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BIBLE CLASSES.

We feel peculiar satisfaction in being able to state that an increasing interest is felt in different sections of this country, in the religious instruction and improvement of YOUNG PEOPLE. Pastors are awaking to feel that this section of their Master's vineyard has been too much neglected ; that the supposed obstacles to its moral culture, are fewer than they had imagined; and that it has yielded the most abundant fruits when cultivated. Very recently, Bible Classes have been reorganizing in the congregations of Rev. Dr’s. Milnor and Spring, and Rev. Messrs. Whelpley and Patton, and in several other congregations in New York, a deeper interest in the social study of the lively Oracles of God is felt than has been usual.

In several of these Bible Classes we do hope, that already eternal realities are felt to be of more momentous importance from the social study of their Bibles. And we do believe that, if there should not be seen the Spirit's influence descending like a mighty rushing wind upon them, as has been the case in some Bible Classes, yet the still small voice of Elijah’s God, will effectually operate on many hearts, turning some from darkness to light, and from the power of Satan unto God, and building up others in their most holy faith. We were much gratified with the account Dr. Milnor, Rector of St. George's Church, gave us of his Bible Class, and the numerous specimens of good composition we saw written on themes taken from the Bible Class text book. We hope it may not be long before he shall witness scenes like those mentioned in the subjoined extract from the Portland Mirror. We confidently expect that more systematic and efficient meas ures will soon be taken to multiply Bible Classes, and we feel assured they will increase the fruits of righteousness, some sixty, and some an HUNDRED fold.

Advantages of Bible Class Instruction. In the summer of 1817, a Catechetical School of young ladies was established in a town in York county,

in this State, and attened once a week. Wilbur's Biblical Catechism was the system used. Some wrote answers to the questions, having previously examined the scriptural references, handed in their writings to the teacher without a name, and the pieces were then read aloud, criticised as to the matter and manner of them, corrected with the pen, and returned, without the author being discovered by any one. At the same time the texts referred to for the answer, were committed to the memory, and recited by all. The first perceptible effect was a deep seriousness on the mind of one person, in consequence of a piece she had written on the immutability of God; for having discussed the question as the scriptural reference directed, the inference was irresistible that she must turn or die. It happened soon after this that a question was given out, to which Isaiah xxxiii. 14, formed a part of the answer, 6 Who among us shall dwell with the devouring fire ? who among us shall dwell with everlasting burnings ?” -In committing this passage to memory, another per

was struck under deep and pungent conviction. She however opened her mind to no one, and attended the School as usual. It so happened that the question was first proposed to her. She rose to answer, could not speak, burst into tears, and sat down. tion passed to the next, who also attempted to answer, but was constrained to sit do in tears. As soon as the school was dismissed, these two young ladies walked away together in deep distress, and on entering the house of one of them, the mother was greatly affected on seeing the situation they were in, and was very shortly found to be anxious for her own soul. These four persons ultimately gave satisfactory evidence of a change of heart, and were admitted to the Lord's table together in May following.

Christian Mirror.

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NATURAL HISTORY.

An Extract, illustrative of Numbers xi. 31. Quails are found throughout nearly the whole of Europe, as far north as Lapland; they are likewise

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abundant in Asia, as far as Siberia, but not in the extreme northern parts of that vast tract of country. In China they are very common, and they are used by the inhabitants for warming their hands. They are, moreover, copiously diffused in different regions of Africa. Although more addicted to run than to fly, and although, for the most part, incapable of continuing for any length of time on the wing without experiencing lassitude and fatigue, it is nevertheless certain that they undertake pretty extensive migrations, and in immense flocks, passing from the colder to the warmer latitudes in autumn, and retracing their way in the spring; and there is reason to believe that their passage usually takes place in the course of the night, for they are ac. customed to sleep, or at least to repose, during a siderable portion of the day, concealed in the tallest grass, when a dog may sometimes run in upon them before they are flushed. They are met with in many parts of England, but seldom in any considerable numbers. They leave there in August or September, are supposed to winter in Africa, and return early in Spring. On their arrival at Alexandria, such multitudes of them are exposed for sale, that the crews of merchant vessels are fed on them, and complaints have been laid at the consul's office by mariners against their captains, for giving them nothing but quails to eat. With wind and weather in their favor, they have been known to perform a flight of fifty leagues, across the Black Sea, in the course of a night. On the western coast of the kingdom of Naples, in the vicinity of Nettuno, quails have sometimes appeared in such prodigious quantities, that a hundred thousand have been caught in one day, and within the limited space of three or four miles. Most of them were conveyed to Rome, where they are in great request, and fetch a high price. Clouds of them also alight, in spring, along the shores of Provence, especially on the lands belonging to the bishop of Frejus that border on the sea, where they are some times found so exhausted, that for a few days at first, they may sometimes be caught with the hand. In some parts of the south of Russia, they so much

abound, that at the periods of their migration they are taken by thousands, and sent in casks to Moscow and St. Petersburg.

APPEALS AGAINST INTEMPERANCE.

Extracted from the able sermon of Rev. Luther F.

Dimmick, A. M. I THINK I shall not be going too far when I obey the direction of an inspired Apostle, who says, “ Young men likewise exhort to be sober-minded."* My young friends will permit me to express the hope that their energies may never be wasted, and their interests destroyed, by the practice which we have been considering. Look not on the sparkling liquor. Remember that at the last it biteth like a serpent, and stingeth like an adder."--Employ your powers for him who gave them. Endeavor to suppress this evil. Then God shall bless you, and prosper your way.

And let me say to young women, Avoid the company of him whose breath indicates familiarity with the intoxicating bowl. How often by this vice are your sex subjected to a life of wretchedness. Let it receive your most marked disapprobation. You can do more to suppress it now, than after you are settled in life, and the choice of your companion is no longer at your option.

Let the disciples of Christ render assistance on this subject. Let them keep clear of this vice themselves. Shall there ever be an intemperate Christian, pouring strong drink upon the graces which the Spirit has wrought in his soul? Heaven draw a veil over the spectacle, and let it not be known that such a thing exists in the universe! You, brethren, are the dwelling of the Holy Ghost—you are the temple of God. And it is written, “ If any man defile the temple of God, him shall God destroy."1-You have also much to do

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to prevent this vice in others. Your labors and prayers should be incessant, that it may be diminished all around you, and be utterly removed from the community.

[For the Monitor.]

ORDER.

Would you make the greatest progress in business, in knowledge, and in holiness, ask yourself solemnly every morning, · What does God require me to do this day ? After the proper answer, arrange your duties as to time and place. The seasons for devotion should be selected from those parts of the day in which the mind is most free from care. Be careful to fill up all the time in your plan, after making requisite allowances for contingencies.

Let your recreations, visits, business, and devotions, be so proportioned and arranged, as to conduce to your greatest acquisitions of holiness, to effect the greatest good to others, and most extensively to honor God. Let employments of less consequence be subordinate to those of greater. Guard against a temptation to attach more than their due relative importance to the minor actions of life ; such as miscellaneous reading and conversation, recreation and dressing. The duties of the present hour, and the great object of life, are constantly to be kept in view, and steadily and perseveringly to be pursued through every season of despondency, every temptation to sloth, and self-indulgence. EMILIUS.

AFFLUENCE OF AUTHORS AND EDITORS.

The unfortunate poet, Savage, was once desired by Sir Richard Steele, with an air of the utmost importance, to come to his house very early next morning. Mr. Savage came as he was invited, and found the chariot at the door, and Sir Richard waiting ready to

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