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Sermon V. Preached July 20, 1775, being on the

first American Fast, recommended by Congress, 112

Sermon VI. Preached May 3, 1781; on the Re-

commendation of Congress,

127

A THANKSGIVING SERMON.

Sermon VII. Preached December 13, 1781, being

a day set apart by Congress for a General

Thanksgiving,

141

SEVEN MILITARY SERMONS.

© Sermon VIII. Preached April 5, 1757, at the re-

quest of Brigadier-General Stanwix, to the Sol-

diers under his command, previous to their

march, after Braddock's Defeat, to suppress the

Ravages of the French and Indians, on our Fron.

tier Settlements,

155

Sermon IX. Preached in the great Hall of the

College of Philadelphia, April 10, 1768, as

Chaplain pro tempore, appointed by Colonel

Wilkins, to the XVIIIth, or Royal Regiment of

Ireland; on the Christian Soldier's Military Duty, 179

Sarmon X. Preached May 1, 1768, on the same

occasion, and in the same place,

190

rmon XI. Preached May 8, 1768, in the same

place, to said Regiment; to which was added,

the celebrated Speech of a Creek Indian, against

the immoderate use of Spiritous Liquors, 201

mon XII. The Christian Soldier's Spiritual

Duty, June, 1768,

225

Sermon XIII. On the same subject, being the last,

or farewel to the said Regiment,—then under

marching orders,

235

Sermon XIV. Preached June 23, 1775, on the

then alarming situation of American affairs; at

the request of Colonel Cadwalader, and the

Oncers of the third Battalion of Volunteer-Mili.

tia of the City of Philadelphia. Present also

the Members of Congress.

To which is pre-

fixed a large and interesting Preface,

251

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containing the Fundamental Laws, Calculations

concerning Annuities, and an abstract of Pro.

ceedings, &c.

385

Sermon XX. Preached April 6, 1795 ; as an in-

troduction to a plan for the Establishment and

Encouragement of Itinerant Preachers, or Mis-

sionaries, on the Frontier Settlements of the

United States; with a Supplement or Second

Part stating and warning against the abominable

tenets of the ILLUMINATI, and the doctrines of

the New Philosophy,

444

TWO GENERAL CONVENTION SERMONS.

Sermon XXI. Preached June 23, 1784, at Anna-

polis, Maryland, at the first General Convention

of the Episcopal Clergy in that State, assisted

by Lay Representatives,

483

Sermon XXII. Preached October 7, 1785, at the

request of, and before, the General Convention

of the Bishops, Clergy and Laity of the Protes-

tant Episcopal Church ; on occasion of the first

introduction of the Liturgy and public Service of

the said Church, as altered and recommended

for future use in the United States of America, 524

A CONSECRATION SERMON.

Sermon XXIII. First preached September 17,

1792, in Trinity Church, New-York; before

the General Convention of the Bishops, Clergy,

and Laity of the Protestant Episcopal Church;

at the Consecration of Thomas John Clagget,

D. D. a3 Bishop Elect for the said Church, in

the State of Maryland. Preached in substance

also, at the two following Consecrations, viz. of

Robert Smith, D. D. for South-Carolina, Sep-

tember 13, 1795 ; Edward Bass, D. D. for

Massachusets and New-Hampshire, May, 1787.

Both in Christ Church, Philadelphia,

548

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IN THE HANDLING AND TREATING OF CIVIL, AS WELL AS RE

LIGIOUS, AFFAIRS.... AND MORE ESPECIALLY IN TIMES OF
PUBLIC DANGER, AND CALAMITY. *

MY DEAR SIR,

I HAVE carefully read the sermon that came enclosed to me in yours of the fifteenth instant; and cannot but think the subject well chosen, and highly seasonable. The thoughts you have chiefly dwelt on, are truly interesting; and their frequent intrusion shews a mind more deeply impressed with its sub.

• This letter was written on Braddock's defeat, in answer to one from the Reverend Thomas Barton, then exercising his ministerial office in the frontier counties of York and Cumberland, Pennsylvania, as missionary to "the venerable society in London, for propagating the gospel in foreign parts.".... The author intends both this letter, and the address to the colonies, which follows it, “On the opening of the campaign, 1758," as a kind of preface to the following Sermons on Special Public Occasions, and an apology, where it may be necessary, for the manner or expression, in any particular parts of them

VOL. II,

ject, than attentive to external niceties and method. But, for this very reason, perhaps, the sermon may be more generally useful to such readers as want to have the same truths set in various points of view; 60 that I have been very sparing in my proposed alterations of method. Some transpositions and abridgments I have, however, offered to your consideration, agreeably to the confidence you are pleased to repose in me.

There is, if we could hit upon it in composition, a certain incommunicable art of making one part rise gracefully out of another; which, although it is to be seen by a critic only, will yet be felt and tasted by all. To please in this respect is well worth our warmest endeavours. We are debtors alike to the wise, and the unwise; the learned Greek, and the foolish Barbarian. None but a few choicer spirits, have sense and goodness enough, to be captivated by the naked charm of Religion. Vulgar souls need to be roused from the lethargy of low desire, and to have their love of God and goodness, excited and enflamed. Hence, Religion must be taught, as it were, to breathe and to move before them, in all the grace and majesty of her most winning and attractive form.

We shall, therefore, err greatly, if we flatter ourselves that it will cost us less labour to preach or write to the ignorant, than to the intelligent. To please and profit the latter, requires sense only. To please and profit the former, requires sense and art both.

I am obliged to you for your kind expressions towards me. An intercourse of compliment would ill suit the seriousness of our characters; and, in re

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