Pagina-afbeeldingen
PDF
ePub
[ocr errors]

ing vote in favor of the Bill. When the previous resolution passed, the yeas were 15 and nays 13, but Mr. Ross and Mr. Ogden have since arrived, who complete the full number of Federalists in that House. The Bill has, indeed, to pass a third reading, but it is not usual, nor is it intended, at that time, to make any opposition.

In the House very little business of public importance has been yet done. Much of the last week was taken up with attempts to instruct the Committee of Ways and Means to make particular inquiry whether it be expedient, or not, to reduce the duty on salt, or on brown sugar, bohea tea, and coffee--articles of general consumption among the poorer classes, and on which specific duties are paid much too high for the price they will bear in a time of peace. But not even an inquiry into the expediency could be obtained. Yesterday an attempt was made to call upon the Secretary of the Treas. · ury to lay before the House in detail the expenses of collecting the internal taxes, which has been the great ostensible argument for repealing them, but in vain. Another trial for inquiry, respecting the duties on salt, sugar, tea, and coffee, was made, but failed. The majority are so much Frenchified that, like the silent branch of the French Government, they voted without debating. Several very argumentative and impressive speeches were made by members on our side the House, and the debates occupied nearly the whole day, but not a member on the opposite side opened his mouth, unless in "grinning a horrid smile."

The yeas and nays on all these, and on a great number of other questions, have been taken, but the names have not been permitted, in one instance, to be inserted in the papers. Until it was found that the names could be suppressed, the most forcible argument that could be offered on any question was a call for the vote by yeas and nays, but now even this solitary argument has lost its effect. And within a few days a new mode of giving the debates in the Democratic papers is adopted. Messrs. Duane and Smith are displaying their talents in giving them in summaries. You will find the debate on the subjects I have mentioned (probably in your papers) given in this

[ocr errors]

the Vice-President et 12 vote in favor of the Bill. When the previse

mas podwened, the yeas were 15 and nays 13, but Mr. Rose di bleu have since arrived, who complete the full ima Ferjeralints in that House. The Bill has, indee?.09.15 Hind reading, but it is not usual, nor is it intended to ist, to make any opposition.

In the House very little business of public importants "! prt done. Much of the last week was taken in

1 71 ?*?lipts to instruct the Committee of Ways and Mews sht particular inquiry whether it be expedient

, or at nep the duty on salt, or on brown sugar, böhea tena pop-articles of general consumption among supon, and on which specific duties are paid muck zo ile price they will bear in a time of

way. The speeches on both sides (when there were such) are named, and some of the arguments, pro and con, but in a manner totally adverse to the truth. Many of the arguments on our side are mentioned, but a cast is given them which renders them futile, or really favorable to their opponents, while those on the opposite side are exhibited in pointed and popular strains.

From what has passed in the Houses, beyond all doubt, the internal system of taxation will be abolished. A direct tax is talked of, but an increase of duties on imports is, at present, more probable. The Select Committee have this day reported a bill for repealing the former and enacting a new naturalization law. It has not been taken up, but I believe it will fully meet the wishes of Jefferson. When the Judiciary bill comes before our House, it is expected that the majority will give it their silent vote, and not improbably this mode of doing business will prevail throughout the session. “O tempora, 0 mores!" We are much alarmed at seeing the names of the Committee from the two Houses of Massachusetts, appointed to answer the Governor's speech. Will you write me on this subject ? Your friend and brother, M. CUTLER.

[ocr errors]

peace. . ::quiry into the expediency could be obtained. Pag 1***mpt was made to call upon the Secretary of the Tri tu lay before the House in detail the expenses of cik the internal taxes, which has been the great ostendit sent for repealing them, but in rain. Another train ry, respecting the duties on salt, sugar, tea, and the navle, but failed. The majority are so much Frezett. The the silent branch of the French Government

, 29 without debating. Sereral very argumentative as is te speeches were made by members on our side 2 and the debates occupied nearly the whole dar

, dan nember on the opposite side opened his mouth, ustan

inning a horrid smile."
pras and nays on all these, and on a great number i
destions, have been taken, but the names have not beri
mul, in one instance, to be inserted in the papers.
found that the names could be suppressed

, the mes
argument that could be offered on any question is:
'he vote by yeas and nays, but now even this solitar
t has lost its effect. And within a few dars a ner mot

the debates in the Democratic papers is adopted
Duane and Smith are displaying their talents in gr
in summaries. You will find the debate on the sun
ve mentioned (probably in your papers) giren in the

Feb. 1, Monday. Attended Congress. Considerable done.

Feb. 3, Wednesday. Question on Judiciary bill taken in the Senate and passed—ayes, 16, nays, 15.

Feb. 4, Thursday. Judiciary bill came to our House. Sensible impression made on every countenance when announced, but the feeling of the two sides of the House very different.

Feb. 6, Saturday. Dined at the President's—Messrs. Hillhouse, Foster, and Ross, of the Senate; General Bond, Wadsworth, Woods, Hastings, Tenney, Read, and myself. Dinner not as elegant as when we dined before. Rice soup, round of beef, turkey, mutton, ham, loin of veal, cutlets of mutton or veal, fried eggs, fried beef, a pie called macaroni, which appeared to be a rich crust filled with the strillions of onions, or shallots, which I took it to be, tasted very strong, and not agreeable. Mr. Lewis told me there were none in it; it was an Italian dish, and what appeared like onions was made of

UUUU.

[ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

10e-cream very good, crust wholly dried, crumbled into thin flakes; a dish somewhat like a pudding-inside white as milk or curd, very porous and light, covered with creamsaucemvery fine. Many other jimcracks, a great variety of fruit, plenty of wines, and good. President social. We drank tea and viewed again the great cheese.

Feb. 7, Lord's Day. Mr. McCormick preached in the Hall.

Feb. 8, Jonday. Engaged in destroying the Mint. The President sent me Dr. Lettsom's Observations on Cowpox, with a very polite note.

Feb. 10, Wednesday. Motion for repealing the internal system of taxation.

Feb. 11, Thursday. Returned the President Dr. Lettsomos Observations on the Cow-pox, with a pretty long billet, acknowledging his politeness, and some remarks on the work.

Feb. 12, Friday. Nothing very interesting.

Feb. 13. Making arrangements for the attack on the Judiciary, expected on Monday.

Feb. 14, Lord's Day. Mr. Gant preached in the Hall. A very full Assembly. Mr. Jefferson present.

Feb. 20, Saturday. On Thursday evening, about 10, Mr. Dayton, going to bed, pulled off a pair of silk stockings, laid his stockings on his slippers at the bedside. He perceived some sparks as he pulled them off. In the morning both stockings were burnt to a cinder, threads appearing to lie in their position in a coil; slippers burnt to a crisp; carpet burnt through and floor to a coal, so as to cause the resin to run. Lay near the bed, and near the curtains. By electrical fluid, Many gentlemen noted the sparkling of their silk stockings as they went to bed. I wore silk stockings that day, but did not notice sparks. The clock (or figured work) of one of the stockings, which was stretched out, was to be seen.

Garter under the stocking, end out, was not burnt.*

[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]

* A very singular occurrence has happened to General Dayton, of Elizabethtown, one of the New Jersey Senators. He pulled off his stockings of silk under which were another pair of woolen gauze, just as he was going to bed The former were dropped on the smali carpet by the best inle, and the latter were thrown to some distance near its

[ocr errors]

puun ulans I LED Ice-cream very good, crust with : thin fshes:ad: Ilikutat like a porta so luck or curl, very popus and light, covered tipiery tize. Vnd other jimerarks, a pena .., pinty of wines, and grond. Pre zviens aicie? Trim

Wed sain the great chere F1.7, Lurl's Inty. Mr. McCormick preachelo! F!, Juay. Engaged in destroying the vis: ito Pront went me Dr. Lettom's Orte 1. with a very polite lote. 1.4. 14. W mxbayMotion for repealing the in

! of taxation. ('.11. Thursday. Returned the President Dr. Lecco uslaitol* on the Cow-pox, with a pretty long

Dr. Cutler's diary is omitted for the next week. His letters, here given, contain a fuller account of the proceedings in Congress :

WASHINGTON, Feb. 1, 1802. DR. TORREY.

Dear Sir :- . . I found this morning the sprigs and holly leaf taken as precious relics from the tomb of the great Washington (which I had folded up for the purpose of inclosing them to Mrs. Torrey) were left.

I wrote to her at a very late hour at night, after having been extremely fatigued with business in the evening, and inadvertently sealed the letter without thinking of what I had promised to inclose. Having a number of letters on Saturday morning to put into the box for the mail, I made another mistake, and did not put her letter in with the rest. Last evening I wrote to you, and sent her letter with it to the office. You would not wonder at these mistakes were you sensible of the state of things here, and of some particular business with which, as the member of a committee, I have for some time past been incessantly engaged. In a former letter I observed that you could form no idea of the debates in Congress from the papers. On one side amended, or perhaps new made, on the other, the best parts omitted or altered. Since that time so much complaint has been made, that they have appeared with more correctness. The Federalists in the Senate, when debating on the repeal of the Judiciary, aware of this evil, have taken the precaution, either before or after, to commit their speeches to paper, and they are published, it

foizing his politeness, and some remarks on the sai
74. 12. Friday. Nothing very interesting.
11.13. Making arrangements for the attack on be.
iry, pipeeted on Monday.
4. 14, Lurid's Day. Mr. Gant preached in the Hall !
al Assembly. Mr. Jefferson present.
4.), Saturday. On Thursday erening, about 10. V.
int, going to bed, pulled off a pair of silk stockings.
chines on his slippers at the bedside. He petite

trh als he pulled them off. In the mornit: list ** Were burnt to a cimer, threads appearing in life by ention in a coil: slippers burnt to a crisp; carper her! { and floor to a coal, so as to cause the resin ta fal Ir the bed, and near the curtains. Br electrica) fui, ?,?men noted the sparhling of their silk strediena it to bed. I sore silk stockings that dar, but did ma ::ths. The clock for figured work) of one of the

which was wretched out, was to be sporchins, and out, was not burnt.*

[ocr errors]

Garte

een.

foot. Electrical snaps and sparks were observed by him to be unusially prevalent when he took off his stockings. He slept until morning, when the silk stockings were found to be converted to coa!, having the semblance of sticks and threads, but falling to pieces on being touched. There was not the least cohesion. One of the slippers, which lay under the stockings, was considerably burned. One of the woolen garters was also burned in pieces. The carpet was burned through to the floor, and the floor itself was scorched to charcoal. It was a case of spontaneous combustion-the candle having been carefully put out, and there being very little fire on the hearth, and both of them being eight or more feet from the stockings. --Dr. Mitchell's Letters from Washington (llarper's Monthly, April, 1879).

" ''ar vururener bis hruppened to lieferał Payton,

ole of the boss legapr Sevatore He puntes de in poder irhich were another pair of woolen pace." The former nee dropped on the smal

, cyta. role and the latter were thrown to soune wi-lance ?rz?.6*

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

neen much able speaking on both sides the question. Jr. G. Morris has shown with distinguished luster. His eloquence has never been surpassed, it is said, in either House of Congress. And perhaps a more interesting subject was never before deliberated by any legislative body in America. The majority in the Senate are impelled by a vindictive, selfish, inflexible spirit, which nothing can resist or moderate. We see how insignificant the best constructed

paper

Constitution will prove when opposed to the interests and passions of men.

The stroke now aimed at the vital principle, which is the Judiciary branch, should it take effect, will prove that ours is is of very little value.

The security of every political Constitution consists in the moral rectitude and sound principles of those who administer it. When these requisites are so defective as to yield to the accommodations of party views and interests, it is mere delusion to expect Constitutional security.

Your aff. parent,

[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

WASHINGTON, Feb. 4, 1802. DR. DANA.

Dear Sir :- I take my pen at this moment just to inform you of the progress of the Judiciary bill in the Senate. On the question for passing the bill to the third reading the yeas were 15 and nays, 15. Of course the Vice-President

gave the casting vote, which was in favor of the bill. Every hope of stopping its progress was given up. The next morning, however, very unexpectedly, a motion was brought forward to inquire whether any, and what, amendments were necessary to be made in the Judiciary system of the United States. On the question, yeas, 15, nays, 15. The Vice-President gave the casting vote in favor of it. A committee of five were chosen, three of whom (to the surprise of all) were warm opposers

of the bill (Mr. Dayton, Calhoun, and Morris). A glimmer of hope now dawned, but soon vanished. Mr. Bradly, who had been absent, arrived, and Mr. Howard happened to be out of

« VorigeDoorgaan »