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de use of, in addition to private
red to in the notes, acknowledg.
of the elder President Edwards, to
Fer for May 1836, and to several
70 have furnished many facts and
1. The statements, and even the

used whenever they were to the
at the entire work may not be un-
putation of the author; and that it
to the theological literature of our

VOLUME I

PAGE

1

5

Tue SALVATION OF ALL MEN STRICTLY EXAMINED. . .

CHAPTER I.
In which the fundamental principles of Dr. Chauncy's system con-

cerning future punishment are pointed out and compared with
each other. . . . . . . . .

.
CHAPTER IL
Whether the damned deserve any other punishment, than that which
is conducive to their personal good. . . . . .

CHAPTER III.
Whether the damned will, in fact, suffer any other punishment than

that which is conducive to their personal good. . . .

240

45

72

CHAPTER IV.
Containing an examination of Dr. C's arguments to prove endless
punishment inconsistent with justice. . . . . .

CHAPTER V.
Is annihilation the punishment of the damned? . . . .

CHAPTER VI.
The justice of endless punishment consisting in misery. . .

105

116

CHAPTER VII.
Containing another view of the question concerning the justice of
endless punishment. . . . . . . . .

CHAPTER VIII.
In which it is inquired, whether endless punishment be consistent
with the divine goodness. . . . . . . .

CHAPTER IX.
In which is considered Dr. C's argument from Rom. 5: 12, etc. :

119

142
CHAPTER X.
In which is considered Dr. C's argument from Romans 8: 19–24. 159

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CHAPTER XI.
Containing remarks on Dr. C's arguments from Col. 1: 19, 20. Eph. 1:
10, and 1 Tim. 2: 4.

· ·

. . . . . 179

CHAPTER XII.
Dr. C's arguments from Ps. 8: 5, 6. Heb. 2: 6–9. Phil. 2: 9, 10, 11, 1
Cor. 15: 24—29, and Rev. 5:13, considered. . . . . 192

CHAPTER XIII.
In which Dr. C's scheme is considered, with reference to his ideas of
huinan liberty and moral agency. . . . . . . 211

CHAPTER XIV.
A reply to Dr. C's answers to the arguments in favor of endless pun-

ishment, drawn from those texts which declare the punishment of
the damned to be everlasting, forever, forever and ever, and the fire
of hell to be unquenchable. . . . . . . . 218

CHAPTER XV.
In which are considered Dr. C's answers to the arguments drawn from

what is said concerning Judas, Mark 14: 21,- from the unpardon-
able sin, and from the tendency of the doctrine of universal sal-
vation to licentiousness. . . . . . . .

244
CHAPTER XVI.
In which some direct arguments are proposed, to prove the endless
punishment of the wicked.

. . . . . . .
Conclusion, . . . . . . . . . . 260
APPENDIX, containing remarks on several authors. . . . 263
Brief OBSERVATIOns on the doctrine of Universal Salvation. . 279

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249

.

A Dissertation CONCERNING LIBERTY AND Necessity. .

CHAPTER 1
Of natural and moral necessity and inability.

.

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CONTENTS.

CHAPTER X.
considered Dr. C's argument from Romans 8: 19–24. 159

CHAPTER XI.
emarks on Dr. C's arguments from Col. 1: 19, 20. Eph. 1: !
Tim. 2: 4. . . . . . . . . 179

CHAPTER XIL
ments from Ps. & 5, 6. Heb. 2: 6–9. Phil. 2: 9, 10, 11, 1
1 2 , and Rev. 5: 13, considered. . . . . 192

CHAPTER IV.
Of motives and their influence. . . . . . . . 342

CHAPTER V.
In which it is inquired whether volition be an effect and have a cause. 383

CHAPTER VI.
Of foreknowledge and the certainty or necessity implied in it. . 398

CHAPTER VII.
Objections considered. ·

·

CHAPTER VIII.
In which is considered the objection, that moral necessity implies

that God is the author of sin. . . . . . . . 439

Conclusion.

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OBSERVATIONS ON THE LANGUAGE OF THE MUHHEKANEE W INDIANS.

CHAPTER XIII.
C's scheme is considered, with reference to his ideas of
erty and moral agency. ·

· 211 |
CHAPTER XIV.
r. C's answers to the arguments in favor of endless puu-
rawn from those texts which declare the punishment of
d to be everlasting, forever, forever and ever, and the fire
le unquenchable. . . . . . . . 210

CHAPTER XV.
considered Dr. C's answers to the arguments drawn from
id concerning Judas, Mark 14: 21,~from the unpardon-
and from the tendency of the doctrine of universal sal-
jcentiousness. . . . . . . .

CHAPTER XVI.
je direct arguments are proposed, to prove the endless

. . . .

.
t of the wicked.

. . 249

Remarks ON THE IMPROVEMENTS MADE IN THEOLOGY BY HIS FATHER,

Pres. EDWARDS. . . . . . . . . . 481
THOUGHTS ON THE ATONEMENT. . . . . . . . 493
APPENDIX-Funeral Sermon, by Rev. Robert Smith. .

:

:

244

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ntaining remarks on sereral authors. . .
Fations on the doctrine of Universal Salvation.

310

CON CONCERNING Liberty and Necessity. .

CHAPTER I
I moral necessity and inability. .. .

CHAPTER II.
. . . . . . . . . .

32

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CHAPTER MI.

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MEMOIR.

It is a thought of the profound and striking Pascal, * “ that there are three very different orbits in which great men move and shine.” There are those who as heroes aim successfully at military renown. The world is filled with the story of their exploits; they are hailed by the plaudits of the multitude, honored when living, and eulogized and remembered when dead. Their fame, however, is, in reality, of the lowest grade ; for it is written in the sufferings and blood of their fellow men. Their memory shall last, comparatively, but a little while ; or if they are remembered, it will be, in proportion as just views prevail, with disapprobation, and possibly with execration—like the incendiary of Diana's temple, “whose name has been transferred from oblivion to infamy.” They have woven their garlands from human sufferings, and it may be that every leaf is to scorch and burn their names, and their memories, as with living fire !

A second class is higher in the scale. It consists of those who by splendor of imagination, or vigor of intellect, attain to a more quiet and a purer fame ;-a fame, indeed, which is appreciated by comparatively few, and yet which shall never die. But a third, and a far higher class than either of the former, includes those, whose lofty intellects have been consecrated to the service of their great Author ;—who have employed their talents in the elucidation and defence of divine truth, in opposing error, in blessing their fellow-men, and in honoring God. Their names and memories will ever glow with the richest and noblest lustre. Instead of being dimmed, they shall grow brighter and brighter with the lapse of ages, down to the end of time; till at last they

* As quoted in the life of Henry Martyn.

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