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THE

CRITICAL REVIEW;

OR

ANNALS OF LITERATURE.

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PRINTED BY AND FOR S. HAMILTON, FALCON COURT,

FLEET-STREET.

1799.

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CRITICAL REVIEW.

SEPTEMBER, 1799.

Travels in England, Scotland, and the Hebrides; undertaken for the Purpose of examining the State of the Arts, the. Sciences, Natural Hijicry and Manners, in Great Britain: containing Mineralogical Deferiptions of the Couniry round Newcanile; of the flountains of Derbyshire; of the Environs of Edinburgh, Glasgou, Perth, and St. Andrews; of Inverary, and other Parts of Argylejhire; and of the Cave of Fingal.

Translated from the French of B. Faujas Saint-Fond, Sc. 2 Vols. 8vo. 145. Boards. Ridgway. 1799.

WHEN men of science and philosophy visit a country, we may expect to reap much greater improvement from the narratives of their travels, than from the crude accounts of fuperficial observers, even though the latter may not be deflitute of talents. Of the former description is M. Faujas St. Fond. He visited Great-Britain in the year 1784; but his travels were not prepared for the press before 1792; and, after that time, the dillurbances in France long prevented their appearance. But the laws (he observes) have now resumed their empire ; and the sciences will soon follow in their train.'

Lively, ingenious, and entertaining, M. St. Fond gives an amusing account of the English philosophers, by whom he was received with great attention. Of fir Jofeph Banks he speaks with respectul regard, without adding any invidious insinuations, in which some foreigners, in return for similar attentions, have induized themselves. From this part of the work, we will select the account of Whitehurst.

• He was a native of Derbyfrire, and resided a long time in the principal town of that county. His views and his meditations were ihus directed to the face of a country truly extraordinary, and interesting to naturaliits.

• Whitehurst forned himself at an epoch when this science was not far advanced. But if he has commitied errors (and who is cotirely free from them :) they are owing, not so much to the uncertain staic of mineralogy at that period, as to a sort of religious awe and restraint which often fettered the progress of men of genius, and com

CRIT. REV. Vol. XXVII. Sept. 1799.

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