Pagina-afbeeldingen
PDF
ePub
[ocr errors]

155.

MEMOIRS of Paul Jones,

393 PLAYS, old. See Six.

. See Moral.

PLYMOUTH in an Uproar, 393

MODJSH Wire,

235 POETIC Tales,

MONBONDO's Ancient Metaphysics, 191 - - Epifle to the Aushor of a Pa.

MOORE's Seaman's Daily Afiftant, . 192 raphrase, &c.

234

Moral and Historical Memoirs, 46 POLITICAL Mirror,

227

MURDIN'S Three Sermons, 395 Poor Crocus,

393

POVOLERI'' Rules for reading Italian,

PRIESTLEY, Dr. Publications rela-

A TANNONI on the Hydrocele, 316 tive to his Notions concerning Neces.

19 NAVIGATION, Inland. Sce

PLAN,

- Experiments, &c. in natu.

NEWTON's Works, new Edition, 28 ral Philosophy, concluded, 163
NEWCOME's Harmony of the Gospels,

Sermon on the Divine In.

258 Aluence on the Human Mind, 397

NIGHT-THOUGHTS, Author of, a fixth PROLOGUES and Epilogues, Collection

Volume of his Works,

65 of,

NORMAN Di&ionary,

78 Proposals for the Uniformity of

Nosis. See TREAT ISE.

Weights and Measures in Scotland, 21

Psalm. See COMMENT.

PUBLICAN's Guide,

PYGMALION, a Poem,

75

BSERVATIONS on the Plan for a

V Dispensary, &c.

on the National Debt,

D EAY, Miss, ber Care, 65

- on “ A Short History R Reflections on the Doctrine

of the Opposition,"

227 of Materialism,

35

- on the Tragedy of al. Remarks on the Rescript of the Court

of Madrid,

Ode to the Privateer Commanders, zo

on Robinson's Plan, 295

to the Genius of Great Britain, REMONTRANCE des Naturalifles, 238

235 REPLY to Burgoyne's Letter,

- See ENGLAND's Defiance. REPORTS of the Humane Society, for

Opus by Alves,

1778,

391

OSSORY, Bishop of, his Harmony of the

of Cares. See Brown.
Gospels,

REYNOLDS's Discourse to the Royal

OUTLAWRY, Law of,

Academy,

17

ROBINSON, Lewis, his Evers Patient his
P.
own Doctor,

- 64

, Robert, his Translation of

DARAPHRASE on Anlley's Paraphrase, Claude's Elay on the Composition of a

76

Sermon,

100

PARNASSIAN Sprigs,

- his Plan of Ledures on

PEARCE's Sermons,

119 Nonconformity,

195

PETRSFACTIONS. Sep WALCOTT. ROCHESTER, Bishop of, his Sermons,
PHILALETHES Runicans, on Material.
35 Rousseau's Pygmalion,

75
PHILIPS's History of Shrew houry, 315 ROWLEY's Seventy-four Cases, 317
PHILOSOPHICAL Transactions, Volume RUFFORD'S Sermon for the Support of
IXVIU, Part 2,
401 Missionaries,

310
PILSL OXENIAN Verfion of the Gospels, ROSTINI On the Teeth,
White's Publication of,

36

PICTURES of Men, Manners, &c. 156

s,

PIGEON Fancier,
PLAIN Sate of Facts, relative to the ссотен Hit,
Trial of Sir Al. Leien,

397 SCOTLAND. See PROPOSAL.
PLAN for recruiting the Army, 308 SEAMAN's Daily Alfidant,

152
of the navigable Canals in Eng. SERMONS, fingle, 79, 160, 238, 320,
land,
387

396, 479
of Lectures. See ROBINSON.

by Bishop Pearce,

PLAYHOUSE Pocket Companion, 157

by Brovshion,

319

SERMONS

bina,

225

76

jim,

396

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

SERMONS by Hodgson,

THOMsoN's Seasong. See AIKIN

by Murdin,

THOUGHTS on the Times,

156

SHEPNERD's Dying Hero,

y on the Conduct of Admiral

SHINSTONE-GREEN,

Keppel,

235

SHORT Hiftory of the Opposition, TITHE. See BATEMAN,

- Defence of the Oppoqtion, 228 TOBACCO. See CARVER.

- Appeal to the Public, 236 TOLLER's Sermon for propagating Chris-

- Higory of Administration, 456 tian Knowledge,

SHORTER Answer to the Short History Townson's Vifitation Sermon, 396

of the Opposition,

30 TRANSPLANTATION,

SHREWSBURY, Hiftory of,

393

* Hiftory of.

315 TREATISE on counting Nores,

235

SIXTELN Sonnets,

75 TRELAWNEY's Sermon at Taunton,

Sıx old Plays, on which Shakespeare

320

founded his King Lear, &c, 296 Turner's View of the Earth, 157

SKETCH of a Farce,

67

SKETCHES from Nature,

ŚMITH, Capt. his Military Di&ionary,

Iew of the Evidence relative to the

-, Rev. Mr, his Charge to the

American War,

79:

Free Masons,

395 - of the Earth,

117

Free Malen Sermon, 398

of the present State of Ireland

SONNITS. See BAMPFYLDE,

474

SOPHIA 10 Alonzo,

SORE-THROAT, putrid, Treatise on,

SORROWS of Werter,

74

Nivias al System,

SPEARMAN'S Supplement to Hutchin-

son's Works,

238

SPEECH intended to have been spoken at

w.

the General Court of the East India

Company,

W A LCOTT's Description of Petri.

- intended to have been spoken at

W factions found near Bath, 73

Coachmakers Hall,

WATTS's Pofthumous Works, 425

STATI of Facts,

148 WESKET T's Preliminary Discourse of

STEVENSON'S Method of treating the Jasurance,

Gout,

206 WHEELDON'S Jewith Bard,

STRICTURES on the French King's WHITE's Svriac Philoxenian Verhon ot

Manifefto, &c.

226 the Gospel,

STURGES's Confiderations on the Church - - Specimen of the Inftitutes of

Establishment,

323

Tamerlane,

451

SUBSTANCE of Debates, on the King's WHITEHEAD'S Materialism considered,

Speech,

410

32

SUPPLEMENT to Swift Works, Vol. II. WILLIS's Sacrifice,

- 356

WILMER'S Cases in Surgery, 390

SURGERY, Cases in. See WILMER. Wilson's Experiments on electrical

Swist. See SPPPLEMENT,

Conductors,

154

SWINBURNI's Travels,

WOMEN. See ALEXANDER.

SYNOPSIS Medica,

-

See CRUTWELL.

World as it goes,

icg

[ocr errors]

CONTENTS of the FOREIGN ARTICLES

in the APPENDIX to this Volume.

558

559

ANQUETIL DU PERRON on Oriental ORAZI, Profeffor, his Treatise on the
Legillation,
553 Duty of a Philosopher,

559
BILIOTHEQUE Orientale, &c. 548 Pallas, M. his Observations on the
BROTIER'S Pliny,

555 Changes and Revolutions of the Globe,
BUFFON's Natural Hiðury, Supplement,

: 550

Vol. V.

531 PASCAL's Works, new and complete

CASARIS de Horatiis, &c. See ORA. edition,

: 505

21.

PLINY's Natural History, with Emen-

CHOISE U L's Travels through Greece, dations and Notes, by M. Brotier,

555

Coptic Language. See Tukr. RELIGION, Treatise on, by a Man of

D'ALEMBERT's Eulogies, read at the the World,

ib.

Fiench Academy,

RUDIMENTA Lingua Coprica five

Dr Girteriana De Vitalitate Miferis Ægsprioca,

560

minum re'učiante,

SAURI, M. nis Treatise on the Means

De la Religion, par un Homme du Monde, of rendering one Sex more numerous

555

than the other, .

DPARA's Course of Metaphyfics, 484 SCIENZA della Natura,
Duty of a Philosopher,

SENNEBIER's descriptive Catalogue of
EDUCATION of the Female Sex,

Sex, 554

the MSS, in the Library of Geneva;

ELOGES. See D'ALEMBERT.

EzOur Vejam,

THEORIE des Etres Insepsibles, 484

GENEVA, Library of. See SENNEBIER. TIRABOSCHI's Hiftory of Italian Lite
GUASCO, M. De, his Musei Capitolini, rature,
Tom. Ill.

557 TORRE, J. M. Della, his Science of Na-

HISTORY of the Royal Academy of ture, &c. Part III.

Sciences at Paris,

aris, for 1773, 489 Tuki, Raphael, his Rudiments of the

of lialian Literature, 522 Coptic Language,

- --, Natural. See BUFFON. VEDAM, See EZOUR.

LEGISLATION Orientale,

553 VISDELOU and GALAND, their Oriental

MEMOIRS of the Royal Academy of Library,

Sciences at Ber'in, for 1776, 508 VOYAGE Pittoresque de la Grece, Ch. IV.

of M. de Voltaire,

514

- of the Royal Academy of In VOLTAIR'I, Memoirs of his Life and

feriptions and Belles Lettres at Paris, Death,

514

ZECHINT, M. his Treatise on the viral
MUSEI Capitolini, Tom. IIT, 557 Principle which struggles with the
OBSE VA IJUNS lur la Formation des Evils of Humanity,

557

Aiontagnes, &c.

550

500

Τ Η Ε ::

AE

MONTHLY REVIEW,

For J U L Y, . 1779.

[ocr errors]

A&t. I. The Works of the Englis Poets, with Prefaces Biographical

and Critical. By Samuel Johnson. "The Heads engraved by Bar. tolozzi, &c. Small vo. 60 Vols. 71. 10 s. half bound. :

Bathurst, &c. 1779.
THE long-expected beautiful edition of the English poets

bas at length made its appearance, Promises that are delayed too frequently, end in disappointment; but to this remark the present publication is an exception. We must ingenuously confess, that, from the first of its being advertised, we considered Dr. Johnson's name merely as a lure which the proprietors of the work had obtained, to draw in the unwary in purchaser ; taking.it for granted that he would have just allotted, as he owns he originally intended, to every poet, an advertisement, like those which are found in the French miscel. Janies, containing a few dates, and a general character; an una dertaking, as he observes, not very tedious or difficult; and, we may add, an undertaking also that would have conferred not much reputation upon the Writer, nor have communicated much information to his readers. Happily for both, the honeft defire of giving useful pleasure, to borrow his own expression, has led him beyond his first intention. This honest desire is very amply gratified. In the walk of biography and criticism, Dr. Johnson has long been without a rival. It is barely justice to acknowledge that he still maintains his superiority. The present work is no way inferior to the best of his very celebrated productions of the same class.

Of the four volumes of his Prefaces already published (more lives being promised), the first is allotted to Cowley and Waller, the second to Milton and Butler, the third is appropriated entirely to Dryden, and the fourth is divided between poets of inferior name, Denham, Sprat, Roscommon, Rochester, Yalden, OtVOL, LXI,

way,

way, Duke, Dorset, Hätiesx, Stepney, Walth, Garth, King, J. Philips, Smith, Poin fret, and Hughes.

In the narrative.of Cowley's life there is little, except the manner in which it is told, that is new; but this deficiency, which was not in the Biographer's power to remedy, is fully compensated for in the review of his writings, which abounds in original colteism. Cowley's poetical character is introduced with an account of a race of writers who appeared about the beginning.pl.che seventeenth century, whom Dr. Johnson terms the Metaphysical Poets.

The metaphysical poets, says he, were men of learning, and to thew.theit learning was their whole endeavour; but, unluckily resolving to thew it in rhyme, instead of writing poetry, they only Aturote verses, and very often such verses as stood the trial of the fingår better than of the ear; for the modulation was so imperfect, that shey were only found to be verses by counting the syllables. . . If the father of criticism has rightly denominated poetry rhyun peripheralo xer, an imitative art, there writers will, without great wrong, lose their right to the name of poets ; for they cannot be said to have imitated any thing: they neither copied nature nor life ; neither painted the forms of matter, nor represented the operations of in. tellect.

· Those however who deny them to be poets, allow them to be wits. Dryden confeffes of himself and his contemporaries, that they fall below Donne in wit, but maintains that they surpass him in poetry.

• If Wit be well described by Pope, as being " that which has been often thought, but was never before so well expressed,” they certainly never attained, nor ever lought it; for they endeavoured to be ângular in their thoughts, and were careless of their diction. But Pope's account of wit is undoubtedly erroneous : he depresies it below its natural dignity, and reduces it from itrength of thought to happiness of language,

• If by a more noble and more adequate conception that be confidered as Wit, which is at once natural and new, that which, though not obvious, is, upon its first production, acknowledged to be juit ; if it be that, which he that never found it, wonders how he mifred; to wit of this kind the metaphysical poets have seldom rifen, Their thoughts are often new, but feldom natural; they are not obvious, but neither are they just; and the reader, far from woodering that he miff:d them, wonders more frequently by what perverfeness of industry they were ever foond.

• But Wit, abtracted froin its effects upon the bearer, may be more rigorously and philosophicaily condidered as a kind of discordia concers : a combination of disimilar images, or discovery of occult resemblances ia thiogs apparently unlike. Or wit, thus detined, they have more than enough. The most heterogeascus ideas are yoked by violence together; pasure and art are ransacked for il. luftrations, comparisoas, and allusions; their learning instructs, and their subtilty surprites; but the reader commonly thinks his improve

nco

« VorigeDoorgaan »