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see the government established on safe foundations. His habits of close observation, and facility in description, enable him to give some graphic sketches of men and passing events.

WASHINGTON City, Dec. 5, 1801. REV. DR. DANA.*

Dear Sir:-We arrived in this city on Wednesday evening. Many of the members from different parts of the Union were in before us, but we were not so happy as to find a single man who was not strongly attached to the present administration. From them little information is to be obtained. Few Federalists had arrived this morning. It is not in my power to say any thing, with certainty, respecting the leading subjects to be brought forward the present session. Conjecture is alive, and some deep-laid plans, in opposition to the spirit of the constitution, are said to be concerted. In this city, and the adjacent country, the President is highly popular. There is to be no speech at the opening of the session. The flimsy pretense is, that speeches are anti-republican, but the true reason you will easily conceive. It is said the President will have no Levees during the session, which is to be very short; that lengthy reports are to be given from the heads of departments, especially one, that is to astonish the nation, from the Genevan Treasurer; that the principal business of Congress is already cut and dried, and is to be done, not in the tedious and expensive way of long speeches, but in the summary manner of silent voting. From information which, I think, admits of very little doubt, the administration has two leading objects in view--one is to relax, as much as possible, every sinew of government, and the other, to render it popular by the sem

*.Joseph Dana, D.D., born at Pomfret, Conn., Nov. 2, 1742; graduated at Yale College, 1760. He was ordained pastor of the South Church, Ipswich, Vov. 5, 1765. He was refined, gentlemanly, pious, and patriotic. His intellectual endowments were of an high order and richly improved; his style strong, lucid, and sententious. Many of his sermors were printed. Harvard College made him a Doctor of Divinity in 1801. He died Nov. 16, 1827.-Felt's History, Ipswich.

ini, á s kewer earnest and patria * 2009!!!!! énia, Zed on safe founias. E .**f iisp patratin, ani facility in descriptions

1.1. s ve multe graphic sketches of men and pas

blance of cheapness. A total change in the Judiciary system is undoubtedly intended. Those who pretend to correct information, say there is to be but one federal court, and that, a mere Court of Chancery, to which appeals may be made from the state courts, where all causes are to originate and pass a legal process, but I will not trouble you with mere conjecture.

Your friend and brother,

M. CUTLER.

WASHINGTON City, Dec. ö. IN i. Dr. D484.* Dn. ir Sir:-We arrived in this city on Weinesdar eremis

of the in-mbers froin different parts of the l’nion Team

fosse 12w, but we were not so happy as to find a singlese 13.4* not strongly attached to the present administna in the little information is to be obtained. Few fe we had arrived this morning. It is not in my pore?? I'ly thin, with certainty, respecting the leading subyace po brought forward the present session. Conjecture : and some deep-laid plans, in opposition to the spirit?

stitution, are said to be concerted. In this city.co. Crent country, the President is highly popular. There pollin speech at the opening of the session. The fins p in, that speeches are anti-republican, but the tre: sou will easily conceive. It is said the President TL Lerees during the session, which is to be rery shor:

y reports are to be given from the heads of depar: specially one, that is to astonish the nation, from is · Treasurer: that the principal business of Congreso Turut and dried, and is to be done, not in the telous plive way of long speeches, but in the summary manner

WASHINGTON City, Dec. 5, 1801. DR. TORREY.*

Dear Sir:- I can say but little on the subject of politics, without entering the field of conjecture. The Democrats appear to feel themselves strong-very close-mouthed when with Federalists, and in constant consultation.

We are told by the President's friends, that it is to be a very short session— business to be done in a summary way by giving our silent votes--that it is to consist, principally, not in framing but in repealing laws, which will require very little time. There appears no doubt that the Democrats intend to destroy the present Judiciary system. Many other changes are mentioned, which I will not now enumerate. The great interests of the country appear to be in a more alarming situation than I conceived them to be when I left home. But I am confident there will be an able and determined opposition to the enemies of the Constitution, and, though numbers may overcome, the conquest will not be so easy as seems to be imagined. By accounts this evening, both Houses will be unusually full on Monday. Your affectionate parent,

M. CUTLER. *Joseph Torrey, M.D., born in Killingly, Conn., March 18, 1768. Died at Beverly, Dec. 8, 1850. Married Mary, eldest daughter of Dr. Cutler. He was the fifth in descent from Rev. Samuel Torrey, of Weymouth, who declined the Presidency of Harvard ('ollege, and on three occasions preached the Election Sermons. Dr. Torrey's progenitors were distinguished in the medical profession, and he was himself a well known and highly esteemed physician. He began to practice in Rowley, then in Danvers, and, from 1805 to 1840, in Salem, Mass. Mrs. Torrey died at Burlington, Vt., Sept., 1836, while on a visit to her son, Rev. Joseph Torrey, D.D., President of the University of Vermont.

roting. From information which, I think, admite de

doubt, the administration has two leading objects one is to relax, as much as possible, every siner of not, and the other, to render it popular by the sem

atit, D. born at Pomfret, Conn., Nov. 2, 174; grado He college, 1781). He was ordained pastor of the v nih for: ,, 1705. He was refined, gentlemanly, puca

l. intellectual endowments were of an bigh or Doved; his style strong, lucid, and sententious. Ma

We're printed. Harvard College made him a Doctor o ul. lle died for 16, 18:27.--Felt's History, Ipswich.

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* \'s peninse ti na broen in Waren, Pyrouth Co., Vass., Feb. 28, 17,2, sendintos llartir Inisssity in lins on the first of May, ,,** Yrs otrok in Braton for Baltimore, where he arrived on the de presso set that 109ths. Here he put his trunk into a wagon and printip*fgers (the journey arrow the mountains on foot. He reached fotban than the forth of June, and embarked the same day in a boat per V 11# wisato ha arrived on the sixteenth. On the fourth of July hoe mutinszentand in the first proceedings bad on the bank of the

opbingoen in boonop of the day, and on the twentieth, listened to the Tiend W110S "Vrt preneheld in the English tongue north-west of the Ob (hov Ibrie William Brock --Exodus 19: 5, 6). When the troops Tell for llammar, loin intimate friend Major Doughty, made him a In event of his dwelling house, a well-finished log-building, standing in this sealed he wouf angle of the fort. In 1797, he was appointed Judge o l'abate for Wobeington ('outy. Ile represented the Territory in

hongness from 1X01 1803. In 1810, he was appointed Associate Judge til the end of common Pleas, In 1814, was appointed Master Com

hisabuntom in (hancery. He was one of the first in Ohio who paid atcontinue to the raining of Merino Sheep. In his disposition, Mr. Fear

WASHINGTON, Dec. 8, 1801. P.S. On the inclosed document [the Message of President Jefferson], I have not time to make any remarks, nor is it necessary. You will instantly see that it contains principles and objects, notwithstanding its popular cast, which must arrest the most serious attention of every thinking American.

With what expedition these Democrats do their business ! It was in the press, and probably numbers struck off, before it was communicated to Congress, that numerons copies might be forwarded by this day's mail to every part of the country.

AM

WASHINGTON, Dec. 14, 1801. MAJOR BURNHAM.*

Dear Sir :—The time I have been in the House has not been long enough to form much acquaintance, or obtain much knowledge of individual members. But I have the pleasure of assuring you that the truly republican Federalists, though a minority, possess a full proportion of the ability of the House. Connecticut has, in both Houses, an able and respectable representation. Most of the Federalists from the Middle and Southern States are men of handsome talents. Those from N. Hampshire are good men and true. The decided friends of the Constitution and a free and rational government are: from Vermont, 1; New Hampshire, 4; Connecticut, 7; New York, 3; Pennsylvania, 3; Delaware, 1 ; Maryland, 3; ing was remarkably cheerful and pleasant. His frank, manly civility and sound discriminating mind made him a favorite with the people, as well as the courts, and he had at his command much of the law business of the country. He had great sympathy for the poor and oppressed, and was ever ready to stretch forth his hand and open his purse for their relief. He died August 21, 18:22.-History of Washington County.

* Major Thomas Burnham graduated at Harvard College, 1772; was appointed teacher of the Ipswich Grammar School in 1774; continued in that office for five years, when he entered the army, in which he attained the rank of Major. After the peace, he resumed the office of teacher, and kept the school six years, 1786-91; again one year, 1793; and afterward eleven years, 1807-17; in all, twenty-three years. New Eng. Gen. and Hist. Register (April, 1852).

VOL. II.--4

Till the joint 1 * !! ! . . .: He recta

In the 14th of Jul10-ati Picha : 5-tss in a Duke .!! Here he arriend of the 17*:L in the fourth a Tillip in the first propriuza ba in the bank of the

in in lot of the dir, and on the twentieth listened to the I n pochined in the English tongue north-west of the

lut h ain Breck--Exodus 19: 5, 6). When the trend

llamar, la llimate friend Major Doughty, made i ilie dwelling house, a well-finished log-building, standing b etangle of the fort. In 1797, he was appointed out or buy llungton ('ounty. He represented the Territo

Iti In 1870, he was appointed Associate / 14 il lunumun Pleas. In 1814, was appointed Master! Tullnerin lle was one of the first in Ohio who pay han. Xof Merino Sheep. In his disposition, Mr.!

You will probably hear little from the Federalists for the present. It is a matter of notoriety that the leading Democrats feel much chagrin in not meeting with a virulent opposition. There is nothing they more ardently wish, but they will not be gratified. In every constitutional measure tending to promote the public good, they will find in the minority a cheerful concurrence. When opposition is necessary, it will be on the ground of just principles and fair reasoning, devoid of passion or the spirit of party. Such is the policy which has been proposedl, and has met the full approbation of every individual. It is also certain that the Democrats are not agreed among themselves. Several instances have already occurred, in which many of them have voted on the Federal side. But it is unpleasant to know that Virginia has a decided predominancy in the present legislature, and, having all the Democrats subservient to her political views, will give law to the nation. Sincerely,

M. CUTLER.

[Dr. Cutler to his daughter.]

WASHINGTON, Dec. 21, 1801. My Dear Betsy :- . . . It shall be the subject of this letter to give you some account of my present situation and of occurrences since I left home.

The city of Washington, in point of situation, is much more delightful than I expected to find it. The ground, in general, is elevated, mostly cleared, and commands a pleasing prospect of the Potomac River. The buildings are brick, and erected in what are called large blocks, that is, from two to five or six houses joined together, and appear like one long building. There is one block of seven, another of nine, and one of twenty houses, but they are scattered over a large extent of ground. The block in which I live contains six houses, four stories high, and very handsomely furnished. It is situated east of the Capitol, on the highest ground in the city. Mr. King, our landlord, occupies the south end, only one room in front, which is our parlor for receiving company and dining, and one room back, occupied by Mr. King's family, the kitchen is

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