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14. Character of Julius Cæsar,

Middleton,

15. On mispent tine,

Guardian, 94

16. Character of Francis I.

Robertson,

97

17. The supper and grace,

Sterne,

100

18. Rustic felicity,

19. House of mourning,

ibid.

ib.

SECTION III.

1. The honour and advantage of a constant

adherence to truth,

Percival's Tales, 104

2. Impertinence in discourse,

Theophrastus, ib.

3. Character of Addison as a writer,

Johnson, 105

4. Pleasure and pain,

Spectator, 106

5. Sir Roger de Coverly's family,

ibid.

108

6. The folly of inconsistent expectations, Aitken, 110

7. Description of the vale of Keswick, in

Cumberland,

Brown,

112

8. Pity, an Allegory,

Aitken,

115

9. Advantages of commerce,

Spectator, 116

10. On public speaking,

ibid. 118

11. Advantages of history,

Hume,

120

12. On the immortality of the soul,

Spectator,

122

13. The combat of the Horatii and the

Curiatii,

Lidy,

124

14. On the power of custom,

Spectator,

126

15. On pedantry,

Mirror, 123

16 The journey of a day-a picture of

human life,

Rambler,

130

SECTION IV.

1. Description of the amphitheatre of Titus,

Gibbon,

133

2. Reflections in Westminster Abbey,

Spectator, 134

3. The character of Mary queen of Scots,

Robertson, 137

4. The character of queen Elizabeth,

Hume, 138

5. Charles V's cesignation of his dominions, Robertson, 140

6. Importance of virtue,

Price,

143

7. Address to art,

Hurris,

144

& Flattery,

Theophrastus, 146

9. The absent man,

Spectator, 147

10. The Monk,

Sterne,

148

11, On the head-dress of the ladies,

Spectator, 150

12. On the

present and future state,

ibid.

153

13. Uncle Toby's benevolence,

Sterne, 155

14. Story of the siege of Calais,

Fool of quality, 156

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1. Lamentation for the loss of sight,

2. L'Allegro, or the merry man,

3. On the pursuits of mankind,

4. Adam and Eve's morning hymn,

5. Parting of Hector and Andromache,

6. Facetious history of John Gilpin,

7. The creation of the world,

8. Overthrow of the rebel angels,

3. Alexander's feast, or the power of music,

ibid. 229

Pope, 231

Milion, 233

Homer, 234

Cowper, 237
Milton, 242
ibid. 243
Dryden, 244

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4. Boniface and Aimwell,

Beau: Stratagem, 311

5. Lovegold and Lappet,

Miser,

313

6. Cardinal Wolsey and Cromwell,

Henry VIII. 317

7. Sir Charles and Lady Racket, Three Weeks after Marriage, 320

8. Brutus and Cassius,

Shakespeare's Julius Cæsar, 323

11.–SPEECHES AND SOLILOQUIES.

1. Hamlet's advice to the players, Tragedy of Hamlet, 326

2. Douglas' account of himself, Tragedy of Douglas, 327

3.

the hermit,

ibid.

328

4. Sempronius' speech for war,

Tragedy of Cato, ib.

5. Lucius' speech for peace,

ibid.

329

6. Hotspur's account of the fop,

1 Henry the IV. ib.

7.

soliloquy on the contents of a letter, ibid. 330

8. Othello's apology for his marriage, Tragedy of Othello, 331

9. Henry IV's soliloquy on sleep, 2 Henry the IV. 332

10. Bobadil's method of defeating an

army,

Every man in his humour, ib.

11. Soliloquy of Hamlet's uncle on

the murder of his brother, Tragedy of Hamlet, 333

12. Soliloquy of Hamlet on death,

ibid.

334

13. Falstaff's encomiums on sack, 2 Henry the IV.

335

14. Prologue to the tragedy of Cato,

Pope,

ib.

15. Cato's soliloquy on the immortality

of the soul,

Tragedy of Cato, 336

16. Lady Randolph's soliloquy, Tragedy of Douglas, 337

17. Speech of Henry V. at the siege
of Harfleur,

Shakespeare's Henry V. ib.

18.

before the battle of Agincourt, ibid.

338

19. Soliloquy of Dick the apprentice, Farce of the Apprentice, 339

20. Cassius instigating Brutus to join the

conspiracy against Cæsar, Tragedy of Julius Cæsar, 340

21. Brutus’ barangue on the death of Cæsar,

ibid.

341

22. Antony's oration over Cæsar's body,

ibid.

342

23. Falstaff's soliloquy on honour,

Henry IV. 344

24. Part of Richard III's soliloquy the night preceding

the battle of Bosworth, Tragedy of Richard III. ib.

25. The world compared to a stage,

As you like it, ib.

APPENDIX—Containing concise lessons on a new plan,

346

Rules for pronouncing Greek and Latin proper names, Walker, 361

Pronunciation of Greek and Latin namos,

ibid.

365

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THOUGH the merit of the Lessons, a new edition of which is now presented to the public, is well appreciated, yet complaints have been made, and very justly, that most of the editions, in common use, are not only badly executed, but extremely incorrect. The present. edition, it is believed, will be found free from both these objections. Its typographical execution addresses itself to the eye, and cannot fail, it is thought, to make such an impression, as will supersede the necessity of verbal commendation. And it is presumed, that on examination, it's correctness will be found to be equal to its mechanical execution, the greatest care having been given to produce an accurate, as well as a handsome edition of the work.

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