The History and Proceedings of the House of Commons from the Restoration to the Present Time ... Illustrated with a Great Variety of Historical and Explanatory Notes ... with a Large Appendix ...

Couverture
R. Chandler, 1742
0 Avis
Les avis ne sont pas validés, mais Google recherche et supprime les faux contenus lorsqu'ils sont identifiés
 

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Aucun commentaire n'a été trouvé aux emplacements habituels.

Pages sélectionnées

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 21 - England does not dare to make it. And what is a delay, which is all this magnified Convention is sometimes called, to produce? Can it produce such conjunctures as those...
Page 21 - But be it what it will, is this any longer a nation, or what is an English parliament, if with more ships in your harbours than in all the navies of Europe, with above two millions of people in your American colonies, you will bear to hear of the expediency of receiving from Spain an insecure, unsatisfactory, dishonourable convention?
Page 22 - ... pounds, and that too subject to a drawback,) it is evidently a fallacious nominal payment only. I will not attempt to enter into the detail of a dark, confused, and scarcely intelligible account...
Page 21 - ... America ; but does a man in Spain reason that these pretensions must be regulated to the satisfaction and honour of England ? No, Sir, they conclude, and with reason, from the high spirit of their administration, from the superiority with which they have so long treated you, that this reference must end, as it has begun, to their honour and advantage. " But, gentlemen say, the treaties subsisting are to be the measure of this regulation. Sir, as to treaties, I will take part of the words of Sir...
Page 21 - I can pretend to add nothing to the conviction and indignation it has raised. Sir, as to the great national objection, the searching your ships, that favourite word, as it was called, is not omitted, indeed, in the preamble to the convention, but it stands there as the reproach of the whole, as the strongest evidence of the fatal submission that follows : on the part...
Page 22 - Convention. This Convention, Sir, I think from my soul is nothing but a stipulation for national ignominy; an illusory expedient to baffle the resentment of the nation; a truce without a suspension of hostilities on the part of Spain; on the part of England a suspension, as to Georgia, of the first law of nature, self-preservation and self-defence...
Page 184 - Handel reserving to himself only the liberty of performing the same for his own benefit during his life: And whereas, the said benefaction cannot be secured to the sole use of your petitioners except by the authority of Parliament, your petitioners therefore humbly pray that leave may be given to bring in a bill for the purposes aforesaid.
Page 57 - Succefs ; if the People fhould not implicitly refign their Reafon to a Vote of this Houfe, what will be the Confequence ? Will not the Parliament lofe its Authority ? Will it not be thought, that, even in Parliament, we are governed by a FaStion?
Page 23 - Parliament and the gracious promise of the throne. The complaints of your despairing merchants, — the voice of England has condemned it. Be the guilt of it upon the head of the adviser: God forbid that this Committee should share the guilt by approving it...
Page 21 - ... the house of Bourbon is united, who knows the consequence of a war ? Sir, Spain knows the consequence of a war in America ; whoever gains, it must prove fatal to her : she knows it, and must therefore avoid it ; but she knows England does not dare to make it.

Informations bibliographiques