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Section

Pamo

117. Influence of habit on conceptions of sight

161

118. Of the subserviency of our conceptions to description

162

119. Of conceptions attended with a momentary belief

163

120. Conceptions which are joined with perceptions.

165

121. Conceptions as connected with fictitious representations . 167

Chap. XI.--SIMPLICITY AND COMPLEXNESS OF MENTAL STATES

122. Origin of the distinction of simple and complex

168

123. Nature and characteristics of simple mental states

124. Simple mental states not susceptible of definition

. 169

125. Simple mental states representative of a reality

126. Origin of complex notions and their relation to simple

171

127. Supposed complexness without the antecedence of simple feelings 172

128. The precise sense in which complexness is to be understood

129. Illustrations of analysis as applied to the mind

174

130. Complex notions of external origin

175

131. Of objects contemplated as wholes

:6

132. Something more in external objects than mere attributes or qua..

ities

177

133 Imperfections of our complex notions of external objects : . 178

Chap. XII.--ABSTRACTION.

134. Abstractior implied in the analysis of complex ideas

. 180

135. Instances of particular abstract ideas

181

136. Mental process in separating and abstracting them

182

137. Of generalizations of particular abstract mental states

183

138. Or the importance and uses of abstraction

184

Chap. XIII. --OENERAL. ABSTRACT IDEAS.

139. General abstract notions the same with genera and species . 185

140. Process in classification, or the forming of genera and species. 185

141. Early classifications sometimes incorrect

186

142. Illustration of our earliest classifications

. 187

143. Of the nature of general abstract ideas

. 188

144. Objection sometimes made to the existence of general notions

145. The power of general abstraction in connexion with numbers, &c. 191

146. Of general abstract truths or principles

192

147. Of the speculations of philosophers and others

148. Of different opinions formerly prevailing

193

149. Of the opinions of the Realists

150. Of the opinions of the Nominalists

195

151, of the opinions of the Conceptualists

195

152. Further remarks of Brown on general abstractions

· 190

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Chap. XIV.--OF ATTENTION.

153. Of the general nature of attention

198

154. Of different degrees of attention

199

155. Dependance of memory on attention

156. Of exercising attention in reading

202

157. Alleged inability to command the attention

203

CHAP. XV --DREAMING.

158. Definition of dreams and the prevalence of them

204

159. Connexion of dreams with our waking thoughts

205

160. Dreams are often caused by our sensations.

161. Explanation of the incoherency of dreams. (Ist cause) . 207

162 Second cause of the incoherency of dreams

163. Apparent reality of dreams. (ist cause)

. 209

164. Apparent reality of dreams. (2d cause)

. 210

165 oi our estimate of time in dreaming

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208

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INTELLECTUAL STATES OF INTERNAL ORIGIN.

Chap. I.-INTERNAL ORIGIN OF KNOWLEDGE.

Bection

Pago

169. The soul has fountains of knowledge within

170. Declaration of Locke, that the soul has knowledge in itself

171. Opinions of Cudworth on the subject of internal knowledge

172. Further remarks of the same writer on this subject

224

173. Writers who have objected to the doctrine of an internal source

of knowledge

226

174. Knowledge begins in the senses, but has internal accessions

175. Instances of notions which have an internal origin

176. Imperfections attendant on classifications in mental philosophy : 231

CHAP. II.--ORIGINAL SUGGESTION,

177. Import of suggestion, and its application in Reid and Stewart 232

178. Ideas of existence, mind, self-existence, and personal identity 234

179. Origin of the idea of externality

180. Idea of matter or material existence

181. Origin of the idea of motion .

182. Of the nature of unity and the origin of that notion

239

183. Nature of succession, and origin of the idea of succession 240

184. Origin of the notion of duration

241

185. of time and its measurements, and of eternity

243

186. Marks or characteristics of time

243

187. The idea of space not of external origin

245

188. The idea of space has its origin in suggestion

189. Characteristic marks of the notion of space .

247

190. Of the origin of the idea of power

249

191. Origin of the idea of the first or primitive :

250

192. Of the ideas of right and wrong

251

193. Origin of the ideas of moral merit and demerit

252

194. or other elements of knowledge developed in suggestion

195. Suggestion a source of principles as well as of ideas

254

Chap. III.--CONSCIOUSNESS.

196. Consciousness the second source of internal knowledge; its nature 256

197. Further remarks on the proper objects of consciousness

257

198. Consciousness a ground or law of belief

258

199. Instances of knowledge developed in consciousness

259

CHAP. IV.-RELATIVE SUGGESTION OR JUDGMENT,

200. Of the susceptibility of perceiving or feeling relations

261

201. Occasions on which feelings of relation may arise

262

202. Of the use of correlative terms

263

203. Of the great number of our ideas of relation

263

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204. Of relations of identity and diversity

264

205. Of axioms in connexion with relations of identity and diversity : 265

206. (II) Relations of degree, and names expressive of them . 265

207. Relations of degree in adjectives of the positive form .

. 266

208. (III.) Of relations of proportion

268

209. (IV.) of relations of place or position

210. (V.) Of relations of time

211. (VI.) Of relations of possession

. 271

212. (VII.) Of relations of cause and effect

213. Of complex terms involving the relation of cause and effect

214. Remarks on instituted or conventional relations .

273

215 Connexion of relative suggestion or judgment with reasoning : 274

Chap. V.-ASSOCIATION (PRIMARY LAWs).

216. Reasons for considering this subject here

217. Meaning of association and illustrations

. 276

218. Of the general laws of association

. 277

219. Resemblance the first general law of association

278

220. Resemblance in every particular not necessary

. 279

221. Of resemblance in the effects produced

. 280

222. Contrast the second general or primary law

. 281

223. Contiguity the third general or primary law

224. Cause and effect the fourth primary law

Chap. VI.-ASSOCIATION (SECONDARY LAWS).

225. Secondary laws and their connexion with the primary

285

226. Of the influence of lapse of time

227. Secondary law of repetition or habit

287

228. Of the secondary law of coexistent emotion

288

229. Original difference in the mental constitution

230. The foregoing law as applicable to the sensibilities

290

231. Of association caused by present objects of perception

292

232. Causes of increased vividness in these instances

294

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CHAP. IX.--DURATION OF MEMORY.

262. Restoration of thoughts and feelings supposed to be forgotten 331

263. Mental action quickened by influence on the physical system 333

264. Other instances of quickened mental action, and of a restoration

of thoughts.

334

265. Effect on the memory of a severe attack of fever

334

266. Approval and illustrations of these views from Coleridge

335

267. Application of the principles of this chapter to education

337

268. Connexion of this doctrine with the final judgment and a future

life

339

Chap. X.-REASONING.

269. Reasoning a source of ideas and knowledge

340

270. Illustrations of the value of the reasoning power

341

271. Definition of reasoning, and of propositions .

342

272. Process of the mind in all cases of reasoning

344

273. Grounds of the selection of propositions

345

274. Reasoning implies the existence of antecedent or assumed propo.

sitions

347

275. Of reasoning å priori

348

276. Of reasoning à posteriori

277. Of reasoning à fortiori

351

278. Of differences in the power of reasoning

351

279. Of habits of reasoning

353

280. Of reasoning in connexion with language or expression 354

CHAP. XI.--DEMONSTRATIVE REASONING.

281. Of the subjects of demonstrative reasoning :

356

282. Use of definitions and axioms in demonstrative reasoning 357

283. The opposites of demonstrative reasonings absurd

358

284. Demonstrations do not admit of different degrees of belief 359

285. Of the use of diagrams in demonstrations

360

296. Of signs in general as connected with reasoning

361

287. Of the influence of demonstrative reasoning on the mental char-

362

288. Further considerations on the influence of demonstrative reasoning 363

CHAP. XII.-MORAL REASONING.

289. Of the subjects and importance of moral reasoning

365

290. Of the nature of moral certainty

366

291. Of reasoning from analogy

367

202. Caution to be used in reasoning from analogy

368

293 Of reasoning by induction

369

294. Of the caution necessary in inductive processes

370

295. Of instances or experiments in inductive reasoning termed instan-

tiæ crucis

371

296. Of combined or accumulated arguments

372

Chap. XIII.-PRACTICAL DIRECTIONS IN REASONING.

297. Rules relating to the practice of reasoning

373

298. Of being influenced in reasoning by a love of the truth

373

Vau. I.-B

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