The works of Samuel Johnson, Volume 11

Couverture
F. C. and J. Rivington, 1823
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Page 473 - Fortunate senex ergo tua rura manebunt. et tibi magna satis quamvis lapis omnia nudus limosoque palus obducat pascua iunco.
Page 316 - This praise the general interest of mankind requires to be given to writers who please and do not corrupt, who instruct and do not weary. But to them all human eulogies are vain, whom I believe applauded by angels, and numbered with the juat.
Page 297 - He might have shown, that these "hunters, whose game is man," have many sports analogous to our own. As we drown whelps and kittens, they amuse themselves, now and then, with sinking a ship, and stand round the fields of Blenheim, or the walls of Prague, as we encircle a cockpit.
Page 284 - This author and Pope perhaps never saw the miseries which they imagine thus easy to be borne. The poor indeed are insensible of many little vexations which sometimes embitter the possessions and pollute the enjoyments of the rich. They are not pained by casual incivility, or mortified by the mutilation of a compliment ; but this happiness is like that of a malefactor, who ceases to feel the cords that bind him when the pincers are tearing his flesh.
Page 318 - It has now been fashionable, for near half a century, to defame and vilify the house of Stuart, and to exalt and magnify the reign of Elizabeth. The Stuarts have found few apologists, for the dead cannot pay for praise; and who will, without reward, oppose the tide of popularity?
Page 478 - They are to observe the alterations which time is always making in the modes of life, that they may gratify every generation with a picture of themselves. Thus love is uniform, but courtship is perpetually varying...
Page 297 - He imagines that as we have not only animals for food, but choose some for our diversion, the same privilege may be allowed to some beings above us, " who may deceive, torment, or destroy us for the ends only of their own pleasure or utility.
Page 238 - JOURNEY, From Portsmouth to Kingston upon Thames, through Southampton, Wiltshire, &c. with miscellaneous thoughts, moral and religious ; in sixty-four letters : addressed to two ladies of the partie. To which is added, an Essay on Tea, considered as pernicious to health, obstructing industry, and impoverishing the nation...
Page 240 - Johnson candidly describes himself as " a hardened and shameless tea-drinker, who has for many years diluted his meals with only the infusion of this fascinating plant ; whose kettle has scarcely time to cool ; who with tea amuses the evening, with tea solaces the midnights, and with tea welcomes the morning.
Page 414 - ... signatures in the Spectator. The nicety of these minute allusions I shall exemplify by another instance, which I take this occasion to mention, because, as I am told, the commentators have omitted it.

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