The Autobiographical Documentary in America

Voorkant
Univ of Wisconsin Press, 29 apr. 2002 - 264 pagina's
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Since the late 1960s, American film and video makers of all genres have been fascinated with themes of self and identity. Though the documentary form is most often used to capture the lives of others, Jim Lane turns his lens on those media makers who document their own lives and identities. He looks at the ways in which autobiographical documentaries—including Roger and Me, Sherman’s March, and Silverlake Life—raise weighty questions about American cultural life. What is the role of women in society? What does it mean to die from AIDS? How do race and class play out in our personal lives? What does it mean to be a member of a family? Examining the history, diversity, and theoretical underpinnings of this increasingly popular documentary form, Lane tracks a fundamental transformation of notions of both autobiography and documentary.

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Inhoudsopgave

Introduction
3
Historical Connections
11
An Unlikely Beginning
33
Narrative Chronology and Autobiographical Claims
48
Family and Self
94
Historical Intervention Writing Alterity and the Dialogic Engagement
145
Afterword
191
Notes
197
Filmography
222
Works Cited
224
Index
233
Copyright

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Over de auteur (2002)

Jim Lane is executive director of the Emerson College Los Angeles Center. A filmmaker since 1982, his documentaries include Long Time No See, Women of Prague, Background Action, I Am Not an Anthropologist, and East Meets West.

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