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cast your lot among a people collected from various parts of the world, bringing with them the sentiments, habits, and manners they had previously contracted. Difficult must be the task of rendering yourself useful and acceptable to them all, while you faithfully discharge the duties of your office. To engage their attention, you must endeavor to acquire their confidence. To recommend religion, and illustrate its amiable tendency, you must persevere in a constant solicitude to promote their best good. Prudence will be indispensably requisite, and without it, every other qualification will be of little avail. You will need the wisdom of the serpent and the innocence of the dove. From the assiduous exertions of the people of your charge to obtain and enjoy the stated ministrations of the gospel, and the pleasing unanimity and affection with which they have elected you to be their pastor, after a probationary trial of more than eight years, you must derive the encouraging hope of their cheerful concurrence in rendering your labors agreeable and successful. May you, on your return to them, be received as an ascension gift of our blessed Lord.

· You have the honor, Sir, to be the first regularly ordained and settled minister of the Congregational denomination in that extensive country westward of the Alleghany Mountains. We who are convinced that this denomination is most conformable to the Sacred Scriptures, and, from long experience, think it most consistent with the rights of conscience and religious liberty, most congenial with our National Government, and most friendly to those numerous municipal advantages which well-formed Christian societies endeavor to promote, feel much satisfaction in seeing it transplanted into that growing country. You, Sir, are going to a country favorable to a high degree of population, capable of supporting, and probably will one day contain inhabitants as numerous as those of the Atlantic States. You are entering on an active scene, and the noblest motives to exertion will continually present themselves to your view. To behold a country which was lately, very lately, a howling wilderness, the gloomy abode of numerous

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!!!akin' hope of their cheerful concurrence in renderlabors agreeable and successful. May you, on your them, be received as an ascension gift of our blessed

Savage tribes, the haunts and lurking-places of the cruel invaders of our defenseless frontiers, regardless of age and sex, sporting with the agonies of captives while expiring under their infernal tortures—a people ignorant of the true God and devoted to their heathen rites and barbarous superstitions ; to see this country so rapidly changing into cultured fields, inhabited by civil and well-regulated societies, peaceably enjoying the fruits of their enterprise, industry, culture, and commerce; to hear the voice of plenty, urbanity, and social enjoyment; above all, to see it illumined by the pure and benevolent religion of the gospel, enjoyed in all its regular ministrations and divine ordinances. To behold scenes and events like these, My Brother, are not merely pleasing contemplations, they are animating motives to zeal and activity in your ministerial labors. It would have afforded great additional happiness to have seen the savage tribes converted to the Christian faith, but it gives much satisfaction, and may prepare the way for the introduction of the gospel among them, that a peace, wise and just in its principles, and which promises a permanent duration, has been concluded with them. Government having fairly and honorably purchased of them their right to the soil, they are quietly retreating to distant parts of the wilderness. I can not forbear reminding you, my dear sir, that on the very ground where you are statedly to dispense the gospel you behold those ancient ruins, those extended walls and elevated mounds, which were erected many years ago. These works must have required for years the labors of thousands, and are certain indications that vast numbers of the natives once inhabited this place. When these antiquities are minutely examined, they induce a belief that part of them, at least, are the monuments of ancient superstition. Their temples and their idols were probably placed on the elevated square mounds, where the ceremonies of their gloomy, heathenish devotions were performed. On these mounds, in all probability, numerous human sacrifices have been offered. May we adore that Providence which is now planting on this memorable spot the evangelical religion of Jesus. Here may it be permanently established, and may its benign influence be extended throughout every part of the American world. Here

Te the honor, Sir, to be the first regularly ordained i minister of the Congregational denomination in sve country westward of the Alleghany Mountains. p convinced that this denomination is most conthe Sacred Scriptures, and, from long experience, nt consistent with the rights of conscience and re15, most congenial with our National Government, jenills to those numerous municipal advantages rmed Christian societies endeavor to promote, feel ction in seeing it transplanted into that growing

11, Sir, are going to a country farorable to a high ulation, capable of supporting, and probably will in inhabitants as numerous as those of the At

You are entering on an active scene, and the to exertion will continually present themselves To behold a country which was lately, very sue wilderness, the gloomy abode of numerous

work to which you are this day solemnly consecrated, well may you ask: Who is sufficient for these things ? Trust not in your own strength, but in Him whose grace is sufficient for you. Feel the influence, not merely of those local considerations which your particular situation so naturally suggests, but of those great truths and momentous concerns which the gospel will continually present to your view. You are now about to take your leave, probably a final leave of your nearest connections. May the painful hour of parting with them be cheered by the reflection that you are going on a great and useful, an honorable and glorious errand, a work which holy angels would with pleasure perform. Those benevolent spirits who sang praises to God in the highest, because there was on earth, peace and good will toward men, would cheerfully be employed in turning men from the error of their ways, and saving sonls from death. .

Go, then, my Friend, and the God of peace be with you.

NOTE TO DR. CUTLER'S CHARGE AT THE ORDINATION OF REV. DAN

IEL STORY, AUGUST 15, 1798. Vestiges of ancient works, of which the present natives retain no tradition, are found in various parts of the western territory. Of those that have yet been discovered, the works at Marietta are of the greatest magnitude. Their situation is on an elevated plain. They consist of walls and mounds of earth, in direct lines, and in square and in circular forms. The largest square contains 40 acres. On each side are three openings, at equal distances, resembling twelve gateways. The smallest square contains 20 acres, with a gateway in the center of each side. At the angles of the squares are openings similar to those at the sides. The walls, which were made of earth, were not thrown up from ditches, but raised by bringing the earth from some distant place, or taking it up uniformly from the surface of the plain. They were probably made of equal height and breadth, but the waste of time had

others. By an accurate measurement they were found to be

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from 4 to 8 feet in height, and from 25 to 26 feet, at the base, in breadth. Two parallel walls, running from an angle of the largest square toward the Muskingum River, which seemed to have been designed for a covered way, were 175 feet distant from each other, and measured on the inner side, in the most elevated part, 24 feet in height, and 42 feet broad at the base. Within and contiguous to the squares, are many elevated mounds, of a conic form and of different magnitudes. The most remarkable of the mounds within the walls are three, of an oblong square form, in the great square. The largest of these is 188 feet in length, 100 feet in width, and 9 feet in height, level on the summit, and nearly perpendicular at the sides. At the center of each of the sides the earth is projected, forming gradual ascents to the summit, extremely regular, and about 6 feet in width Near the smallest square is a mound raised in the form of a sugar-loaf, of a magnitude that strikes the beholder with astonishment. Its base is a regular circle, 115 feet in diameter, and is 30 feet in altitude. It is surrounded by a ditch, at the distance of 33 feet from its base, 15 feet wide, and 4 feet deep, forming a bank 4 feet in height, leaving an opening or gateway, toward the square, about 20 feet wide. Besides these, there are other works, but the limits of this note will not admit of a description.

At the commencement of the settlement (at Marietta) the whole of these works were covered by a prodigious growth of trees. When I arrived, the ground was in part cleared, but many large trees remained on the walls and mounds. The only possible data for forming any probable conjecture respecting the antiquity of the works, I conceived, must be derived from the growth upon them. By the concentric circles, each of which contains the annual growth, the ages of the trees might be ascertained. For this purpose a number of the trees were felled, and in the presence of Governor St. Clair and many other gentlemen, the number of circles were carefully counted. The trees of the greatest size were hollow. In the largest of those which were sound, there were from three to four hundred circles. One tree, somewhat decayed at the center, was found to contain at least four hundred and sixty-three circles. Its age was undoubtedly more than 463 years. Other trees, in a

SPRE AT THE ORDINATION OF RET. DAN:

P R ), AUGUST 15, 1798.
.: 91:.: tks, of which the present natives re-
. .. 11P fold in various parts of the western

etist lave ret been discovered, the works
1. Ofte seatest magnitude. Their situation

14. Trier consist of walls and mounds of - les, and in square and in circular forms.

trentains 40 acres. On each side are three 1.7"!! distances, resembling twelve gateways.

are contains 20 acres, with a gateway in the -le. At the angles of the squares are open: se at the sides. The walls, which were made

runn up from ditches, but raised by bringProin some distant place, or taking it up uniil vurface of the plain. They were probably

Wht and breadth, but the waste of time had I lower and broader in some parts than in

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1 accurate measurement they were found to be

wich, concluded with prayer.

“ The assembly was numerous and attentive. It gave pleasure to every benevolent mind to learn that a respectable church and congregation have been formed in that distant settlement, and that they are happily united in the choice of so worthy a gentleman as their minister, who, it is not doubted, will do honor to his profession, and contribute to the virtue and happiness of those enterprising sons of our country under whose culturing hands the wilderness has been literally changed into a fruitful field and the desert made to blossom as the rose.”

With a rare spirit of self-sacrifice, Mr. Story returned to Marietta, to encounter the hardships incident, even in time of peace, to a frontier post. Placed among a people impoverished by the long Indian war, and scarcely able to provide for their own families, he was not disposed to press his personal claims. It was expected that the rental of the section of land set apart for the support of the Gospel would be added to his meager salary, and thus a comfortable support be assured; but, from various causes, little was available from this source. He continued his services as pastor of the church until the 15th of March, 1804, when, his health being too much impaired to admit of the performance of the duties of his vocation, he was dismissed at his own request, and died December 30, 1804, aged 49 years, and was buried in the beautiful Mound Cemetery of Marietta. Mr. Story never married. Perhaps few know or appreciate his sacrifices, or the difficulties to which he was reduced. Dr. Hildreth, in his Lives of the Early Settlers, says of him: “He spent not only his life, but all his substance, in the service of the cause to which he was devoted.”

The next subject which occupied Dr. Cutler's attention was the organizing of the University.

In a letter to Dr. Cutler, dated February 3, 1799, General Putnam writes :

That you may have data on which to make your calculations, the following statement may not be useless :

The two University townships contain 46,880 acres. For

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