Images de page
PDF
ePub

ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT

APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1988

SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT
TOM BEVILL, Alabama, Chairman

LINDY (MRS. HALE) BOGGS, Louisiana JOHN T. MYERS, Indiana
BILL CHAPPELL, JR., Florida VIRGINLA SMITH, Nebraska
VIC FAZIO, California CARL D. PURSELL, Michigan

WES WATHINS, Oklahoma
BILL BONER, Tennessee

HUNTER L. SPILLAN, GeoRGE A. URIAN, AARon D. Edmondson, and JoHN MIKEL,
Staff Assistants

Printed for the use of the Committee on Appropriations

[graphic]

COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS JAMIE L. WHITTEN, Mississippi, Chairman

EDWARD P. BOLAND, Massachusetts
WILLIAM H. NATCHER, Kentucky
NEAL SMITH, Iowa
SIDNEY R. YATES, Illinois
DAVID R. OBEY, Wisconsin
EDWARD R. ROYBAL, California
LOUIS STOKES, Ohio
TOM BEVILL, Alabama
BILL CHAPPELL, Jr., Florida
BILL ALEXANDER, Arkansas
JOHN P. MURTHA, Pennsylvania
BOB TRAXLER, Michigan
JOSEPH D. EARLY, Massachusetts
CHARLES WILSON, Texas
LINDY (MRS. HALE) BOGGS, Louisiana
NORMAN D. DICKS, Washington
MATTHEW F. McHUGH, New York
WILLIAM LEHMAN, Florida
MARTIN OLAV SABO, Minnesota
JULIAN C. DIXON, California
VIC FAZIO, California
W. G. (BILL) HEFNER, North Carolina
LES AUCOIN, Oregon
DANIEL K. AKAKA, Hawaii
WES WATKINS, Oklahoma
WILLIAM H. GRAY III, Pennsylvania
BERNARD J. DWYER, New Jersey
BILL BONER, Tennessee
STENY H. HOYER, Maryland
BOB CARR, Michigan
ROBERT J. MRAZEK, New York
RICHARD J. DURBIN, Illinois
RONALD D. COLEMAN, Texas
ALLAN B. MOLLOHAN, West Virginia

SILVIO. O. CONTE, Massachusetts
JOSEPH M. McDADE, Pennsylvania
JOHN T. MYERS, Indiana
CLARENCE E. MILLER, Ohio
LAWRENCE COUGHLIN, Pennsylvania
C. W. BILL YOUNG, Florida
JACK F. KEMP, New York
RALPH REGULA, Ohio
VIRGINIA SMITH, Nebraska
CARL D. PURSELL, Michigan
MICKEY EDWARDS, Oklahoma
BOB LIVINGSTON, Louisiana
BILL GREEN, New York
JERRY LEWIS, California
JOHN EDWARD PORTER, Illinois
HAROLD ROGERS, Kentucky
JOE SKEEN, New Mexico
FRANK R. WOLF, Virginia
BILL LOWERY, California
VIN WEBER, Minnesota
TOM DELAY, Texas
JIM KOLBE, Arizona

FREDERIck G. MoHRMAN, Clerk and Staff Director

ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT
APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1988

Thursday, February 26, 1987. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

WITNESSES

JOHN S. HERRINGTON, SECRETARY OF ENERGY
ELIZABETH E. SMEDLEY, CONTROLLER

Mr. Bevill. The Committee will come to order. Mr. Secretary, we are always pleased to have you appear before us with your fine group. You may proceed as you wish.

Mr. Herrington. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Once again, it is an honor to be in front of this Committee this year. I would like to submit for the record a full statement, with the Chairman's permission.

Mr. Bevill. Without objection, it will be made a part of the record.

[The statement of Secretary Herrington appears at the end of this hearing.]

SECRETARY OF ENERGY

Mr. Herrington. And with a few brief opening remarks, we have with us today, first of all, a number of people, energy program directors.

Mr. Bevill. If you will raise your hand so we can see each of you.

Mr. Herrington. John Meinhardt from the Defense Programs.

Al Trivelpiece, the Secretary's Science Advisor, head of our science research, Dr. Trivelpiece, whom you have seen before.

Mr. Bevill. Many times, and we are always glad to see you.

Mr. Herrington. Donna Fitzpatrick, who is Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy. Dave Rossi n, who is our Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy. Ray Berube, from the Health Environment Office, and Del Bunch who has been intimately involved in the N-Reactor safety program and the upgrades that we are now going through in that particular area. They all appreciate the opportunity to bie here.

Our FY 1988 budget for the Department of Energy meets two important objectives, in my estimation: It continues strong support for essential programs in our energy, science and defense mission areas. And, two, it contributes to our efforts to reduce the growth in the Federal budget, and to meet the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings reduction totals.

(l)

The FY 1988 budget meets our increasing national security requirements. It maintains our commitment to priority programs, such as basic energy science research, environment, safety and health, nuclear safeguards and security, and clean coal technology development. The FY 1988 budget of $13.9 billion, which is a large sum, supports a level of program activity which is essentially unchanged from FY 1987. However, the request for new budget authority is higher in FY 1988, because the funds carried over from prior years are much less than they were in 1987.

The budget reflects recurring policy themes of this Administration: One, confine Federal support to activities which are properly the responsibility of the Federal Government.

Two, improve technology transfer, and obtain meaningful cost sharing with the private sector and with the States.

Three, divest assets which could better be managed by non-Federal entities.

Our budget reflects the Administration's strong support to frontier research and commitment to maintain and strengthen the Nation's scientific leadership and technological competitiveness.

SUPERCONDUCTING SUPER COLLIDER

The most dramatic evidence, of course, of this commitment is President Reagan's recent decision to support construction of the Superconducting Super Collider, the next generation in high energy physics.

This decision ensures that the United States will retain world leadership in high energy physics well into the next century. The site selection process, which you may well wish to ask about, was announced on February 10, at a press conference, and it should lead to a final site selection by, we estimate, January of 1989.

The target completion date for this project is 1996. Other major projects contributing to research efforts include CEBAF, which is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility in the nuclear physics program and the Compact Ignition Tokamak in the magnetic fusion energy program. That, of course, is located in Princeton.

The budget request for the General Science appropriation which supports the SSC, CEBAF and other high technology major research facilities is $815 million. This is a 13 percent increase over the FY 1987 funding level.

ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY AND HEALTH

We continue major efforts that we began in 1985 to identify and correct past problems in the environment, safety and health areas, and to prevent current and future violations of safety and environmental standards in our facilities.

Our budget request for environment, safety and health increases 13 percent, to $70 million, with most of the increase applied to continuing the environmental survey that we started last year, as you remember, and technical safety appraisals of the Department's facilities.

The budget also contains a strong commitment to effective safeguards and securities at all of our facilities.

Mitigating acid rain is another major effort in our area. An initiative which will receive increased emphasis is our effort to find ways to burn coal more cleanly and more efficiently. In addition to a number of advanced techniques being studied in the fossil energy research and development budget we are proposing to increase our clean coal technology activities by drawing on funds in the clean coal reserve to investigate promising retrofit, repowering and modernization technologies.

STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE

Last August, the President affirmed his commitment to our Strategic Petroleum Reserve, and we have been filling that at a rate of 75,000 barrels a day in accordance with a law passed last year.

We have recommended in this budget that the mandated level be reduced to 35,000 barrels a day because of budgetary considerations. The language submitted with this budget authorizes this fill rate without jeopardizing the government's ability to continue producing oil at the Naval Petroleum Reserves.

The Department is renewing its efforts to divest activities which are more appropriately managed by non-Federal entities. In particular, we are proposing legislation authorizing the sale of Federal interest in the Naval Petroleum Reserves Number 1 and Number 3, and legislation authorizing a study of divestiture of the Southeastern Power Administration. Also, we will continue planning activities for the sale of the Alaska Power Administration.

NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES

For budget purposes, it is assumed that the Naval Petroleum Reserves could be sold in FY 1988 for $3.3 billion, with $2.5 billion received in FY 1988 and $.8 billion in FY 1989. However, the FY 1988 budget does contain a full year's funding for the NPR's.

POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS

Two power marketing administration assets are assumed to be sold in FY 1989.

Another initiative affecting the Power Marketing Administrations is repayment reform. The objective is to have debt repayment proceed on a proper, businesslike basis. While this initiative will not affect the level of Federal funding in support of the Power Marketing Administrations, it will assure that repayment of the Federal investment in the PMA facilities will occur on a timely, stable and predictable basis. Repayment reform will not increase interest costs or the total Federal investment to be repaid.

At this point, I would like to touch briefly on budgets for selected program areas. The FY 1988 budget request for fossil energy, conservation, research and development, solar and other renewables is consistent with our FY 1987 request to you.

We believe that adequate funds are being directed to the highest priority activities. The private sector can and should provide financial support for projects involving a proprietary product or process development. We are proposing to limit conservation grant funding

« PrécédentContinuer »