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Sawbridgeworth Rev. H. Tyler

Donation ..... .......... 1 0 0 Subscriptions................ 17 16 6

Interest...................... 2 13 8 Collection after Sermon by

-- 107 2 10 Rev. Mr. Jarratt ........... 3 8 11 Missionary Boxes............ 2 3 1

580 6 3 23 8 6

Less Expenses......... 13 5 10 Ware-Old Independent Meeting

567 0 5 Rev. E. MiallSubscriptions................ 8 8 4

Lincolnshire-Lincoln Auxiliary Society Collection after Sermon by

:

R. Coupland, Esq., Treas.-On Account .. 40 00 Rey. J. Campbell ..........

- 14 0 8 | Middlesex-Mill Hill Grammar School, and

Village Association
New Independent Chapel-

Subscriptions, &c. ............ 3 3 0
Rev. J. Lockyer-

Miss Crump's Young Ladies... 2 10 0
Subscriptions.....

2 1 0

The Pupils, &c., at the GramCollection after Sermon by

mar School ................ 4 14 0
Rev, J. Campbell.......... 3 10 3

Collection after Sermon by
-
5 11 3

Rev. Dr. Morison. 5 0 6

Less Expenses .. 0 7 0 224 1 6

4 13 6 Less Expenses.orsvoed 7 19 4

15 06 Barnet-Wood Street Sunday School 216 2 2 Per Mr. W. Brunt....................:

3 17 6 Edmonton-Rev. J. L. Davies (deceased), by Mr. Pitt ..........

800 Kent-Dimchurch-Miss Coleman's School. 1

Totteridge-Mrs. Puget, for the Support Deptford-Butt Lane Meeting

of a Native Teacher in South Tra. Rev. J. T. Barker ................

... 15 00

vancore .....................(a).... 10 0 0

Tottenham-M R. Lloyd-Towards the Lancashire-West Auxiliary Society

Support of Native Schools in India, J. Job, Esq., Treasurer

(2 years) .............................. 1 0 Liverpool-Subscription ........ 100

Uxbridge-Rev. Mr. Stamper

Subscriptions and Collections.......... Bethesda Chapel-Collections

58 18 2 after Sermons by Rev. J. Carruthers and Rev. J. Kelly 111 0 0

Northamptonshire -Peterborough Ladies' Branch, per Mrs. Hey,

Rev. J. E. Isaac

Collected at Praye • Meet. worth, Treasurer .......... 40 00

ings, &c. .................. Missionary Boxes of

2 4 1 Juvenile Society, per Mr.

Collected by
0

Mrs. Ellis ................... 6
Heyworth.................. 20 0

9 0

Miss Stokes ................. Agnes Cartlich .....

.. 0

0 10 ich ...............

8 0 10

Collection after Sermon by Mary Little...... .. 0 16 6

Rev. J. Blackburn ......... 4 14 7

173 6 Great George Street Chapel

13 18 4 Collections after Sermons by

Less Expenses.... 0 7 4
Rev. R. Newton and Rev. J.

13 11 0 Edmonds.................112 6 4 Publie Meeting .............. 31 8 0

Nottinghamshire-Nottingham Auxiliary!
Collection after Sermon by

Society-R. Morley, Esq., Treasurer-
Rev. J. Bunting ............ 16 7 11

Mansfield ..........
Ladies' Branchi, per Mrs. Raf-

...... 18 9 10

Collection after Sermon...... 20 13 10 fies, Treasurer.............. 72 12 10

Sunday School....

.. 1 3 7 Juvenile Society, per J. Jones,

Castle Gate................... 58 13 4
Treasurer.................. 7

Friar Lane...............
William Kay, Esq...(pon.).. 50 0 0

32 13 8

St. James' .................. 20 00 A School-room Missionary Box 5

Salem Chapel..... Toxush Park Girls' Sunday

2 4 1

Collection after Public Meeting 23 8 10
School.................... 1 0 0

Heanor......................
- Boys' Sunday

3 10 0 Keyworth ....

.. 5 0 0 School .......

C. H. Clarke....(DON.)...... 110 Mr. Kay's Servants' Missionary

3 Box.......................

186 18 0 10

2 299 16 1

Less Expenses............

30 11 3 Hindley-St. Paul's Chapel 3 11 0

156 Per Rev. W. Howe..........

6 11 Hanover Chapel-Collections after Sermons by Rev. E.

Somersetshire-Bristol Auxiliary Society-
Edmonds and Rev. J. Topstal 6 10 0

R. Ash, Esq., Treasurer................1055 4 0 Newington Chapel - Collec

Bath Auxiliary Society
tions after Sermons by Rev.

J. C. Hartsinck, Esq., Treas.. 121 16 6
J. Edmonds and Rev. P.

Towards the Support of Na.
Thomson.................. 11 6 6

tive Schools in India ..... 3 3 6 Gloucester Street Chapel-Col.

125 00
Jections after Sermons by
Rev. J. Widdows and Rev.

Sussex-Lewes-T. Dicke
S. Saunders................ 15 0 0

A Lady at Madeira ......

....... 100 St. Helens-Collections by Rev. W. Vint....... .......... 40 6 6

Yorkshire-Sheffield and Attercliffe Auxiliary
Great Cross-Hall Street Chapel

Society--Mr. W. F. Rawson, Treasurer-
Juvenile Society, by Mr.

(On Account) .....

4200 Hughes, Treasurer........., 26 16 1

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Scotland-Greenock ,

Female Missionary Association

Per J. Ker, Esq....................... 10 0 Perth Auxiliary Society - Rev. J. Newlands l0 0 Torres-A. C........................... 5 0 Aberdeen--Auxiliary Missionary Society Per P. Duguid, Esq. .......

... 25 0 Juvenile Missionary Society

Mr. J. Barker, Treasurer-
Male Branch

10 6 5
Female Branch.............. 10 2 10
Qnarterly Collections ........ 1 12 6
Bridge of Don - Heathen's

Friend ..................... 1 5 0
Missionary Boxes............

0 14 8
Interest .....................

090

Wales South Auxiliary Society

Carnarvonshire Association

Rev. D. Peter-
Rhydy bont-Rev. W. Jones-

Collection ................... 1 10 6
Sunday School .............. 106
Lan Vaughan School ......... 1 100
Capel Nonni-Collection...... 1 13 9
Sunday School ............... 2 0 0
Miss Walters, towards the

Education of Native

Females in India ......... 1 0 0 Subscriptions ................ 1 1 0

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Additional Donations towards Relieving the Distress at Hankey (South Africa), occasioned by the late

Inundation ; particulars of which were detailed in August Chronicle, p. 363.

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The thanks of the Directors are respectfully presented to the following:

To Thomas Pringle, Esg., for Prizes for Negro Children in the West Indies. Young Men at Messrs. Thomas and Sons, Oswestry, for Gold Ends. Mr. Macdonald, Mrs. Child, Mr. Woolams, and Anonymous, for Volumes and Numbers of the Evangelical Magazine, Work Bags, &c. &c.

Printed by John Haddon and Co., 21, Ivy Lane,

SUPPLEMENT

TO THE

EVANGELICAL MAGAZINE.

: FOR THE YEAR 1832.

MEMOIR OF THE LATE MR. THOMAS SALMON,

of ULVERSTONE, LANCASHIRE.

THERE is, perhaps, no depart. led to admire the loveliness and exment of history more truly interest- cellence of moral worth, exhibiting, ing and profitable than that of in almost every page, the benevobiography. The different charac- lence of its spirit, and the unbendters of inen, with the almost end- ing firmness of its integrity: or, less variety of light and shade on the other hand, our hearts may which distinguish them from each be pained by beholding before us a other, and give them individuality, reckless and abandoned character, are subjects which cannot be pe- on which may be seen the stains rused without considerable advan of indelible infamy, and “written tage by the contemplative mind. within and without with lamentaEvery life is a volume differing, tion, and mourning, and woe.” it is true, wonderfully in the in- These, I say, may all be made suhterest they afford, yet each one servient to the improvement of presenting something which may be mankind, according to the light in rendered beneficial. In some, we which they are viewed. The efare presented with the gradual un forts of the learned, the noble, and foldings of a powerful mind, tower- the virtuous, have a tendency to ing above its fellows, and erecting, excite in us a spirit of emulation, in its progress, gigantic monuments and to stir up the soul to similar of its strength, to stand amidst fu- deeds “ of high emprize;" while ture generations as the memorials the conduct and fate of the wicked of its energy. In others, we behold afford an awful lesson of the cona bright and lofty genius, strug- sequences of guilt, and should be a gling, perhaps, at the first, with all beacon-light to warn us of the the disadvantages of an imperfect rocks on which they split and were education, and with the difficulties, lost for ever. But of all the detoo, of pecuniary embarrassments, scriptions of character, whose life yet rising at last to eminence and and whose death may be equally fame; while in some, again, we are productive of advantage to the VOL. X.

3 p

living, there is one which stands ber of years, “a life unspotted from pre-eminent- that is, the Chris- the world,” and whose path was tian. If consistent with his prin- indeed like the sun of heaven, ciples, he is lovely in life, and “shining more and more until the lovely in death. His character perfect day.” Thinking, therefore, is a fine and beautiful epistle that such an example cannot but be “ known” at once as the impress productive of interest and profit, of God," and read of all men;" — and since “ the righteous are to be by the good, with pleasure--by the bad in everlasting remembrance," wicked, with admiration and re- this short memorial of departed spect; while, in death, there is worth is submitted to the public. generally a softened splendour Thomas Salmon, the subject of around him, and a holy triumph this memoir, was born July 5th, in his soul, which, while it strength- 1758, at Shaw, in Cumberland, a ens the faith of the righteous, and few miles from Broughton, a marcannot but excite the envy of the ket-town ten miles north of Ulverangodly, proclaims that he is en- stone. The advantages of his childtering the vestibule of heaven. To hood were extremely small. He record, then, the character and has frequently been heard to say end of such an individual, is the that he never went to school for pleasing task which is allotted to more than two weeks; not that he the writer; yet, delightful as it is was idly inclined, or averse to into pay this tribute of respect to the struction, but it was owing to the memory of one who was dear to circumstances in which he was him as a brother, the writer feels placed. At twelve years of age, he that, in giving to the public a faith- was apprenticed to a Mr. Dawson, ful and unbiassed memoir of his tailor, residing at Broughton, and tried and early friend, he has to who, fortunately for the boy, was accomplish a work of considerable religiously disposed, and had a difficulty. But he will endeavour taste for evangelical preaching; to do it as impartially as possible; for, perceiving that the ministry at and should it be thought, by any his own parish church was not in of your readers, that it is coloured strict accordance with the faithful too highly, or that too much has exhibition of gospel truth, he was been made of the excellencies of in the habit of walking, on the his character, he entreats pardon Sabbath-day, to Ulverstone, a disof their charity for the error of his tance of ten miles, to hear such heart; and if, on the other hand, ministers as came there occasionit may be thought, by his friends, ally to preach the gospel, before that justice has not been done to the present Independent chapel his inestimable worth, and that too was built. T. S., the apprentice, little has been said of the loveli- from the encouragement of his ness of his disposition, and the con- master, as well as from his own sistency of his life, he hopes they inclination, frequently accompawill pardon the error of his judg- nied him across the intervening ment. He has not to record the hills and moors to hear those exefforts of genius, nor the splendid cellent men, who at that time achievements of a powerful mind; preached at Ulverstone in hired but he has to pourtray, what is to factories and barns. Notwithstandhim a far more pleasing picture, ing such local disadvantages, he the virtues of one who, “ in the soon became enamoured of the midst of a crooked and perverse doctrines of the cross, hearing and generation,” maintained, for a num- receiving them, “not in word only, but in demonstration of the Spirit until Nov. 18th, 1786, when a Mr. · and of power,” and finding, expe- Ellis, from Wales, became the rimentally, the gospel of the grace pastor. He, however, left on May of God to be a savour of spiritual 24th, 1791, and was succeeded by life, peace, and joy to his soul. a Mr. Williams, also from the Nor did he lose the relish all his principality, May 20th, 1792, who days.

left in July, 1794. He was sucAt the expiration of his appren ceeded by Mr. Atkins, on Oct. ticeship, he came to reside at Ul. 11th, 1794, who was ordained verstone ; -and it appears that, June 3rd, 1795, but left Ulvershortly after his arrival, he was ap- stone Oct. 12th, 1801, becoming pointed clerk of the newly-erected subsequently, I believe, classical meeting-house, which was opened tutor at the old College, Hoxton. July 8th, 1778. And as the cir- They were then supplied by Mr. cumstances of this chapel, on ac- Collins, from Kendal, who conticount of its insulated situation and nued with them until his death. distance from London, are not which took place Jan. 7th, 1805. generally known, and as its in- Mr. Collins was succeeded by Mr. terests are in a manner identified Barber, who left after having been with the individual before us, the with them for three years; and writer will perhaps be pardoned for who was followed by J. Davies, the introduction of a list of its mi- Sept. 12th, 1809, who, through the nisters to the present time. The patienos and tender mercies of the services on the occasion of its open great Shepherd of the flock, has ing were performed by the Rev. continued his labours to the present Messrs. G. Burder, then of Lan. time. In the subject of this memoir caster, Gibbons, and Collins. Mr. he at all times found a steady, Burder preached from Ps. cxxxvi. sympathising friend, and diligent 1 : “O give thanks unto the Lord, assistant, faithfully discharging the for he is good, and his mercy en- duties of his office as deacon of the dureth for ever;" Mr. Gibbons, church. . from Matt. xvi. 18 : “ Upon this From several letters, found rock I will build my church ;" Mr. amongst his papers, it appears that Collins, from 1 Cor. iii. 11:“Other a very intimate friendship and corfoundation can no man lay," &c. respondence early commenced beAfter the dedication of the build- tween Thomas Salmon and Thomas ing to the worship of Jehovah, it Bond, then clerk of the Indepenwas supplied by the Rev. Messrs. dent meeting at Lancaster. It is, Burder, Alliot, and Philips, for however, much to be regretted, the space of two years; when Mr. that the letters of Mr. Salmon are Gibbons accepted an invitation from not to be found, as they would no the people to become their pastor, doubt have furnished us with the and was crdained July 5th, 1780. most faithful transcript of his mind Mr. Philips, of Ellswick, gave the and character; for there is nothing, charge, from Rev. ii. 10 : “ Be thou perhaps, which so much discovers faithful unto death,” &c.; and Mr. the man, as the epistles of friendG. Burder preached to the people ship--when the soul unbosoms itfrom Heb. xiii. 17.

self, and “out of the abundance of Mr. Gibbons's ministerial labours the heart the mouth speaketh.” terminated Sept. 18th, 1785, and The introduction of one letter from he died Dec. i1th the same year. Mr. Bond may serve to show their After his decease, the congregation mutual confidence and regard for was supplied by different ministers each other. It is evidently in reply

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