a book belonging to the latter part of the fifteenth or to the sixteenth century without difficulty. Since that time the grammar of our language has hardly changed at all, though we have altered and enlarged our vocabulary, and have adopted thousands of new words. The introduction of Printing, the Revival of Learning, the Translation of the Bible, the growth and spread of the power to read and write-these and other influences tended to fix the language and to keep it as it is to-day. It is true that we have dropped a few oldfashioned endings, like the n or en in silvern and golden; but, so far as form or grammar is concer cerned, the English of the sixteenth and the English of the nineteenth centuries are substantially the same.

2. New Words.-But, while the grammar of English has remained the same, the vocabulary of English has been growing, and growing rapidly, not merely with each century, but with each generation. The discovery of the New World in 1492 gave an impetus to maritime enterprise in England, which it never lost, brought us into connection with the Spaniards, and hence contributed to our language several Spanish words. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Italian literature

was largely read; Wyatt and Surrey show its influence in their poems; and Italian words began to come in in considerable numbers. Commerce, too, has done much for us in this way; and along with the article imported, we have in general introduced also the name it bore in its own native country. In later times, Science has been making rapid strides has been bringing to light new discoveries and new inventions almost every week; and along with these new discoveries, the language has been enriched with new names and new terms. Let us look a little more closely at the character of these foreign contributions to the vocabulary of our tongue.

Alligator.

Armada.

Barricade.

Battledore.

3. Spanish Words.-The words we have received from the Spanish language are not numerous, but they are important. In addition to the ill-fated word armada, we have the Spanish for Mr, which is Don (from Lat. dominus, a lord), with its feminine Duenna. They gave us also alligator, which is our English way of writing el lagarto, the lizard. They also presented us with a large number of words that end in o—such as buffalo, cargo, desperado, guano, indigo, mosquito, mulatto, negro, potato, tornado, and others. The following is a tolerably full list :

:

Bravado.

Buffalo.

Cargo.

Cigar.

Cochineal.

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4. Italian Words.-Italian literature has been read and cultivated in England since the time of Chaucer - since the fourteenth century; and the arts and artists of Italy have for many centuries exerted a great deal of influence on those of England. Hence it is that we owe to the Italian language a large number of words. These relate to poetry, such as canto, sonnet, stanza; to music, as pianoforte, opera, oratorio, soprano, alto, contralto; to architecture and sculpture, as

portico, piazza, cupola, torso; and to painting, as studio, fresco (an open-air painting), and others. complete list:

The following is a

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Ballast.

Boom.

Boor.

Burgomaster.
Hoy.

Cornice.

Corridor.

Cupola.

Curvet.

Dilettante.

Ditto.

Doge.

Domino.

Extravaganza.

Fiasco.

Folio.

Fresco.

Gazette.

Gondola.

Granite.

Grotto.

Guitar.

Luff.

Reef.

Incognito.

Influenza.

Schiedam (gin).

Skates.

Skipper.

Lagoon.

Lava.

Lazaretto.

Macaroni.

Madonna.

Madrigal.

Malaria.

Manifesto.

Motto.

Moustache.

Niche.

Opera.

Oratorio.

Palette.

Pantaloon.

Parapet.

Pedant.

Pianoforte.

Piazza.

Pistol.

Portico.

5. Dutch Words.-We have had for many centuries commercial dealings with the Dutch; and as they, like ourselves, are a great seafaring people, they have given us a number of words relating to the management of ships. In the fourteenth century, the southern part of the German Ocean was the most frequented sea in the world; and the chances of plunder were so great that ships of war had to keep cruising up and down to protect the trading vessels that sailed between England and the Low Countries. The following are the words which we owe to the Netherlands :

Sloop.

Smack.

Proviso.

Quarto.

Regatta.

Ruffian.

Serenade.

Sonnet.

Soprano.

Stanza.

Stiletto.

Stucco.

Studio.

Tenor.

Smuggle.

Stiver.

Taffrail.

Terra-cotta.

Tirade.

Torso.

Trombone.

Umbrella.

Vermilion.

Vertu.

Virtuoso.

Vista.

Volcano.

Zany.

Trigger.

Wear (said of a

ship).

Yacht.

Yawl.

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