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The senate committee on the judiciary of the Territory Legislature reported as follows on a similar resolution (S. J. Res. No. 4):

There is no provision in the organic act which provides for the appointment of an acting secretary of the Territory to serve as such during the temporary absence of the secretary from the Territory or during his illness. This resolution requests the Congress of the United States to amend the organic act so as to provide for the appointment of such acting secretary.

The need for this amendment is only too obvious inasmuch as there are certain official acts and duties pertaining to this office which must have the personal attention of the secretary in order to be valid.

No cost to the Federal Government is involved, and in compliance with the rule, there follows a statement of the law showing the new language in italics:

SEC. 69. That there shall be a secretary of the said Territory, who shall be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate of the United States, and who shall be a citizen of the Territory of Hawaii and hold his office for four years and until his successor shall be appointed and qualified, unless sooner removed by the President. He shall record and preserve all the laws and proceedings of the legislature and all acts and proceedings of the governor, and promulgate proclamations of the governor. He shall, within thirty days after the end of each session of the legislature, transmit to the President, the President of the Senate, and the Speaker of the House of Representatives of the United States one copy each of the laws and journals of such session. He shall transmit to the President, semiannually, on the first days of January and July, a copy of the executive proceedings, and shall perform such other duties as are prescribed in this act or as may be required of him by the Legislature of Hawaii.

The secretary may, with the approval of the governor, designate some other officer of the government of the Territory of Hawaii to act as secretary during his temporary absence or during his illness. Such designation and approval shall be in writing and shall be filed in the office of the governor, and a copy thereof, certified by the governor, shall be filed in the office of the Secretary of the Interior of the United States. Such person so designated shall, during the temporary absence or illness of the secretary, be known as the acting secretary of the Territory of Hawaii, and shall have and exercise all the powers and duties of the secretary, except those provided for by section 70 of this act (U. S. C., title 48, sec. 535). Such acting secretary shall serve without additional compensation, but the secretary shall be responsible and liable on his official bond for all acts done by the acting secretary in the erformance of his duties as acting secretary.

O

INCORPORATION OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA COM

MISSION, GEORGE WASHINGTON BICENTENNIAL

JANUARY 8, 1932.—Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed

Mrs. NORTON, of New Jersey, from the Committee on the District

of Columbia, submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 1306)

The Committee on the District of Columbia, to whom was referred the bill (S. 1306) to provide for the incorporation of the District of Columbia Commission, George Washington Bicentennial, having considered the same, reports favorably thereon and recommends that the bill do pass.

This measure passed the Senate on December 21, 1931, and an identical House bill (H. R. 5341) has been favorably reported by this committee.

A copy of the report submitted by the Senate Committee on the District of Columbia is hereto appended and made a part hereof.

OBJECT OF THE BILL

This bill proposes to incorporate the District of Columbia Commission on the George Washington Bicentennial for the duration of the bicentennial celebration in 1932.

The commission was created by the District Commissioners in 1930. Congress previously had established the United States Commission on the Bicentennial and had authorized the creation of State commissions to bring about an intensive, nation-wide observance of the two hundredth anniversary of the birth of George Washington.

The Seventy-first Congress authorized an appropriation of $100,000 from funds credited to the District or Columbia for the use of this District of Columbia Commission.

It is now evident that this amount will be insufficient to cover the expenses necessary to the fitting celebration of the Bicentennial in the Nation's Capital.

NEED FOR THE BILL

The bill will permit the commission, as a corporation, to engage in the necessary construction of stands, platforms, etc., for the numerous proposed bicentennial pageants and entertainments. It will give the commission authority to grant such concessions as may be desirable.

Every possible safeguard has been thrown about the commission's activities in regard to stands and seats. Any such erected on public space must be approved by the commissioners or the Director of Public Buildings and Public Parks, depending upon which agency has jurisdiction over the land so used. The District laws requiring inspection of stands and platforms for safety of construction would govern any such structures on private property.

The principal concessions which the commission has in mind at this time are for the sale of seats and the publications and sale of official programs. Money derived from these sources will be of great assistance to the commission in carry ing out the program it contemplates.

In all phases of the commission's activity covered by the bill, the commission will be subject to the supervision of the commissioners or the Director of Public Buildings and Public Parks, as the case may be.

RECOMMENDATIONS

The committee discussed this bill with the corporation counsel of the District of Columbia and with Dr. George C. Havenner, executive vice chairman of the District Bicentennial Commission. The District Commissioners, who requested introduction of the bill, urge its enactment in a letter appended hereto, together with an earlier communicaton from these officials and a letter by Doctor Haven

ner.

COMMISSIONERS OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA,

Washington, December 17, 1931. Hon. ARTHUR CAPPER, Chairman Committee on the District of Columbia,

United States Senate, Washington, D. C. Sir: The Commissioners of the District of Columbia have the honor to recommend favorable action on Senate bill 1306, Seventy-second Congress, first session, entitled "A bill to provide for the incorporation of the District of Columbia Commission, George Washington Bicentennial,” which you referred to them for consideration and report.

This bill was introduced by you at the request of the commissioners, and the necessity for its passage is indicated in the letter of December 8, in which the draft of the bill was forwarded to you. Very truly yours,

L. H. REICHELDERFER, President Board of Commissioners of the District of Columbia.

COMMISSIONERS OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA,

Washington, December 8, 1931. Hon. ARTHUR CAPPER, Chairman Committee on the District of Columbia,

United States Senate, Washington, D. C. SIR: The Commissioners of the District of Columbia have the honor to inclose herewith draft of a bill entitled “A bill to provide for the incorporation of the District of Columbia Commission, George Washington Bicentennial,” and to request its introduction and enactment.

There is inclosed herewith copy of a letter from the vice president of the District of Columbia George Washington Bicentennial Commission, which explains the necessity for this legislation. Very truly yours,

L. H. REICHELDERFER, President, Board of Commissioners of the District of Columbia.

District of ColumbIA,
GEORGE WASHINGTON BICENTENNIAL COMMISSION,

December 4, 1931. The COMMISSIONERS OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA,

Washington, D. C. GENTLEMEN: I have the honor to transmit herewith a draft of bill to incorporate the District of Columbia George Washington Bicentennial Commission for the term of the bicentennial period with the request that if the same meets with your approval it be transmitted to the Senate and House of Representatives.

The purpose of this bill is to authorize the District Bicentennial Commission to construct or contract for the construction of stands and the sale of seats for certain of the pageants and parades that will be sponsored by our commission, also to give the commission the authority to grant concessions such as may be desirable in connection with the bicentennial celebration. The bill provides that any structure, platform, or stand to be erected upon public space shall first be approved by the Commissioners of the District of Columbia or by the Director of Public Buildings and Public Parks where the same are intended to be erected on public space coming under the jurisdiction of that office. The principal concessions that the commission has in mind at this time are for the sale of seats and the publication and sale of the official program.

I might add in this connection that the program to be issued by our commission will include not only the activities coming under the immediate jurisdiction of our commission, but all of the activities that will come under the jurisdiction of the United States commission and will bear the approval of that commission.

Our commission deems this legislation to be urgently needed, as the fund appropriated by the Congress from the revenues of the District of Columbia will not be nearly enough to cover the expenses of our commission's program. Yours very truly,

Geo. C. HAVENNER,

Executive Vice Chairman.

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