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Statement of—Continued

Page

Leighty, George E., representing Railway Labor Executives Associa-

tion..

1889

Lucas, Hon. Scott W., representing the American Finance Conference. 1521
MacGowan, Charles J., international president, International Brother-

hoods of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Drop
Forgers, and Helpers, AFL.

1764
McCawley, J. F., Indiana State president, Property Owners of Amer-
ica, Inc.

2011
Mann, J. L., president, Sturgis Posture Chair Co., Sturgis, Mich.. 1720
Marchetti, Peter E., representing the Small Property Owners Associa-
tion of Omaha (Nebr.).

2171
Martin, Ned, Akron, Ohio.

1990
Mitchell, Hon. Hugh B., a Representative in Congress from the State
of Washington

2155

Moloney, John F., representing National Cottonseed Products Asso-

ciation, Memphis, Tenn..

1477

Moore, Carlton, Sr., Home and Property Owners' Alliance, Inc.. 1857

Moore, Perry E., president, New York Cotton Exchange

1491

Morris, Hon. Toby, a Representative in Congress from the State of
Oklahoma

2117

Mortgage Bankers Association of America

1572

Murchison, Claudius, American Cotton Manufacturers Institute. 1462

Myers, Hon. Francis J., representing National Foundation of Con-

sumer Credit and Retail Credit Institute of America

1537

National Federation of Settlements, Inc.

1761

National Retail Furniture Association..

1984

National Retail Hardware Association...

1982

Nau, Carlton L., general manager, American Public Power Association. 1716

O'Donovan, Patrick J., representing California State Apartment

Conference

1815

Oklahoma Apartment Owners Association

2001
Patman, Hon. Wright, chairman, Select Committee on Small Busi-

2025, 2028, 2036

Pinkston, Jack, Home and Property Owners' Alliance.

1857

Porter, Elizabeth K., president, American Nurses Association

1753

Powers, Edward H., representing Kansas State Real Estate Board.. 1898

Ramoneda, Louis V., president, American Motor Hotel Association. 1811

Rankin, James L., American Cotton Manufacturers Institute.

1462

Rees, Hon. Edward H., a Representative in Congress from the State

of Kansas..

2164

Riggle, John J., assistant secretary, National Council of Farmer
Cooperatives

1517

Russell, William E., representing Metropolitan Fair Rent Committee

of New York.

1900

Russell, William W., representing National Apartment Owners

Association, Inc.--

1650

Schiff, Philip, representing American Association of Social Workers.. 1874

Schmidt, William, president, Property Owners Association of

America.

1684

Sherrard, Glenwood J., representing American Hotel Association 1767
Sibley, William A. L., representing American Cotton Manufacturers
Institute..

1462
Snyder, Calvin K., secretary, Realtors' Washington Committee,
National Association of Real Estate Boards...

1575

Sparkman, Hon. John J., a United States Senator from the State of

Alabama

2026

Spiegel, E. M., representing National Association of Home Builders. - 1938,

1946

Steinkraus, Herman W., representing the Chamber of Commerce of

the United States.

1419

Tait, Robert C., president, Stromberg-Carlson Co..

1551

Vanderslice, R.' L., representing Chicago Residential Hotel Associa-

tion.-

1773

Victor, Catherine, Detroit, Mich.

1999
Wagner, Edmund F., representing the Commerce and Industry Asso-
ciation of New York, Inc.

1742

ness.

Statement of-Continued

Page

Wagner, Walter, Central Labor Union and Metal Trades Council of

the Panama Canal Zone.

1711

Weight, Burtram A., representing Apartment House Association of

Utah, the Utah State Realty Association, and the Salt Lake Real
Estate Board.--

1969

Werking, Henry A., American Home Owners, Inc.-

1987

Woods, Tighe E., Housing Expediter.

1810, 1911

Wright, Mrs. Leslie, representing General Federation of Women's

Clubs.

1749

Miscellaneous information submitted to the committee by-

American Nurses Association:

Exhibit I. Spot check of current hospital nursing, January 1951.. 1756

Exhibit II. Salary data-teachers, librarians, dietitians, factory

workers, and office workers (women)-

1757

Exhibit III. Platform for the American Nurses' Association.. 1758

Anderson Cattle Co., Inc., letter of May 24, 1951, to Hon. Edward H.
Rees

2165

Blake, W. R., National Cotton Council of America, supplemental state-.

ment.

1473, 1491

Burger, George J., National Federation of Independent Business, letter
of May 24, 1951, to Hon. Ralph A. Gamble.

1569

California State Apartment Conference:

Burmester, H. F., letter of April 23, 1951.

1823

Chace, Burton W., mayor, Long Beach, Calif., letter of April 19,

1951

1823

Consumers' price index, moderate income families in large cities

(chart)

1821

Cotton, John, letter of May 24, 1951, to William Russell.

1819
Political Hokum, editorial from Los Angeles Times, April 20,
1951.-

1823

Residential income vacancy survey (chart)

1822

Christensen, William S. L., letter of June 1, 1951, to Hon. August
H, Andresen.

1986
Congress of Industrial Organizations, letter of June 18, 1951, and
enclosures.

2178
Crawford, Hon. Fred L., speech in House of Representatives, entitled
"Control of Margins on Commodity Exchanges”

1511
DeLaval Steam Turbine Co., Trenton, N. J., letter of May 26, 1951,
to Hon. Charles R. Howell..

1715
Engle, Hon. Clair:

Additional contracts as a result of certification by the Defense
Production Administrator (table).

2134

Home and Property Owners' Alliance:

Trends in available rental housing in Texas.

1866

Linen Trade Association, Inc., New York, N. Y., letter of June 8,
1951, to Hon. Brent Spence--

1713
Mayonnaise and Salad Dressing Manufacturers' Association, Inc.,
letter of June 12, 1951, to Hon. Brent Spence---

1764

Multer, Hon. Abraham J.:

Baruch, Bernard M., letter of June 6, 1951, to Hon. Abraham J.

Multer..

1958

Cattleman Supports Beef Price Roll-Back, article from New
World Telgram and Sun, May 31, 1951..

1738
Statement requested by

2178
Telegram of June 4, 1951, to Bernard M. Baruch.

1958

National Association of Home Builders:

FHA new unit applications, 1949, 1950, 1951 (chart)-

1940

Survey on effects of residential credit controls (excerpts from

typical replies) -

1951

Total non-farm housing starts, 1948–51 (chart).

1940

VA appraisal assignments for new construction (chart)

1941

National Association of Mutual Savings Banks, letter of June 4, 1951,

to Hon. Brent Spence-

1569

National Association of Real Estate Boards:

Control-Folklore Versus Economic Reality (excerpts from
article by W. R. Knight, Michigan State College).

1595
Critical defense housing areas.

1634

Page

1627

1500

1502

1692
1469

Miscellaneous information submitted to the committee by-Continued
National Association of Real Estate Boards---Continued

Housing in areas adjacent to military installations and contact

work with billeting officers through local committees..

List of military and defense plant areas where housing might be

needed.

Rent control and the distribution of income (excerpts from article

by D. Gale Johnson, University of Chicago).

The housing situation, 1950---

Weekly earnings and consumers' prices (chart)
National Savings and Loan League, letter of June 8, 1951, to Hon.'

Brent Spence...

New York Cotton Exchange:

Commodity Exchange Authority, monthly report of volume on

cotton futures trading--

Margin requirements from January 1, 1946, to April 11, 1951..

Patman, Hon. Wright:

Need for Small Defense Plants Corporation..

Problems of small business related to the national emergency -

Credit controls..

Current procurement problems.

Current scarce materials problems.

Financing problems --

Price and wage controls.

The small-business problem: Small business and the mobilization

program.

Property Owners' Association of America:
Rent Control in War and Peace (article by John and Richard

Usher)...
Sibley, William A. L., letter of June 1, 1951, to Hon. Paul Brown..
Stromberg-Carlson Co.:

Electric range and refrigerator factory sales: Actual and adjusted

to eliminate secular trend and to equalize amplitudinal varia-

tion, January 1949 through March 1951 (table)
Explanation of statistical procedure used in deriving data shown

on chart B..
Indices of automobile and furniture production: Actual and

adjusted to eliminate secular trend and to equalize amplitudinal

variation, January 1949 through May 1951 (table) -
Indices of wholesale prices of television sets and of housefurnish-

ings goods, January 1948 through March 1951 (chart)--
Indices of wholesale prices of television sets and of housefurnish-

ings goods, January 1948 through March 1951 (table)--
Monthly factory sales of television sets, deep freezers, electric

ranges, and refrigerators, and monthly production of automo-

biles and furniture, January 1949 through May 1951 (chart)--
Percentage distribution of prospective buyers of television sets

by income groups, 1949 and 1950 (table)
Size of replacement market for home furnishings in 1950.
Size of replacement market for television sets and automobiles,

1950.

Television sets: Factory sales monthly, end-of-month factory

inventory, and ratio of inventory to sales, January 1950 through

May 1951 (chart)

Television sets: Factory sales monthly, end-of-month factory

inventory, and ratio of inventory to sales, January 1950 through

May 1951 (table)--

Wilson, Charles E., Director of Defense Mobilization:

Report of the four-member committee, appointed February 26,

1951.-

1562

1561

1563

1566

1567

1560

1563
1565

1565

1484

DEFENSE PRODUCTION ACT AMENDMENTS OF 1951

THURSDAY, MAY 31, 1951

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
COMMITTEE ON BANKING AND CURRENCY,

Washington, D. C. The committee met at 10 a. m., Hon. Paul Brown, presiding. Members present: Mr. Brown, Mr. Patman, Mr. Rains, Mr. Deane, Mr. McKinnon, Mr. Bolling, Mr. Wolcott, Mr. Cole, and Mr. Betts.

Mr. BROWN. The committee will come to order. Mr. Clerk, call the first witness.

Mr. HALLAHAN. The first witness is Mr. Herman W. Steinkraus, representing the Chamber of Commerce of the United States.

STATEMENT OF HERMAN W. STEINKRAUS, THE CHAMBER OF

COMMERCE OF THE UNITED STATES

Mr. STEINKRAUS. Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the committee, my name is Herman W. Steinkraus. I am chairman of the executive committee of the Chamber of Commerce of the United States, and am president of the Bridgeport Brass Co., Bridgeport, Conn.

I believe the chairman and the gentlemen of the committee know that the Chamber of Commerce of the United States is a national federation which at present has 3,133 local chambers of commerce and trade associations as members, with an underlying membership of 1,350,000 individual businessmen. Because the chamber in membership and direct interests embraces every important activity in our economy; and, through its membership-small business as well as large-it presents the opinion of a cross section of our entire economy, thus it is that policies of the chamber do not represent the views of some special group or particular interest, but are drawn from the diverse interests of the country as a whole and are voted by its membership

This voting, incidentally, is so regulated that no geographic concentration of interests or economic concentration of power can override the broader interests of the entire membership.

At a recent annual convention here in Washington, the chamber voted upon a set of policies, with over 600 delegates from all over the United States present, to take part in the discussion of these policies. So, Mr. Chairman, I was somewhat surprised when arriving in Washington last night to read in the papers that a prominent officer of a great labor union took it upon himself to make statements about the United States Chamber of Commerce which are entirely out of line with the facts. In the official release of this organization he stated

there was a complete irresponsibility and a narrow greed that could wholly wreck our defense program if the ideas of the United States Chamber of Commerce were adopted.

I believe this is a just trick on the public for any CIO official to make such a statement about this organization. I have had many years of experience with Mr. Carey. I have been in debates with him numerous times, and I have read much of what he has had to say. I think his statement to the Senate committee yesterday is typical of the insidious type of remarks he makes.

In this case he said something cleverly with the purpose of giving the public a wrong impression.

There is absolutely no ground for the insinuation in his statement that the National Chamber proposed any such deal with organized labor, or with anybody else, and Jim Carey knows that to be a fact. Such a statement, I believe, discredits anything else he may have to say.

Business believes that wages do not need to be controlled any more than prices need to be controlled. Union leaders like Jim Carey are doing a disservice to the American worker by advocating that he accept further regimentation from the Government.

The chamber is interested in keeping both the workingman and the businessman free from Government control. We believe that neither wage nor price controls will check inflation. What will do the job are tighter credit controls; reduced Government spending; higher taxes, and increased production.

I thought that I ought to take up this challenge which Mr. Carey so loosely tosses about, because it really is a disservice to the American people for a man high in the councils of a great labor organization to make such statements.

In enacting the Defense Production Act, Congress said: The United States is determined to develop and maintain whatever military and economic strength is found to be necessaryto oppose acts of aggression and to promote peace.

The Chamber of Commerce of the United States endorses that statement of the Congress and urges every practical means available for increasing our military might and, at the same time, maintaining a healthy, growing civilian economy.

While the point is one on which no one disagrees, we cannot overemphasize the fundamental necessity, in this period of our testing as a free and democratic people, of maintaining a vigilant concern for the strength and efficiency of our home front.

Our military strength itself can be no greater than the strength and efficiency of that home front.

We are without rival in industrial capacity, in technological knowledge, and in the productive skills and versatilities of our free labor force. The test is whether we can maintain the smoothness and efficiency of over-all coordination required for the continued translation of unrivaled resources into unrivaled production.

We would do well to remind ourselves that it was our enemies' crack-up on the production front that brought them down to hopeless impotence in the final stages of the last war.

It is on that level of importance that we must appraise the danger of neglecting to give full consideration to the vital matter of keeping our civilian economy in the soundest possible condition.

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