The Night Is Large: Collected Essays, 1938-1995

Voorkant
Macmillan, 15 jul. 1997 - 608 pagina's
In The Night Is Large, Martin Gardner has assembled forty-seven challenging and inquisitive essays into a work that places him at the heart of twentieth-century American intellectual culture. Delving into an immense range of topics, from philosophy and literature to social criticism to mathematics and science, with essays that date from 1930s to the 1990s, Martin Gardner has astounded readers with his insight and erudition. The Night Is Large is the crowning achievement of his extraordinary career.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Gebruikersrecensie  - hardlyhardy - LibraryThing

Martin Gardner (1914-2010) was something of a Renaissance writer. He seemed able to write about anything, from "Alice in Wonderland" to string theory, like an authority. He wrote books by the dozens ... Volledige review lezen

LibraryThing Review

Gebruikersrecensie  - quantum_flapdoodle - LibraryThing

The range of essays in this book lends a great deal of interest, as they span much of the career of the last of the great polymaths. As usual in an essay collection, there are dead spots, but Gardner writes with lively, accessible prose that can really tickle when it's on the mark. Volledige review lezen

Inhoudsopgave

Fearful Symmetry
xvii
The Twin Paradox
7
Quantum Weirdness
16
The Computer as Scientist
26
WAP SAP PAP and FAP
34
Infinity and Information
44
Can Time Stop? The Past Change?
53
Werner Heisenberg
62
Coleridge and the Ancient Mariner
291
Lewis Carroll and His Alice Books
312
The Royal Historian of Oz
322
Georges Perec
342
Puzzles in Ulysses
348
Who Was Shakespeare
362
White Brown and Fractal Music
369
PHILOSOPHY
389

Superstrings
72
The Ultimate Turtle
86
SOCIAL SCIENCE
97
Why I Am Not a Smithian
99
The Laffer Curve
121
HG Wells in Russia
134
Beyond Cultural Relativism
143
Klingon and Other Artificial Languages
156
PSEUDOSCIENCE
165
Pseudoscience in the Nineteenth Century
167
The Irrelevance of Conan Doyle
177
Wilhelm Reich and the Orgone
187
Freud Fliess and Emmas Nose
201
William James and Mrs Piper
207
Close Encounters of the Third Kind
238
Mathematics
249
Mathematics and the Folkways
251
Mr Apollinax Visits New York
265
How Not to Talk About Mathematics
274
THE ARTS
289
The Significance of Nothing
391
Newcombs Paradox
406
Is Realism a Dirty Word?
415
The Mystery of Free Will
421
Computers near the Threshold?
436
The Curious Mind of Allan Bloom
444
Isaiah Berlin Fox or Hedgehog?
451
Why I Am Not a Pragmatist
458
Gardners Whys
475
The Popperism of Sir Karl
482
W V Quine
485
FortyThree The Irrelevance of Everything
489
RELIGION
501
The Strange Case of Robert Maynard Hutchins
503
The Wandering Jew and the Second Coming
519
Proofs of God
527
Surprise
545
INDEX
561
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
581
Copyright

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Over de auteur (1997)

Martin Gardner, born in 1914, is a regular reviewer for The New York Review of Books and was a Scientific American columnist for over twenty-five years. He lives in Hendersonville, North Carolina.

Bibliografische gegevens