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THERON, PAULINUS,

PAULINUS, AND ASPASIO;

OR,

LETTERS AND DIALOGUES

UPON THE NATURE OP

LOVE TO GOD, FAITH IN CHRIST, ASSURANCE OF A

TITLE TO ETERNAL LIFE:

CONTAINING

SOME REMARKS ON THE SENTIMENTS

OP

THE REV. MESSIEURS HERVEY AND MARSHAL,

ON THESE SUBJECTS

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" AMIDST ALL THE DARKNESS AND UNCERTAINTY WHICH EVIDENTLY RUN THROUGH

THE WRITINGS OF THE BEST OF MEN, THIS IS OUR UNSPEAKABLE HAPPINESS, THAT WE HAVE A MORE SURE WORD OF PROPHECY, TO WHICH WE DO WELL TO TAKE HEED.' As FOR OFFENCE, THAT CANNOT BE GIVEN, AND OUGHT NOT TO BE TAKEN, WHEN ALL WE ADVANCE IS STRICTLY CONFORMABLE TO THE UNERRING RULE OF TRUTH. I HAVE NOTHING TO DO WITH THE PERSONS OP MEN, BUT WITH THE TRUTHS OF THE GOSPEL. OURANIUS, THOUGH EMINENTLY DEVOUT, MAY BB MISTAKEN."

Hervey.

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ADVERTISEMENT.

IF Paulinus's sentiments, finally embraced by Theron, and exhibited in the following Letters and Dialogues, are agreeable to the Holy Scriptures, there needs no apology for publishing them, at a time when the contrary errors so much prevail in the British dominions. And it is hoped candid readers will easily excuse the mentioning by name some authors in the contrary scheme, as they seem to be esteemed the best on that side of the question. If his sentiments are wrong, let some man of a clear head and a friendly heart, set him right, from the sacred oracles of truth; and it will be accepted, as well by him as by the public, with the utmost gratitude. For these are points in which our dearest, our spiritual and eternal interest is greatest concerned; and it is even of infinite importance, that we know the truth before it is too late.

“Should any thing be urged," says Mr. Hervey, in the preface to his Theron and Aspasio, "forcible enough to overthrow my arguments, or detect a mistake in my sentiments, the world may depend upon seeing a free and undissembled retraction. I shall look upon it as a duty which I owe to my conscience, to my readers, and to my God, publicly to acknowledge the error." And indeed, we who claim to be the ministers of Christ, are quite insensible to the honor of God, and to our own eternal interest, as well as the eternal interest of our fellow-creatures, if we are not conscientiously concerned to advance and maintain the truth, and nothing but the truth. Wherefore, to the above-recited declaration

of Mr. Hervey, the publisher of these Letters and Dialogues says Amen, with all his heart.

N. B. As Paulinus had some other books in view, besides the two chiefly referred to, * so Theron has sometimes introduced a text of Scripture, an argument, etc., not contained in either of these books, and for which these two authors are not answerable.

* Most of the marginal references to Hervey's Dialogues, and Marshal on Sanctification, in the first edition of Bellamy, are omitted in this, as the edition of those works referred to by him are not now in use. All the important passages which Bellamy introduces from Hervey and Marshal with quotation

marks, are indicated, in the present edition, by the letters H and M, denoting " those authors respectively. - Eds.

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New ENGLAND, Dec. 15, 1758. DEAR ASPASIO :

News from your Theron now in this remote corner of the earth, you will eagerly expect by every ship that sails from these parts. But what shall I write, O my friend! No pleasant walks, no beautiful gardens, no romantic mounts, my dear Aspasio, nor any other theme to entertain and to amuse, must you expect from me! Alas! I have been deceived! My hopes, once high raised, are, I think, entirely gone. As the “rush without mire, and the flag without water, so the hypocrite's hope shall perish.”*

As I was walking in my garden, soon after our visit to Philenor,t (which was, as I remember, about the middle of harvest, A. D. 1754,) musing on all your agreeable conversation, your fervent zeal, and how you urged me to believe To believe what? said I, to myself. To believe that Christ died for me. How for me? thought I. Aspasio knows, I believe that Christ died for sinners. Yes, but he would have me apply that to my own soul, and believe Christ died for me. Aspasio knows, I believe that Christ died; that whosoever, according to the true sense of the gospel, believes in him, should not perish, but have everlasting life. Is this believing in him? Is this justifying, saving faith? To believe I am one that he died for; one for whom he intended to procure pardon, reconciliation with God, and eternal life? Yes, this, this is faith. "A real persuasion that the blessed Jesus has shed his

# The first edition of Mr. Hervey's Dialogues is referred to in this letter; as Theron is supposed, soon after the conversation at Philenor's, to have experienced what follows. † Mr. Hervey's Dialogues, vol. iii. p. 262.

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