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ORIGINAL POZMS.

VI. To the Dutchess of York, on ber Re-

l'pon the Death of Lord Hastings........ 497

turo from Scotland in the Year 1682, 591

Heroic Stanzas on the Death of Oliver Crom-

VII. A Letter to Sir George Etheredge 592

well, written after his Funeral

498 VIII To Mr. Southerne, on his Comedy

Astrza Redux: a Poem on the bappy Resto-

called The Wives' Excuse

ration and Return of his sacred Majesty

IX, To Henry Higden, Esq. on his Trans-

Charles II. 1660 .....

499

lation of the tenih Satire of Juve-

To his sacred Majesty: a Panegyric on his

nal

ib.

Coronation

502 X. To my dear Friend, Mr. Congreve, on

To the Lord Chancellor Hyde. Presented on

his Comedy, called The Double

New Year's Day, 1662

503

Dealer......

593

Satire on the Dutch. Written in the Year

XI. To Mr. Granville, on his excellent Tra-

1662...........

........ 504

gedy, called Heroic Love

ib.

To her royal Highness the Dutebess of York, XII. To my Friend, Mr. Motteux, on his

on the memorable Victory gained by the

Tragedy, called Beauty in Distress 594

Duke over the Hollanders, June the 3d, XIII. To my honoured Kinsman, John Dry-

1665, and on her Journey afterwards into

den, of Chesterton, in the County of

the Nortb.......

ib.

Huntingdon, Esq.

ib.

Dedication to Annus Mirabilis

505 XIV. To Sir Godfrey Kneller, principal

An Account of the Poem, in a Letter to the

Painter to his Majesty

596

Hon. Sir Robert Howard

ib.

Andes Mirabilis: the Year of Wonders, 1666.

ELEGIES AND EPITAPUS.

An bistorical Poem...

508

An Essay opon Satire. By Mr. Drydenlund

1. To the Memory of Mr. Oldham 597

the Parl of Mulgrave..

Il. An Ode, to the pions Memory of

519

Absalom and Achitophel. Part I.

the accomplished young Lady Mrs.

521

Part II.

529

Anne Killegrew, excellent in the

Key to Absalom and Achitophel

538

two Sister-Arts of Poesy and Paint-

ing

ib.

The Medal. A Satire against Sedition......... 540

Tarqain and Tullia.......

542

III. Upon the Death of the Earl of Dundee.

Translated from the Latin of Dr.

Saum Caique ....

543

Pitcairn ....

599

Preface to Religio Laici : or, a Layman's

Faith.....

IV. Eleanora : a panegyrical Poem, dedi-

544

Religio Laici : an Epistle

cated to the Memory of the late

548

Countess of Abingdon

ib.

The It of Poetry. In Four Cantos :

V. On the Death of Amyntas. A pasto-

Canto I.

551

ral Elegy

603

II.

553

VI. On the Death of a very young Gen-

JII.

55+

tleman

€04

IV.

558

VII. Upon young Mr. Rogers of Glouces-

Threondia Augustalis: a funeral Pindaric

tershire

605

Poera sacred to the happy Memory of King

VIII. On the Death of Mr. Purcell. Set to

Charles II. .....

559

Music by Dr. Blow

ib.

Veni Creator Spiritus, paraphrased

565

IX. Epitaph on the Lady Whitmore

The Soliloquy of a royal Exile

564 X. Epitaph on Sir Palmes Fairbone's

The Hind and the Panther: a Poem, in Three

Tomb in Westminster Abbey ib.

Parts:

XI, Under Mr. Milton's Picture, before his

Preface.....

564

Paradise Lost

ib.

Part I.

565

XII. On the Memory of a fair maiden

II.

Lady, who died at Bath, and was

III.

574

there interred

606

Britannia Redivira: A Poem on the Prince,

XIII. Epitaph on Mrs. Margaret Paston, of

born on the tenth of June, 1688

584

Burningham, in Norfolk

ib.

Mac-Flecknoe

587

XIV. On the Monument of the Marquis of

Winchester.....

ib.

XV. Epitaph upon the Earl of Rochester's

EPISTLES.

being dismissed from the Treasury,

I. To my honoured Friend Sir Robert

in 1687

ib.

Howard, on his excellent Poems 588

XVI. Epitaph intended for Dryden's Wife.. ib.

II. To my honoured Friend Dr. Charleton,

XVII, Epigram on the Dutchess of Ports-

on his learned and useful Works,

mouth's Picture.....

ib.

but more particularly bis Treatise

XVIII. Description of old Jacob Topson ib.

of Stonehenge, by hini restored to

the true Founder

589

SONGS, ODES, AND A MASQUE.

III. To the Lady Castlemain, upon her

1. The Fair Stranger.

607

encouraging his first Play.

590 II. On the young Statesmen

ib.

IV. To Mr. Lee, on his Alexander

ib. 111. A Song for St. Cecilia's Day..... ib.

V. To the Earl of Roscommon, on his ex-

IV. The Tears of Amynta, for the Death

cellent Essay on translated Verse .. 591

of Damon. A Song

608

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King and Queen at their coming

to the House........

617

XVI. An Epilogue for the King's House. ib.

XVII. Prologue to the Loyal Brother; or,

the Persian Prince. (By Mr.

Southerne, 1682)...

618

XVIII. Epilogue to the same .....

ib.

XIX. Prologue to the Duke of Guise,

619

XX. Epilogue to the same ........

ib.

XXI. Another Epilogue, iutended to have

been spoken to the Play, before

it was forbidden last Summer ... ib.

XXII. Prologue to the University of Ox-

ford, spoken by Mr. Hart at the

acting of The Silent Woman ... 620

XXUL Epilogue spoken by the same . ib.

XXIV. Epilogue, spoken at Oxford, by

Mrs. Marshall ....

ib.

XXV. Prologue to the University of Ox-
ford

621
XXVI. Prologue to the University of Ox-
ford

ib.

XXVII. Epilogue to Constantine the Great.

(By Mr. N. Lee, 1683)

ib.

XXVIII. Prologue to the Disappointment ;

or the Mother in Fashion. (By

Mr. Southerne, 1684.)........ 622

XX*X. Prologue to the King and Queen,

upon the Union of the two Com-

panies iv 1686.....

ib.

XXX. Epilogue on the same Occasion... 623

XXXI. Prologue to the Princess of Cleves.

(By Mr. N. Lee, 1689.)

ib.

XXXI. Epilogue to the same.....

624

XXXÍU, Prologue to the Widow. Ranter.

(By Mrs. Behn, 1690.)

ib.

XXXIV. Prologue to Arviragus and Phi-

licia revived. (By Lodowick

Carlell, Esq.)

ib,

XXXV. Prologue to the Prophetess. By

Beaumont and Fletcher. Re-

vived by Mr. Dryden

ib.

XXXVI. Prologue to the Mistakes ......... 625

XXXVII. Epilogue to Henry the Second.

(By Mrs. Mountfort, 1693.) ib.

XXXVIII. A Prologue.--Gallants, a bashful

poet bids me say

626

XXXIX. Prologue to Albumazar

ib.

XL. An Epilogue.-You saw our wife

was chaste though throughly
tried

ib.

XLI. Prologue to the Husband his own

Cuckold

627

XLII, Prologue to the Pilgrim. Revived

for our Author's Benefit, anno

1700

ib.

XLIII. Epilogue to the same...............

ib.

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Edwund Waller was born on the third of March, 1605, at Colshill in Hertfordshire. His father was Robert Waller, esquire, of Agmondesham in Buckinghamshire, whose family was originally a branch of the Kentish Wallers; and his mother was the daughter of John Hampden, of Hampden in the same county, and sister to Hampden, the zealot of rebellion.

His father died while he was yet an infant, but left him a yearly income of three thousand five hundred pounds; which, rating together the value of money and the customs of life, we may reckon more than equivalent to ten thousand at the present time.

He was educated, by the care of his mother, at Eaton; and removed afterward to King's College in Cambridge. He was sent to parliament in bis eighteenth, if not in bis sateenth year, and frequented the court of James the First, where he heard a very remarkable conversation, which the writer of the Life prefixed to his Works, who seenis to have been well informed of facts, though he may sometimes err in chronology, has delivered as indubitably certain.

" He found Dr. Andrews, bishop of Winchester, and Dr. Neale, bishop of Durham, staneling behind his majesty's chair; and there happened something extraordinary," continues this writer, “ in the conversation those prelates had with the king, ou which Mr. Waller did often reflect. His majesty asked the bishops, ‘My lords, cannot I take my subjects' money when I want it, without all this formality of parliament?' The bishop of Durham readily answered, “God forbid, sir, but you should: you are the breath of our nostrils. Whereupon the king turned, and said to the bishop of Winchester

, “Well, my lord, what say you?'—'Sir,' replied the bishop, “I have no skill to judge of parliamentary cases.' The king answered, “No put-offs, my lord; answer me presently.'—' Then, sir,' said he, ' I think it is lawful for you to take my brother Neale's money; for he offers it.' Mr. Waller said, the company was pleased witla this answer, and the wit of it seemed to affect the king; for, a certain lord coming in soon after, his majesty cried out, • Oh, my lord, they say you lig with my lady.'—No,

says his lordship in corfusion ; ' but I like her company, because she has so much wit.'—"Why then,' says the king, do you not lig with my lord of Winchester there?'”

Waller's political and poetical life began nearly together. In his eighteenth year he Wrote the poem, that appears first in his works, on the Prince's Escape at St. Andero : a piece which justifies the observation made by one of his editors, that he attained, by a felicity like instinct, a style, which perhaps will never be obsolete; and that, “ were We to judge only by the wording, we could not know what was wrote at twenty, and mbat at fourscore." His versification was, in his first essay, such as it appears in liis

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