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two great nations should be so morally vitiated and depraved, -80 corrupt and corrupting in ther character? Why is it, that wherever they go, they are entailing a curse on the native population of the various countries ;--and, positively endangering some of the missionary stations, ou which wo have been accustomed to look with such interest ? These are questions which we leave the churches of both lands to answer, as they shall have to give account to God.

Appeal has followed appeal on this subject, to the Committee of the British and Foreign Sailors' Society in London, and to the Board of the American Scamen's Friend Society in New York, but they have been under the painful necessity of replying—“We have not funds to enable us to send a seamen's chaplain to every foreign port; we cannot even occupy the fields which are now open before us at home! It is evident from their statements, that they have felt the force of the appeal which has beeu made to them; and most bitterly mourned over the evil. But the remedy is not in their hands. It renains with the Christian community of both countries, to supply the necessary resources. Till this is done, the churches of Britain and America must be he!d at fault. But let these Societies, which profess to provide for the moral necessities of the sailor, possess the adequate funds, and the responsibility will rest with them. Theirs will be the guilt, if, humanly speaking, this torrent of iniquity is not arrested in its progress.

We therefore recur to our former question,– What is to be done? To leave things as they are, would be to aggravate our guilt. An effort must be made to destroy this giant evil. And, under this impression we submit, whether it is not the duty of ull the great Bible and Missionary Institutions in Britain and Americu, to publish the naked fucts of the cuse, and keep them befiore the Christian church, by reiterating them from the pulpit, the plutförm, anul the press, till every Christin fe Is it a solemn obliyation, enforced by the authority of high Fleuven, that he should, to the utmost of his ability, muke provision for the morul recovery of these men.

Further,—would it not be perfectly legitimate, and likely to secure an important end, if these great institutions were to instruct their various agents, who may be stutioned in uny foreign port, to direct special attention to the seamen who may visit such ports, und bring their ayency und influence to beur on their moral circumstances. A very large amount of good might thus be effected. And just in proportion to the chunge produced in the churcter of the sailor, would be the probubility of religion and purity beiny extensively promoted annong the inhabitants of tisse iands, on whose shores they so frequently touch. The virtue of the suilor would reprove and check the vice of the nutive. And instead of giving countenance and support to all that is durk unul revolting in humun conduci, he would employ every energy, to bring the perishing heuthen into the way of peuce.

An island is found in a state of healthy prosperity, “ BECAUSE there is no harbour for shipping there !" What a volume is embodied in this single sentence, and how full of meaning !

Boards of Missions - Constituted to represent and act for the church of Christ! You aro most decply involved in this subject. The darling object of your hearts, is bere at stake. Is it not in your power, to a very large extent, to prevent and ward off the calamity which threatens somo of the most interesting and promising missionary stations abroad? Will you, then, longer suffer to leave your shores in thousands, men, whose influence must act like the most deadly agencies on every heathen settlement, and endanger your missions on every shore?

MINISTERS OF CHRIST!-Captains of the army of the redeemed, who are leading them on to conquest and glory !-- will you allow the laurels, for which the church has so nobly fought, and which she has so honourably won, to be torn from her brow with a rude band, and trampled uuder fvot?

Churches of Christ !- Conservators of the world will you not interpose, and by an enlightened and united effort, seck to bring seamen under the puritying influence of the gospel, that they may no longer be “the savour of death unto death " among the heathen?

The power is in Your labour in the Lord will not be in vain. The salvation of scamen, will be not only the safest guard and protection to your missions, but the precursor of the world's salvatiou !

ENGLAND AND AMERICA! The two first nations on earth in moral power !— Will you not combine and pledge this power, first to rescue the sailor from his own personal degradation and misery, and then, through his salvation, seek to save your missious,-redeem the race,—and bless the world.

R. FERGUSON. British and Foreign Sailors' Society's Rooms,

2, Jeffrey-square, St. Mary Axe.

LONDON, JUNE, 1839.

your bands.

6

on shore, and sold it to the natives. This revived their dorinant appetito, and like pent-up waters, the disposition burst fortlı, and with the impetuosity of a resistless torrent carried the people before it, so that they appeared maddened with infatuation. I could scarcely imagine that they were the same persons among whom I had lived so long, and of whom I had thought so highly."

Nor is this the sum of even Mr. Williams' testimony. At a public meeting in this metropolis, he thus expressed himself :

“Only think, what would be the effect upon your missionary stations, if every ship that visited them carried pious captains, officers, and men ! Instead of which they come to our beautiful islands, looking forward to the gratification of every vile passion, and at times there is an inundation of wickedness brought upon us by them. Some time ago a captain visited our island, and procured a number of native females, wlion he took on board his ship, and carried them fifteen miles off. The native authorities followed him, and demanded their restoration, but instead of giving them up, he actually loaded a cannon, and fired five balls at the chupel and settlement !"+

Iinpressed and pained with these facts, (as well they might) the Directors of the London Missionary Society addressed the following letter in 1833, to the Board of the British and Foreign Sailors' Society :

“ DEAR SIRS, – You will doubtless have seen, from some of the publications of the London Missionary Society, the demoralization produced at some of the islands of the South Seas, by the increased use of ardent spirits, large quantities of which have been imported by our countrymen and Americans, and hawked about the settlements, as well as sold in barrels. Recent accounts from the South Sea Islands are, in reference to this subject, most discouraging. Our brethren stato that the besetting siu in Tahiti, at present, is drunkenness; that it had produced the greatest mischief in the churches; and this state of things, which fills the Directors with the greatest distress, is attributed greatly to Anuerican and British sailors, who have established a puniber of grog-shops ou sbore for retailing spirits, and who have induced the chiefs to beconie traffickers iu rum.

“ The extent and disastrous operation of this immoral habit, has led the Directors to derise and apply the most suitable remedies; and, among others, they have instructed me to make this communication to you, directing your attention, at the same time, to the baneful influence of seamen on Foreign Missions, and inviting your prompt and efficieat exertions, especially in behalf of seamen visiting the South Sea Islands, that they may become instructed, reformed, and improved, and go forth to other countries, as interesting samples of the British Nation,—the BRITISH CHARACTER.

“I am, my Dear Sirs,

“ Your faithful Friend and Servant,

“J. ARUNDEL, Home Secretary." But what is to be done? The evil exists ; how is it to be remedied? It has been suggested, that every thing possible should be done “ to put a stop to a traffic, which entails so much wretchedness and evil." But this would not reach the case. It might restrict the evil, but not remove it. The natives have most unbappily contracted a taste for strong drink, and have been taught to

couvert even their bread-fruit into ardent spirit by distillation." Suppose then the traffic were to cease, and every merchant were to abandon the trade, the natives have now, to a great extent, the means of supply within themselves. Besides, there is another source from which this deadly liquid may be obtained. “ Though the use of ardent spirits is forbidden in some islands, and though destroyed when found, yet there are too many who carry on the trade in an underhand manner." It is supplied also from the various ships who visit the islands, not excepting those which aro denominated TEMPERANCE SHIPS! What a foul blot on the national character of the two countries!“Tell it not in Gath."

It appears, then, that the great source of the evil lies with those "who go down to the sea in ships," — with British and American sailors,—that their intercourse with the natives, has been the cause of the wide-spread misery in these islands. As soon as an English or an American ship conies in sight, instead of hailing, or being gratified by its approach, the missionary deprecates and dreads it. The conduct of the scamen sickens his very heart, and stands as the most formidable obstacle, and most painful trial in his path. How is this? How is it, that the seamen of these

Missionary Enterprises, by the Rev. John Williams, pp. 465 and 405, 406. + In addition to this we have the concurrent testimony of both Church and Wes. aries, and equally affecting intelligence from other parts of the world.

mission

two great nations should be so morally vitiated and depraved, — 80 corrupt and corrupting in ther character? Why is it, that wherever they go, they are entailing a curse on the uative population of the various countries ;-and, positively endangering some of the missionary stations, on which we have been accustomed to look with such interest ? These are questions which we leave the churches of both lands to answer, as they shall have to give account to God.

Appeal has followed appeal on this subject, to the Committee of the British and Foreign Sailors' Society in London, and to the Board of the American Scamen's Friend Society in New York, but they have been under the painful necessity of replying—“We have not funds to enable us to send a seamen's chaplain to every foreign port; we cannot even occupy the fields which are now open before us at home! It is evident from their statements, that they have felt the force of the appeal which has beeu made to them; and most bitterly mourned over the evil. But the remedy is not in their hands. It renains with the Christian community of both countries, to supply thie necessary resources. Till this is done, the churches of Britain and America must be he!d at fault. But let these Societies, which profess to provide for the moral necessitics of the sailor, possess the adequate funds, and the responsibility will rest with them. Theirs will be the guilt, if, humanly speaking, this torrent of iniquity is not arrested in its progress.

We therefore recur to our former question, — What is to be done? To leave things as they are, would be to aggravate our guilt. An effort must be made to destroy this giant evil. And, unler this impression we sulmit

, whether it is not the duty of ull the great Bible and Missionary Institutions in Britain and Americu, to publish the naked fucts of the cuse, and keep them before the Christian church, by reiterating them from the pulpit, the plutform, and the press, til every Christiun fe ls it a solemn obliyution, enforced by the authority of high leuven, that he should, to the utmost of nis ability, muke provision for the morul recovery of these men.

Further,—would it not be perfectly legitimate, and likely to secure an important end, if these great instilutions were lo instruct their various agents, who muy be stutioned in uny foreign port, to direct speciul attention to the seamen who muy risit such ports, und bring their ayency und influence to beur on their moral circumstances. A very large amount of good might thus be effectent. And just in proportion to the chunye produced in the churuter of the suilor, would be the probability of religion and purity being extensively promoted among the inhabitants of tiose iands, on whose shores they so frequently touch. The virtue of the suilor would reprore and check the vice of the nutive. And instead of giving countenance and support to all that is durk unut revolting in humun conduct, he would employ every energy, to bring the perishing heuthen into the way of peace. An island is found in a state of healthy prosperity, “ BECAUSE there is no harbour for shipping

What a volume is embodied in this single sentence, and how full of neaning! BOARDS OF Missions !- Constituted to represent and act for the church of Christ!

You are most decply involved in this subject. The darling object of your hearts, is here at stake. Is it not

your power, to a very large extent, to prevent and ward off the calamity which threatens some of the most interesting and promising missionary stations abroad? Will you, then, longer suffer to leave your shores in thousands, men, whose influence must act like the most deadly agencies on every heathen settlement, and endanger your missions on every shore ?

MINISTERS OF CHRIST!—Captains of the army of the redeemed, who are leading them on to conquest and glory !- will you allow the laurels, for which the church has so nobly fought, and which she has so honourably won, to be torn from her brow with a rude band, and trampled under

there !"

in

foot ?

Churches of Christ !-Conservators of the world !--Will you not interpose, and by an enlightened and united effort, seek to bring seamen under the puritying influence of the gospel, that they may no longer be the savour of death unto death " among the heathen? The power is in your hands. Your labour in the Lord will not be in vain. The salvation of scamen, will be not ouly the safest guard and protection to your missions, but the precursor of the world's salvation !

ENGLAND AND AMERICA! The two first nations on earth in moral power !—Will you not combine and pledge this power, first to rescue the sailor from his own personal degradation and misery, and then, through his salvation, seek to save your missious,-redeem the race,--and bless

the world.

R. FERGUSON.

British and Foreign Sailors' Society's Rooms, 2, Jeffrey-square, St. Mary Axe.

LONDON, JUNE, 1839.

Since many will doub:less be induced from these statements, (who have never hitherto done so,) 10 lend their aici in attempting radically to improve and elevate the character of the British sailor, and since those who are now engaged, may be constrained to renew their energies and double their efforts, we deem it advisable to introduce a notice of the Institution, which more especially proposes 18 its end the moral renovation of our seamen. Its claims are powerful, and sooner or later they must be met.

CONSTITUTION AND OBJECTS

OF THE

BRITISH AND FOREIGN SAILORS' SOCIETY. The Society shall comprehend all denominations of Christians, holding the essential doctrines of the Protestant faith.

The affairs of the Society shall be managed by a Board of Directors, chosen annually at the general meeting of the Subscribers.

All agents of the Society shall be chosen by the Directors.

That every annual Subscriber of One Guinea, shall be a member of this Society; and that Ladies subscribing Five Guineas, and Gentlemen 'Ten Guineas, shall be members for Life.

That each Subscriber of One Guinea, and Collectors of Two Guineas, shall be entitled to the Society's publications.

Every minister, giving a collection to the Society, shall be at liberty to attend the meetings of the Committee.

A report of the proceedings of the Committee, with an audited statement of the finances of the Society, shall be presented every year to the general meeting.

Truly catholic and enlarged are the objects which the Society embraces :-By establishing the preaching of the gospel on ship-board, and on shore, throughout the port of London ;-by a system of constant visitation amongst the scamen, calling their attention to the truths of religion, furnishing copies of the sacred Scriptures, as also books and tracts of a truly evangelical character, (to effect which the Society employs faithful, well-known, and acceptable teachers to attend the Bethel meetings, and Thames Missionaries to visit seainen on their arrival in port, in the several docks, in the Boarding houses, and when about to leave ;)—by day and sunday-schools, for the education of the children of seamen and watermen ;-by furnishing ship-libraries of religious books on loan, to vessels bound to foreign parts ;-hy providing agents in the provincial ports of Great Britain and Ireland, and aiding local associations in prosecuting the great objects of the Society, by grants of money, books, tracts, and Bethel flags ;-by engaging missionaries on remote stations of maritimo importance ;—by providing chaplains for the most frequented foreign ports ; and co-operating in every practicable manner with the friends of seamen throughout the world, especially American Seamen's Friend Society."

President.
THE RIGHT HONOURABLE LORD MOUNTSANDFORD.

“The

Vice-Presidents,

SIR CULLING EARDLEY SMITH, BART.
REAR ADM. SIR JAMES HILLYAR, G. C. B., G. R. ROBINSON, ESQ.,
REAR ADMIRAL W. YOUNG,

W. THOMPSON, ESQ., ALDERMAN, M. Pog
CAPTAIN SIR W. E. PARRY, K. C. B., R. N., R. H. MARTEN, ESQ.,
GEORGE FREDERICK YOUNG, ESQ.,

THOMAS WILSON, BSQ.

Treasurers,

I GEORGE FIFR ANGAS, E6Q.

JOHN PIRIE, ESQ., ALDERMAN,

Secretaries,

1 REV. THOMAS TIMPSON.

FEV. ROBERT FERGUSON,

SOCIETY'S ROOMS, 2, JEFFREY-SQUARE, ST. MARY AXB.

SOLD BY MESSRS. WARD & CO., PATERNOSTER-ROW.

PRICE 2d. or 14s. per 100.

W. Tyler, Printer, 5, Bolt-court, London.

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In an 'article on the Ark, or Floating-chapel, we traced this history up to the time when the vessel purchased and prepared for a sanctuary was moored in the Thames, and solemnly dedicated to the service of God. To that memorable period many still living look back with peculiar interest, and on the glad scenes which then took place their imagination loves to linger. To many, the events of that day will constitute some of the most pleasing reminiscences of life, and be among the most grateful recollections of immortality.

The effort then made in London became known throughout the kingdom, and on the other side of the wide Atlantic. Corresponding measures were immediately adopted in several of our provincial ports, in England and Wales, Scotland and Ireland; nor did our American brethren linger in the rear. A new impetus was given to the christian mind, and there was a spontaneous movement in favour of the sailor. Place provoked place, and nation emulated with nation to provide for his moral instruction-his education for eternity. And had no unpropitious circumstance ever arisen to impede and endanger the work, (which was scarcely to be expected in this imperfect state, and amid the ignorance and infirmities of human nature, there can be no doubt but the sailor's cause would have now possessed that place in the public estimation to which it is pre-eminently entitled.

Still the work proceeded; and in November, 1819, some individuals, contemplating a wider field of exertion, associated toge

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