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EXPENSES OF AMERICAN DELEGATES TO GENERAL

DISARMAMENT CONFERENCE

JANUARY 8, 1932.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the

state of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. LINTHICUM, from the Committee on Foreign Affairs, submitted

the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. J. Res. 163)

The Committee on Foreign Affairs, to which was referred House Joint Resolution 163, to provide an appropriation for expenses of participation by the United States in a general disarmament conference to be held in Geneva in 1932, having had the same under consideration, reports thereon with the recommendation that the resolution do pass with the following amendments:

Page 1, line 3, after the word “that" insert "the sum of $450,000 or" and after the word “much" insert the word “thereof."

The passage of this resolution is recommended by the President in his message to Congress of December 21, 1931, as follows: To the Congress of the United States:

In my message on foreign affairs which was communicated to the Congress on the ioth day of this month, I spoke of the invitation which this Government has accepted to participate in the general disarmament conference which is to meet at Geneva on February 2, 1932. I spoke also in that message of the interest of this Government in supporting the efforts of this conference in accordance with the traditional policy of the American Nation to meet with the other nations of the world and to offer its cooperation in any endeavor which has in view the reduction of the huge burdens which result from unnecessarily heavy and costly armaments.

I am transmitting herewith and I commend to the favorable consideration of the Congress a report on the subject from the Secretary of State in which he requests that authorization be made for an appropriation to defray the expenses of sending an American delegation to Geneva for the purpose of representing the United States at the conference.

HERBERT HOOVER. THE WHITE HOUSE, December 21, 1931.

The PRESIDENT:

In the message to Congress of January 4, 1926, recommending the appropriation of funds for participation in the work of the preparatory commission for the disarmament conference set up by the Council of the League of Nations, President Coolidge pointed out that the purpose of this commission was “to make preparations for a conference for disarmament which it is the announced purpose of the council to call at an early date."

After six sessions, held during the period from April, 1926, to December, 1930, and in which the United States was represented regularly through an official delegation, the commission completed its task of laying the ground work for a general conference. On June 13, 1931, the secretary general of the League of Nations consequently issued invitations to all nations, whether members of the league or not, to participate in a general disarmament conference to be convened at Geneva on February 2, 1932. This invitation was received by the Department of State on July 7, and four days later the American minister at Berne was directed to transmit to the secretary general the following reply:

“The Acting Secretary of State of the United States of America has received the note of the secretary general of the League of Nations dated June 13, 1931, in which, pursuant to a resolution of the council adopted on May 22, he extended an invitation to the American Government to participate in the general disarmament conference to be convened at Geneva on February 2, 1932.

“The American Government is happy to accept this invitation and welcomes the opportunity for cooperating with the other nations in a common effort to reduce the menace and to lighten the burden of armaments under which the world is suffering.”

The need for some measure of limitation and reduction of armaments has become more urgent at this time than ever before. The threat of a new race in armaments hangs like a dark cloud over Europe, disturbing political tranquillity and preventing that consolidation of peaceful and harmonious relations between nations, without which a return to prosperity is impossible. The tremendous dead weight of mounting armament costs constitutes a drain on the national resources of all nations which not only has helped to bring about and to aggravate the present economic world crisis but is also actively impeding recovery.

Armaments in one country are to a large extent determined by armaments in neighboring countries. It is therefore futile to hope for a reduction or even a stabilization of armaments without an international agreement arrived at through a conference of all powers. The success of the Washington and London naval conferences in bringing about a full and all-inclusive limitation of the navies of the United States, the British Empire, and Japan, and in completely ending naval competition between these powers, has demonstrated the value of this method.

But these conferences were only a beginning. Land and air armaments generally remain unrestricted; there are, moreover, a number of countries with navies which, while as yet relatively small, are unlimited. The coming conference will take another step forward toward the goal of the complete and lasting abolition of all arms competition. Further steps may be necessary, for disarmament, it must always be remembered, is a continuing process and one advance heralds another. The success of the coming conference-even in a limited field-can not fail to inspire new confidence and release new forces of progress.

While the present strength of our Army does not constitute a menace to any other nation, I am certain the Congress will agree that active American collaboration in the first general disarmament conference is a vital necessity if it is not to fail. This country's unrelenting stand in favor of effective measures of limitation and reduction will act as a stimulus toward success. The United States has never failed to offer its cooperation in efforts looking toward the greater welfare of mankind. Its association with the other nations of the world in this conference will be in line with the traditional policy of the United States.

It is expected that the duration of the forthcoming conference will be approximately seven or eight months and that the cost of an appropriate delegation will be a little more than $55,000 a month. It is my judgment that the initial appropriation should be $450,000. It is possible, however, that developments may occur which will prolong the conference beyond the period indicated. Therefore, it would be desirable for Congress to authorize the appropriation of such amounts as it may find to be necessary, rather than a specified sum, in order that, if the conference should be prolonged, such additional appropriations as Congress may deem essential may be obtained without the delay incident to the enactment of new authorizing legislation.

As a matter of convenience, a draft of a resolution to carry out this recommendation is hereto attached. Respectfully submitted.

HENRY L. STIMSON. DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, December 21, 1931.

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AMEND THE HAWAIIAN ORGANIC ACT

JANUARY 8, 1932.—Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed

Mr. Dowell, from the Committee on the Territories, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 308)

The Committee on the Territories, to whom was referred the bill H. R. 308, after consideration, reports the same favorably and recommends that the bill do pass.

This is a bill to amend section 69 of the Hawaiian organic act by adding at the end of the section a new paragraph, which in substance allows the secretary of Hawaii to designate some other officer of the government of the Territory of Hawaii to act as secretary during his temporary absence or during his illness.

Section 69 reads as follows:

Sec. 69. That there shall be a secretary of the said Territory, who shall be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate of the United States, and who shall be a citizen of the Territory of Hawaii and hold his office for four years and until his successor shall be appointed and qualified, unless sooner removed by the President. He shall record and preserve all the laws and proceedings of the legislature and all acts and proceedings of the governor, and promulgate proclamations of the governor. He shall, within thirty days after the end of each session of the legislature, transmit to the President, the President of the Senate, and the Speaker of the House of Representatives of the United States one copy each of the laws and journals of such session. He shall transmit to the President, semiannually, on the first days of January and July, a copy of the executive proceedings, and shall perform such other duties as are prescribed in this act or as may be required of him by the legislature of Hawaii.

This bill was introduced in compliance with the request contained in the joint resolution No. 4 of the legislature of the Territory, session

HR-72-1-VOL 1-7

of 1931, which together with a letter of transmittal and a certificate of the secretary of the Territory of Hawaii is quoted herewith:

TERRITORY OF HAWAII,
DEPARTMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF HAWAII,

Honolulu, June 17, 1931. Hon. V. S. K. Houston,

Delegate to Congress from Hawaii. DEAR Sir: I am handing you herewith certified copy of joint resolution No. 4 of the Legislature of the Territory of Hawaii, session of 1931, memorializing the Congress of the United States to amend section 534 of title 48 of the United States Code (sec. 69 of the Hawaiian organic act) relating to the appointment, powers, and duties of the secretary of the Territory of Hawaii, so as to provide for the appointment of an acting secretary of the Territory of Hawaii during the absence or illness of the secretary. Very truly yours,

RAYMOND C. BROWN,

Secretary of Hawaii.

TERRITORY OF HAWAII,

Office of the Secretary. This is to certify that hereto attached is a true and correct copy of joint resolution No. 4 of the Session Laws of Hawaii, 1931 of the Legislature of the Territory of Hawaii, the original of which is on file in this office.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the great seal of the Territory to be affixed.

Done at the capitol, in Honolulu, thïs 22d day of May, A. D. 1931. (SEAL.)

RAYMOND C. BROWN, Secretary of the Territory of Hawaii.

Joint Resolution (J. R, No. 4, H. J. R. No. 14) memorializing the Congress of the United States of America to amend section 534 of title 48 of the United States Code (section 69 of the Hawaiian organic act) relating to the appointment, powers and duties of the Secretary of the Territory of Hawaii, so as to provide for the appointment of an acting secretary of the Territory of Hawaii during the absence or illness of the Secretary

Be it enacted by the Legislature of the Territory of Hawaii, That the Congress of the United States of America be, and it hereby is, requested to amend section 534 of title 48 of the United States Code (section 69 of the Hawaiian organic act), relating to the appointment, powers, and duties of the Secretary of the Territory of Hawaii, by adding, after the end of said section, the following provision:

“He may, with the approval of the governor, designate some other officer of the government of the Territory of Hawaii to act during his temporary absence from the Territory or during his illness. Such designation and approval shall be in writing and shall be filed in the office of the governor, and a copy thereof, certified by the governor, shall be filed with the Secretary of the Interior at Washington. Such person, so designated, shall, during the temporary absence or illness of the secretary, be known as the acting secretary of the Territory of Hawaii, and shall have and exercise all the powers and duties of the secretary, except those provided for by section 535 of title 48 of the United States Code, but shall not be entitled to any additional compensation while so acting: Provided, however, That the secretary shall be responsible and liable on his official bond for all acts done or performed by the person designated to act in his absence or illness as herein prescribed.” Approved this 18th day of March, A. D. 1931.

LAWRENCE M. JUDD,

Governor of the Territory of Hawaii. The committee on the judiciary of the Territorial house of representatives, in part, reported as follows on this joint resolution (H. J. Res. No. 14):

That under the existing law no power exists to appoint some one to act in the place and stead of the secretary of the Territory while such secretary is temporarily absent from the seat of the Territorial government or during his illness. Such defect in the law occasions much trouble and inconvenience, and as Joint Resolution No. 14 remedies such defect, your committee recommends its passage.

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