The Life of Nelson

Voorkant
American book Company, 1895 - 304 pagina's
 

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Southey is perhaps best known as the friend of Wordsworth and Coleridge in their early "Lake Poet" days who wrote some often denigrated but in my experience readable verse fantasies (the Curse of ... Volledige review lezen

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Pagina 301 - Speak, father!" once again he cried, "If I may yet be gone!" And but the booming shots replied, And fast the flames rolled on.
Pagina 300 - THE boy stood on the burning deck Whence all but he had fled ; The flame that lit the battle's wreck Shone round him o'er the dead.
Pagina 303 - Again! again! again! And the havoc did not slack, Till a feeble cheer the Dane, To our cheering sent us back; Their shots along the deep slowly boom — Then ceased — and all is wail, As they strike the shatter'd sail; Or, in conflagration pale, Light the gloom.
Pagina 291 - The most triumphant death is that of the martyr; the most awful that of the martyred patriot; the most splendid that of the hero in the hour of victory: and if the chariot and the horses of fire had been vouchsafed for Nelson's translation, he could scarcely have departed in a brighter blaze of glory.
Pagina 267 - At half-past Ten drove from dear, dear Merton, where I left all which I hold dear in this World, to go to serve my King and Country. May the Great God whom I adore enable me to fulfil the expectations of my Country, and if it is His good pleasure that I should return, my thanks will never cease being offered up to the Throne of His Mercy. If it is His good providence to cut short my days upon Earth, I bow with the greatest submission, relying that He will protect those so dear to me, that I may leave...
Pagina 281 - ... brave officers, perhaps, at this moment thought of Nelson with gratitude, for a circumstance which had occurred on the preceding day. Admiral Collingwood, with some of the captains, having gone on board the Victory, to receive instructions, Nelson inquired of him, where his captain was ? and was told, in reply, that they were not upon good terms with each other.
Pagina 286 - Hardy stood over him in silence for a moment or two, then knelt again and kissed his forehead. " Who is that ? " said Nelson; and being informed, he replied,
Pagina 276 - His plan of defense was as well conceived, and as original, as the plan of attack. He formed the fleet in a double line, every alternate ship being about a cable's length to windward of her second ahead and astern. Nelson, certain of a triumphant issue to the day, asked Blackwood what he should consider as a victory. That officer answered, that, considering the handsome way in which...
Pagina 291 - ... greatest of our own, and of all former times, was scarcely taken into the account of grief. So perfectly indeed had he performed his part, that the maritime war, after the battle of Trafalgar, was considered at an end : the fleets of the enemy were not merely defeated, but destroyed : new navies must be built, and a new race of seamen reared for them, before the possibility of their invading our shores could again be contemplated.
Pagina 213 - You know, Foley, I have only one eye — I have a right to be blind sometimes...

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