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vows had been exchanged and the troth | my foot began to ache again, so I thought that bound them plighted; and Adam, there wasn't any use in my sitting up any looking into Eve's face, smiled as he said, longer. But you were very late, Joan, * Whether for good luck or bad, the sun weren't you?" of our love has risen in a watery sky.” “Very early, more like," said Joan:

“'twas past wan before. I shut my eyes, CHAPTER XXI.

Why, I come home three times to see if Most of the actions and events of our uncle was back; and then I wouldn't lives are chameleon-hued : their colors stand it no longer, so I went and fetched vary according to the light by which we view them. Thus Eve, who the night “What, not from - where he was ?" before had seen nothing but happiness in exclaimed Eve. the final arrangement between Adam and Joan nodded her head. “Oh lors !" herself, awoke on the following morning she said, " 'tain't the fust time by many; with a feeling of dissatisfaction and a de- and,” she added in a tone of satisfaction, sire to be critical as to the rosy hues - I lets 'em know when they've brought which seemed then to color the advent of Joan Hocken down among 'em. I had their love.

Jerrem out, and uncle atop of un, 'fore The spring of tenderness which had they knawed where they was. Awh, I burst forth within her at sight of Adam's don't stand beggin' and prayin', not I: humility and subsequent despair had taken 'tis 'whether or no, Tom Collins,' when I Eve by surprise. She knew, and had come, I can tell 'ee.known for some time, that much within “Well, they'd stay a very long time beher was capable of answering to the de- fore they'd be fetched by me,” said Eve mands which Adam's pleading love would emphatically. most probably require; but that he had " Awh, don't 'ee say that, now,' inspired her with a passion which would turned Joan. " Where do 'ee think make her lay her heart at his feet, feeling there'd be the most harm in, then — sittin' for the time that, though he trampled on comfortable at home when you might go it, there it must stay, was a revelation down and 'tice 'em away, or the goin' entirely new, and, to Eve's temperament, down and doin' of it?” rather bumiliating. She had never felt “I've not a bit of patience with any. any sympathy with those lovesick maid- body who drinks,” exclaimed Eve, evadens whose very existence seemed swal- ing a direct answer. lowed up in another's being, and had been “Then you'll never cure anybody of it, proudly confident that even when suppli- my dear," replied Joan. “ You'm like cated she should never seem to stoop Adam there, I reckon — wantin' to set lower than to accept. Therefore, just as the world straight in one day, and all the we experience a sense of failure when we folks in it bottommost side upward; but, find our discernment led astray in our as I tell un, he don't go to work the right perception of a friend, so now, although way. They that can't steer 'ull never she studiously avoided acknowledging it, sail; and i'll bet any money that when it she had the consciousness that she had comes to be counted up how many glasses utterly misconceived her own character, ogrog's been turned away from uncle's and that the balance by which she had lips, there'll be more set to the score o' adjusted the strength of her emotions my coaxin' than ever ’ull be to Adam's had been a false one. A dread ran through bullyraggin'.” her lest she should be seized hold upon Perhaps so,” said Eve; and then, by some further inconsistency, and she wishing to avoid any argument into which resolved to set a watch on the outposts of Adam could be brought, she adroitly her senses, so that they might not betray changed the subject, and only indifferent her into further weakness.

topics were discussed until, their dressing These thoughts were still agitating her completed, the two girls were ready to go mind when Joan suddenly awoke, and down-stairs. after a time roused herself sufficiently to The first person who answered the say, “ Why, whatever made you pop off summons to breakfast was Uncle Zebe. in such a hurry last night, Eve? I runned dee - not heavy-eyed and shamefaced, as in a little after ten, and there wasn't no Eve had expected to see him, but bright signs of you nowheres ; and then I come and rosy-cheeked as an apple. He had upon Adam, and he told me you was gone been up and out since six o'clock, looking

after the repairs which a boat of his was Yes,” said Eve: “I was so tired, and I laid up to undergo, and now, as he came

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into the house fresh as a lark, he chir-dry frowns and nods of warning Joan tried ruped in a quavery treble, –

to convey her admonitions to old Zebe

dee, in the midst of which Adam entered, il Tom Truelove wooed the sweetest fair

and with a smile at Eve and an inclusive That e'er to tar was kind : Her face was of a booty rare —

nod to the rest of the party took a chair

and drew up to the table. That's for all the world what yourn is." Surely,” thought Eve, “he intends he said breaking off to bestow a smack- telling them.” ing kiss on Joan. “ So look sharp, like a But Adam sat silent and occupied with good little maid as you be, and gi'e us the plate before him. sommat to sit down for;” and he drew a “He can't think I can go living on chair to the table and began flourishing here with Joan, even for a single day, and the knife which had been set there for they not know it; and in her perplexity him. Then, catching sight of Eve, whose she turned on Adam a look full of inquiry face, in her desire to spare him, betrayed and meaning. an irrepressible look of consciousness, he Still, Adam did not speak: in his own exclaimed, “Why, they've bin tellin' up mind he was casting over the things he that I was a little over-free in my speech meant to say when, breakfast over and the last night about you, Eve: is there any two girls out of the way, he would invite truth in it, eh? I doan't fancy I could his father to smoke a pipe outside, during ha' said much amiss — did I?”

the companionship of which he intended “Oh, nothing to signify, uncle." taking old Zebedee decidedly to task, and,

“'Twas sommat 'bout you and Adam, putting his intended marriage with Eve warn't it?” he continued with a puzzled well to the front, clinch his arguments by air : “'tis all in my head here, though I the startling announcement that unless can't zackly call it to mind. That's the some reformation was made he devil o' bein' a little o’ertook that ways," would leave his native place and seek a he added with the assurance of meeting home in a foreign land. Such words and ready sympathy: “'tis so bafflin' to set such threats as these could not be uttered things all ship-shape the next mornin'. Ito a father by a son save when they two minds so far as this, that it had somehow stood quite alone; and Adam, after meetto do with me holdin' to it that you and ing a second look from Eve, shook his Adam was goin' to be man and wife; but head, feeling satisfied that she would if you axes for the why and the wherefore, know that only some grave requirement I'm blessed if I can tell 'ee."

deterred him from immediately announc“Why, whatever put such as that into ing the happiness which henceforth yas your head ?” said Joan sharply.

to crown his life. But our intuition, at · Wa’al, the liquor, I reckon,” laughed the best, is somewhat narrow, and where Zebedee. " And, somehow or 'nother, the heart is most concerned most faulty: Maister Adam didn't seem to have over therefore Eve, and Adam too, selt each much relish for the notion ; and he disappointed in the other's want of acquiscrewed up his face and hugged himself escence, and inclined to be critical on the together as if his whole body was tickled lack of mutual sympathy. at his son's discomfiture. But there! Suddenly the door opened and in never you mind that, Eve,” he added walked Jerrem, smiling and apparently hastily: “there's more baws than one more radiant than usual under the knowlto Pólperro, and I'll wager for a half- edge that he was more than usually an score o chaps ready to hab 'ee without offender. Joan who had her own reasons yer waitin' to be took up by my son for being very considerably put out with Adam."

him, was not disposed to receive him Poor Eve! it was certainly an embar- very graciously; Adam vouchsafed him rassing situation to be placed in, for, with no 'notice whatever; Uncle Zebedee, opno wish to conceal her engagement, to pressed by the sense of former good-felannounce it herself alone, and unaided by lowship, thought it discreet not to evince even the presence of Adam, was a task too much cordiality; so that the onus of she naturally shrank from. In the en- the morning's welcome was thrown upon deavor to avoid any direct reply she sat Eve, who, utterly ignorant of any offence watching anxiously for Adam's arrival, Jerrem had given, thought it advisable to her sudden change of manner construed make amends for the pettish impatience by Zebedee into the effect of wounded she feared she had been betrayed into on vanity, and by Joan into displeasure at the previous morning. her uncle's undue interference. By sun- old Zebedee, whose resolve seldom

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lasted over ten minutes, soon fell into the after I'd parted with you last night that swing of Jerrem's flow of talk; a little she gave me her answer.' later

on and Joan was forced to put in a “ Awh!” said the old man, only half word; so that the usual harmony was just propitiated. • Wa-al, I s'pose you can beginning to recover itself when, in an- settle your consarns without my help; swer to a remark which Jerrem had made, but I can tell 'ee this much, that if my Eve managed to turn the laugh so clev- Joanna had took so long afore she could erly back upon him that Zebedee, well make her mind up, I'm blamed if her pleased to see what good friends they ever should ha' had the chance o' bein? were growing, exclaimed,“ Stop her your mother, Adam – so there!” mouth! stop her mouth, lad ! I'd ha' Adam bit his lip with vexation. done it when I was your years twenty “There's no need for me to enter upon times over 'fore this. Her's too sarcy - any further explanations,” he said: too sarcy by half, her is."

“Éve's satisfied, I'm satisfied, so I don't Up started Jerrem, but Adam was be- see why you shouldn't be satisfied." fore him. “I don't know whether what Awh, I'm satisfied enough,” said ZebI'm going to say is known to anybody edee ; "and, so far as that goes, though here already,” he burst out, “but I think I ain't much of a hand at speechifyin', I it's high time that some present should hopes that neither of 'ee ’ull never have be told by me that Eve has promised to no raison to ent yer bargain. Eve's be my wife;" and, turning, he cast a look a fine bowerly maid, so you'm well of angry defiance at Jerrem, who, thor- matched there; and so long as she's oughly amazed, gradually sank down and ready to listen to all you say and bide took possession of his chair again, while by all you tells her, why 'twill be set fair old Zebedee went through the dumb show and sail easy." of giving a long whistle, and Joan, mut- 'I can assure you Eve isn't prepared tering an unmeaning something, ran has to do anything of the sort, Uncle Zebetily out of the room. Eve, angry and dee,” exclaimed Eve, unable to keep confused, turned from white to red and silence any longer. “ I've always been from red to white.

told if I'd nothing else I've got the PasA silence ensued one of those pauses cals' temper; and that, according to your when some event of our lives seems turned own showing, isn't very fond of sitting into a gulf to separate us from our former quiet and being rode over rough-shod.” surroundings.

The whistle which Uncle Zebedee had Adam was the first to speak, and with tried to choke at its birth now came out a touch of irony he said, “ You're none of shrill, long, and expressive, and Adam, you very nimble at wishing us joy, I jumping up, said, “Come, come, Eve : fancy."

we've had enough of this. Surely there “And no wonder, you've a-tooked us isn't any need to take such idle talk as all aback so," said old Zebedee.. "'T serious matter. If you and me hadn't seems to me I'm foaced to turn it round seen some good in one another and round afore I can swaller it for rale shouldn't have taken each other, I supright-down truth.”

pose; and, thank the Lord, we haven't to Why, is it so very improbable, then ? " please anybody but our two selves.” asked Adam, already repenting the abrupt. "Wa-al, 'tis to be hoped you'll find that ness of the disclosure.

task aisier than it looks," retorted UnWa-al, 'twas no later than last night cle Zebedee with a touch of sarcasm; that you was swearin' agen and cussin' while Jerrem, after watching Adam go everybody from stem to starn for so out, endeavored to throw a tone of remuch as mentionin' it as likely. Now," gret into the flattering nothings he now he added, with as much show of displeas- whispered by way of congratulation, but ure as his cheery, weatherbeaten old face Eve turned impatiently away from him. would admit of, “I'll tell 'ee the mind She had no further inclination to talk or I've got to’ard these sort o' games: if to be talked to; and Uncle Zebedee havyou see fit to board folks in the smoke, ing by this time sought solace in a pipe, why do it and no blame to 'ee, but hang Jerrem joined him outside, and the two me if I can stomach 'ee sailin' under false sauntered away together toward the quay. colors.”

Left to the undisturbed indulgence of “There wasn't anything of false colors her own reflections, Eve's mood was no about us, father," said Adam in a more enviable one the more difficult to bear conciliatory tone; “for, though I had because she had to control the various certainly spoken to Eve, it was not until | emotions struggling within her. She felt

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it was time for plain speaking between mind, and, full of compunction at the her and Adam, and rightly judged that bare suspicion of having wounded that a proper understanding come to at once generous heart, Eve jumped up with the would be the safest means of securing intention of seeking her and of bringing future comfort. Turn and twist Adam's about a satisfactory explanation. She abrupt announcement as she would, she had not far to go before she came upon could assign but one cause for it, and that Joan, rubbing and scrubbing. away as if cause was an overweening jealousy; and the welfare of all Polperro depended on as the prospect came before her of a life- the amount of energy she could throw time spent in the midst of doubt and sus- into her work. Her face was Aushed and picion, the strength of her love seemed her voice unsteady, the natural conseto die away and her heart grew faint within quences of such violent exercise, and her. For surely if the demon of jealousy which Eve's approach but seemed to lend could be roused by the sight of common- greater force to. place attentions from one who was in “ Joan, I want to speak to you." every way like a brother — for so in Eve's "Awh, my dear, I can't listen to no eyes Jerrem seemed to be — what might spakin' now,” replied Joan hastily, “and not be expected if at any time circum- the tables looking as they do." stances threw her into the mixed com- “But Tabithy always scrubs the tables, pany of strangers ? Eve had seen very Joan : why should you do it?” little of men, but whenever chance had “Tabithy's arms ain't half so young as afforded her the opportunity of their so- mine — worse luck for me or for she !" ciety she had invariably met with atten- Having by this time gained a little intion, and had felt inwardly gratified by sight into Joan's peculiaritics, Eve argued the knowledge that she was attracting no further, but sat herself down on a conadmiration; but now, if she gave way to venient seat, waiting for the time when this prejudice of Adam's, every time an the rasping sound of the brush would eye was turned toward her she would be come to an end. Her patience was put filled with fear, and each time a look was to no very great tax, for after a few min. cast in her direction her heart would sink utes Joan flung the brush along the table, with dread.

exclaiming, “ Awh, drabbit the ole scrubWhat should she do? Give him up? bin'! I must give over. I b’lieve I've Even with the prospect of possible mis- had enuf of it for this time,'t all events.” ery staring at her, Eve could not say yes, “Joan, you ain't hurt with me, are and before the thought had more than you?” said Eve, trying to push her into shaped itself a dozen suggestions were the seat from which she had just risen. batiling down the dread alternative. She "I wanted to be the first to tell you, only would change him, influence him, convert that Adam spoke as he did, and took all him - anything but give him up or give I was going to say out of my mouth. It in to him. She forgot how much easier leaves you to think me dreadfully sly". it is to conceive plans than to carry them “Awh, there wasn't much need for out — to arrange speeches than to utter tellin' me,” said Joan with a sudden relax them. She forgot that only the evening of manner. " When I didn't shut my before, when, an opportunity being af- eyes o' purpose I could tell, from the forded, she had resolved upon telling first, what was certain to happen.” Adam the whole circumstance of Reuben “ It was more than I could, then,” said May and the promise made between them, Eve. “I hadn't given it a thought that while the words were yet on her lips she Adam meant to speak to me, and when had drawn them back because Adam had he asked me I was quite taken aback, said he knew that the promise was “noth- and said 'No'for ever so long." ing but the promise of a letter;" and “What made 'ee change yer mind so Eve's courage had suddenly given way, suddent, then?” said Joan bluntly. and by her silence she had led him to Eve hesitated. “I hardly know," she conclude that nothing else had passed said, with a little confusion. “I think it between them. Joan had spoken of the was seeing him so cast down made me envious grudge which Adam had borne feel so dreadfully sorry.' toward Jerrem because he had shared in “H'm!” said Joan. · Didn't 'ee never his mother's heart, so that this was not feel no sorrow for t’other poor chap that the first time Adam had dropped in gall wanted to have 'ee - he to London, Reuto mingle with the cup of his love. ben May?

The thought of Joan brought the fact “ Not enough to make me care in that of her unexplained disappearance to Eve's I way for him: I certainly never did.”

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“And do you care for Adam, then?” more than half the men of the place had " I think I do."

asked you to marry them.” 16 Think?"

“Did he?” said Joan, not wholly dis“Well, I am sure I do."

pleased that Adam should hold this opin“That's better. Well, Eve, I'll say ion. “Awh, and ax they may, I reckon, this far;” and Joan gave a sigh before afore I shall find a man to say · Yes' to." the other words would come out: “I'd “ That is what I used to think myself," rather it should be you than anybody else said Eve. I ever saw.

“Iss, and so you found it till Roger The struggle with which these words put the question," replied Joan decisively. were said, their tone and the look in Then, after a minute's pause, she added, Joan's face, seemed to reveal a state of “ What be 'ee goin' to do 'bout the poor feeling which Eve had not suspected. sawl to London, then -eh? You must Throwing her arms round her, she cried tell he somehow.out, “Oh, Joan, why didn't he choose “Oh, I don't see that,” said Eve. "I you? You would have been much better mean to write to him, because I promised for him than me.”

I would ; and I shall tell him that I've “Lord bless the maid !” — and Joan made up my mind not to go back, but I tried to laugh through her tears “Isha’n't say anything more. There isn't wouldn't ha' had un if he'd axed me. any need for it, that I see - at least, not Why, there'd ha' bin murder 'tween us yet a while.” 'fore a month was out: us 'ud ha' bin “ Best to tell un all," argued Joan. hung for one 'nother. No: now don't 'ee “Why shouldn't 'ee? 'Tis the same, so take no such stuff as that into yer head, far as you'm concerned, whether he's 'cos there's no sense in it. Adam's never killed to wance or dies by inches." looked 'pon me not more than a sister; But Eve was not to be persuaded. and, breaking down, Joan sobbed hysteri- “There isn't any reason why I should,” cally; “and when you two's married I she said. shall feel zackly as if he was a brother, “No reason ?” replied Joan. and be gladder ihan e'er a one else to see Eve, my dear,” she added, " don't 'ee let how happy you makes un.”

happiness harden your heart: if love is “That's if I do make him happy," said sweet to gain, think how bitter 'tis to Eve sadly.

lose; and, by all you've told me, you'll There's no fear but you'll do that,” forfeit a better man than most in Reuben said Joan, resolutely wiping the tears May." from her eyes; "and 'twill be your own fault if you bain't happy too yourself, Eve. Adam's got his fads to put up with, and his fancies same as other men have, and a masterful temper to keep under,

From Fraser's Magazine. as nobody can tell better than me; but

SCHOOL. for rale right-down goodness I shouldn't know where to match his fellow — not if MANY students of Shakespeare on I was to search the place through; and, reading the above heading may be dismind 'ee, after all, that's something to be posed to turn away, partly from the feelproud of in the man you've got to say ing expressed by Mr. Ward in his “Hismaister to."

tory of English Dramatic Literature,” Eve gave a little smile : “But he must" that the vexed question as to Shakelet me be mistress, you know, Joan." speare's classical attainments is in reality

“All right! only don't you stretch that not worth discussing," and partly from the too far,” said Joan warningly," or no good conviction that whether of special inter’ull come of it; and be foreright in all you est or not the subject has been worked do, and spake the truth to un. I've many out. This feeling is certainly natural, a time wished I could, but with this to and I must confess to having a good deal hide o' that one's and that to hush up o' of sympathy with it myself. Those who tother's, I know he holds me for a down- are familiar with the treatment of Shakeright liard; and so I am by his measure, speare's scholarship by Whalley and I 'spects."

Upton, or even at times in the useful “I'm sure you're nothing of the sort, notes of the variorum edition, may be Joan,” said Éve. “Adam's always say- pardoned for feeling only a languid intering how much people think of you. He est in the question. Upton's cloud of told me only yesterday that he was certain references to Greek and Roman authors

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