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fore, the author can be in no sense whatever re- for a curious and exciting narrative from the hero of

June. Godfrey Cavaignac, his brother, was one of

the wittiest and sternest of republican writers under A late number of the London Leader in a review | Louis Philippe-and his own avowed opinions were of Herman Melville's Moby Dick, or the Whale, the cause of much suspicion to the government, though says, “Want of originality has long been the just his brilliant exploits in Algiers rendered it impossible and standing reproach to American literature; the to keep him down. Of course, however, the chief best of its writers were but second-hand English- interest of his memoirs would centre in the pages men. Of late some have given evidence of original. deroted to his share in events subsequent to 1848. ity; not absolute originality, but such genuine outcoming of the American intellect as can be safely A lotter-writer from Paris to a London journal, called national. Edgar Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, presents some sound comments on the recent infaand Herman Melville are assuredly no British off-mous law for the suppression of the freedom of the shoots ; nor is Emerson-the German American that press : “President Bonaparte has this day promul he is! The observer of this commencement of an gated his long-expected law on the press. It is of American literature, properly so called, will notice unexampled harshness and oppression. Old Draco as significant that these writers have a wild and himself, if living in these days, would not have made mystic love of the super-sensual, peculiarly their own. it so atrociously severe. It ruins newspaper and To move a horror skillfully, with something of the periodical proprietors; it strips editors, and writers, earnest faith in the Unseen, and with weird imagery and reporters of the means of obtaining their bread 10 shape these phantasms so vividly that the most by their honest industry; it altogether annihilates incredulous mind is hushed, absorbed—to do this no the political press. And not content with this, it European pen has apparently any longer the power prohibits the entrance into France of foreign political -to do this American literature is without a rival. journals and periodicals, without the special author. What romance writer can be named with Haw ization of the government. THORNE? Who knows the horrors of the seas like "A few months ago the number of daily political Herman MELVILLE?"

newspapers in Paris exceeded thirty; it now does

not amount to ten, and of these ten some are certain A bill has been introduced by the Lord Advocate to disappear in the course of a short time. It is a for abolishing tests in the Scottish universities for very moderate computation to suppose that each one all professional chairs but those of the theological of the twenty and odd suppressed journals gave reg. faculties. At present every professor, before inducular employment at good salaries to ten literary men, tion, is required by law to sign the Westminster as editors, contributors, reporters, correspondents, or Confession of Faith, and the other formularies of the critics, and that each one afforded occasional emScottish Established Kirk. In many cases the sig- ployment to at least the same number of feuilletonnature is not actually required, or it is given as a istes. Here, then, we have upward of twice two mere matter of form. Many of the most distinguished hundred men, who, as regards intelligence, are of the professors in Scotland do not belong to the Estab- élite of society, suddenly deprived of the means lished Church of that country.

whereby they lived,' without any fault of their own.

What is to become of them? What of their helpless Count DE MONTALEMBERT's formal reception as wives and families ? Few of them have any aptitude a Member of the Académie Française took place on for any other calling, and even if they had, what the 5th of February; and as an event of literary chance have they, in this overstocked world, of find and political importance, excited extraordinary sen- ing vacant places? The contemplation of their sation. The salle of the Academy was thronged to misery must wring every heart, and the more so as, excess by the élite of Parisian society, and hundreds from a certain fierté they all possess, they feel it with who had obtained tickets were unable to secure ad peculiar bitterness. But, after all, they are but a mission. As usual on such occasions, the Count de- small portion of the unfortunates who are ruined by livered an harangue, the text of which was the merits, the ruining of the press : there are the compositors, real or supposed, of the deceased member to whose who must exceed two thousand in number; there chair he succeeded-but the burden of which was an are the news-venders, who must amount to hundreds exposition of the Count's opinions on things political, there are the distributors, and the publishers, and the and things in general. As usual, also, one of the clerks, and all the various dependents of a jourral, Academicians replied by a complimentary discourse to who must amount to hundreds more-all, like Othelthe new member, and it so chanced that the respond-lo, now exclaiming, “My occupation's gone.' And ent was no less a personage than M. Guizot. These then paper-makers and type-founders must surely two distinguished men are what the French call find work slacker and wages lower, now that the eagles of eloquence,” and under any circumstance newspapers are dead. And then, again, the cafés the liveliest interest would have been felt to see the and the reading-rooms-a very legion-can they do two noble birds take an oratorical flight; but on this the same amount of business when they have no occasion it was immensely increased, by the fact that newspapers to offer? I wonder whether the French they are recognized chiefs of two different creeds in Dictator has ever thought of the wide-spread misery religion, the Catholic and the Protestant; of two hos. he has occasioned, and is causing, by his enmity to tile political parties, that of absolutism, and that of the press. It may be doubted-else, perhaps, he liberty; and of two contending schools in philosophy, would never, from motives of personal or political one, which imposes authority on the mind of man, the convenience, have annihilated such an important other, which maintains his right to free examination. branch of human industry, which gave bread to tens

of thousands. It is a fine thing to have a giant's CAVAIGNAC is stated to be employing the leisure strength, but tyrannous to use it as a giant." of his voluntary exile in writing his own memoirs.

This may be one of the mere rumors which float idly The German papers say that Dr. MEINHOLD, the about in an age of interrupted sequence and disturbed author of the Amber Witch, has left among his papers action · but should it prove true, the public may hope an unfinished manuscript, entitled “ Haçar and the

Reformation"—which, they add, is now in an editor's | people can not remain longer neglected in England. hands, and will be shortly given to the public. Besides the political importance which the country

will yet assume, there is beauty and originality in LAMARTINE's new periodical, the Civilisateur, is the language itself deserving study. Of all Euroreceiving fair support. The subscriptions are coming pean tongues, it has most of the Oriental spirit and in rapidly, and the first number will appear shortly. form in its idioms. We are glad to find that an ele

mentary work, entitled “The Hungarian Language ; The Mysteries of the People, by Eugene Sue, is its Structure and Rules, with Exercises and a lo announced to be completed immediately. The sale cabulary,' is in the press, by Sigismund Wékey, late of this eccentric novel, to say no more, has been aid-de-camp to Kossuth. Both in Great Britain and prodigious. Eugene Sue is in Switzerland. , America, we have little doubt, the book will be pop

ular." Dr. Neuman, Professor of History in the University of Munich, has completed his long-promised The Edinburgh papers record the death, upon the History of the English Empire in Asia. It is on the 14th, at the early age of forty-four, of ROBERT BLACK eve of publication.

WOOD, Esq., the head of the firm of eminent publish

ers of that name. For the last two years the state Herr HARTLEBEN, the publisher at Pesth and of Mr. Blackwood's health compelled his withdrawal Vienna, whose meritorious efforts to familiarize his from a business which, for the previous fifteen years, countrymen with the best works of English literature, he had conducted with admirable energy, sagacity, has just published a translation of Mr. DICKENS's and success. In the discharge of the difficult duties Child's History of England. A German adition of which devolved upon him, from his position with Mr. WARBURTON's Darien is preparing for publication. reference to the literary men of the day, Robert

Black wood uniformly displayed the same strong The German letter addressed to the Countess Hahn. practical sense for which his father, the founder of Hann on her two works-From Babylon to Jerusa- the Magazine, was distinguished. He was respect lem, and In Jerusalem-in Germany generally as- ed and beloved for his simple and manly qualities cribed to Dr. Nitzsch, of Berlin, has been translat- by all who had the happiness to know him. His ed and published by Mr. Parker. It is very clever, judgments were independent, clear, and decided ; and will probably arnuse and interest the readers of his attachments strong and sincere, and by many his that lady's former novels. The restless longing after name will be long and warmly remeinbered as that new sensations, and the logicless action of a vain of a stanch and cordial friend. and ambitious mind, have seldom been analyzed so well or satirized so keenly as in Babylon and Je | The friends and admirers of the late Lorenz OKEN

usalem. A sharp preface from the translator also one of the most eminent anatomists and natural phi adds to the reader's zest.

losophers of modern Europe, have set on foot a sub

scription for a monument to his memory. Oken's GUTZKOW, the German critic and novelist, has writings have been widely read in Europe and in just published a collected edition of his works in America-and have, we believe, been translated into thirteen volumnes, to which he is about to add a four- French, Italian, and Scandinavian, as well as into teenth volume, containing the memoirs of his earlier English. The character of the monament can not years. His gigantic novel, the Knights of the Spirit, be determined until the probable amount of the subhas reached a second edition.

scription shall have been ascertained-but it is ex.

pected to take the form of a bust or a statue, to be An English newspaper, The Rhenish Times, is set up in the Platz at Jena. about to be published at Neuwied, on the Rhine. This new organ, which has not many chances of Baron D'Ohson died recently at Stockholm, aged success, is to be devoted to polite literature, politics, 73. He was a member of the Academy of Sciences, &c., from the contributions of a number of “ eminent and President of the Royal Society of Literature in English authors," now residents of Neuwied and its that city. He was one of the most eminent Oriental environs.

scholars of the day, and author, among other things,

of an important work on the peoples of Caucasus, and The Austrian government, in order to secure the of a valuable history of Chinese Tartary. He was improvement of Hebrew works of devoţion for its born at Constantinople, of Armenian parents, but own subjects, has authorized the establishment of a was educated at Paris. He became secretary to special printing press at Goritz, in Illyria; and it Bernadotte, accompanied him to Sweden, and subcalculates that it will henceforth be able to supply sequently fulfilled several diplomatic missions to the vast demand which exists in the East. Hereto- Paris, London, &c. fore the Jews of Eastern Europe, of Asia, and of Northern Africa, have obtained their religious books Turin journals announce the death of SERANGELI, principally from Amsterdam or Leghorn.

an artist of celebrity. He was born at Rome, in 1770,

and became a pupil of the celebrated David. At an “Of the language and literature of Hungary," says early age he distinguished himself by a pairting in the Literary Gazette, "little is known in England. one of the annual exhibitions at Paris, and commis No European nation has excited so much political sions of importance were given to him by the governinterest, with so little intellectual communion, or ment. His principal works are: Eurydice dying in literary intercourse with other nations. By deeds, the arms of Orpheus ; Orpheus soliciting her release very little by words, has Hungary gained the sym from the King of Hell ; Sophocles pleading against his pathy and respect of the Anglo-Saxon freemen on both Sons; a Christ Crucified; and the Interview of the sides of the Atlantic. Few Englishmen have ever Emperors Napoleon and Alexander at Tilsit. Of late heard of the names of Garay, and Petöfi, and Kis- years he confined himself principally to portrait-paint. faludy, and Vörösmartz, whose lyric strains stir the ing, and his skill as an historical painter declined ir bearts of the Magyars. The literature of so noble a consequence.

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Vol. IV.No. 23.-Y y*

VOICE IN THE DISTANCE.-"Now, then, Smith-Come along 1)

ITH_on, it's all very well to say, Come along! when he won't move a stepand I'm afraid he's going to lie doo

GOING TO COVER.

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OLD GENT." You see, my Dear. that the Earth turns on its own Axis, and makes one Revolution round the Sun each Year.

YOUNG REVOLVER.-" Then, Pa, does France turn on its own Axis when it
makes its Revolutions ?”

OLD GENT.—“No, my Dear, it turns on its Bayonets. However, that's not a
Question in Astronomy."

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THOUGHTS ON FRENCH AFFAIRS. (Selected from a Course of Lectures by Professor Punch.)

The President has been elected for ten years. By the time this period has closed, it will be found that not only the term of the President's power, but the prosperity of France will be Decade (Dccayed).

"Election,” according to the Dictionaries, is a synonym for “ Choice." But in Louis Napoleon's new Political Dictionary we find the significant addendum :-"Hobson's' understood."

The two parties in France, who are the one in favor of a King and the other in favor of a Commonwealth, are easily distinguished by the denominations of Monarchists and Republicans; but there is some difficulty in finding a denomination for those in favor of an Empire, unless we adopt that of Empirics.

The President is said to be a firm believer in the Thompsonian practice of medicine. This is probable, from the fact that he has treated the Insurgents with Cayenne.

In honor of the vote for Louis Napoleon “the Tower of Notre Dame was decorated with hangings.” Considering the origin of the present government, which is based on so many shootings, a very appropriate decoration is by means of hanging.

The French trees of Liberty have been cut down and the wood given to the poor for fuel. The only liberty which the French have is to warm themselves.

The French have long been well instructed in Deportment; the President is now giving them lessons in Deportation.

FRANCE is still quiet; she is taking her little

EARLY PUBLICATION OF A LIBERAL PAPER

PARIS,-Time-Four A.M.

Nap.

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This plate represents the " PRINCE PRESIDENT" taking possession of the effects of his deceased Uncle. From an old chest he has rummaged out the Imperial globe, crown, eagle, and col. lar. The Code Napoleon, a pair of military boots-too large to fit the new owner-and a bayonet, make up the remainder of the contents of the chest. The sceptre is surmounted by an expanded hand, the thumb of which comes in suspicious proximity 10 the nose of a bust of the Uncle. From an open closet the Imperial eagle, reduced to the last state of emaciation, is looking out. In the fireplace is the Imperial chair, to which an old hag, who inight pass for the Avenging Nemesis, is set. ting fire, probably with the wood of the Trees of Liberty. Sundry hoards, left by the former occupant of the house, have been discovered, from which the young heir's ghostly attendant is help. ing himself. 'The new tailor, Monsieur GENDARME, is in the act of measuring the President for a suit of “Imperial purple, first quality.” Mademoiselle LIBERTE, accompanied by her mother, Madame FRANCE, comes 10 demand the fulfillinent of the promises he has made her, and has brought the wedding-ring; but he refuses to fulfill his solemnly.sworn engagement; and of. sers money to the mother, who rejects it with an expression of countenance that brooks no good to the gay deceiver. "The characters in this picture," says Herr SAUERTEIG, "are admirably de. veloped: the stupid brutality of the heir, the grief and shame of the poor deceived LIBERTE, the anger of FRANCE, which, it is clear, will not be satisfied with words, the greed and avance of the peculating priest, and the business like

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SCENE FROM THE “ PRESIDENT'S PROGRESS.”

(Suggested by Hogarth's Rake's Progress.)

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air of the tailor-perfectly indiere

che fits his patron with an 180perial robe or a convici's blouse

by of the highest admiration."

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