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Inhoudsopgave

I
5
II
19
III
38
IV
49
V
64
VI
76
VII
91
VIII
104
IX
122
X
134
XI
153
XII
167
XIII
178
XIV
193
XV
209
XVI
225

Overige edities - Alles weergeven

Veelvoorkomende woorden en zinsdelen

Populaire passages

Pagina 17 - Mr. Boz, and Dr. Johnson." She read one of the conversations between Rasselas and Imlac, in a high-pitched majestic voice ; and when she had ended, she said, " I imagine I am now justified in my preference of Dr. Johnson as a writer of fiction.
Pagina 12 - ... and it was said she thought of trying a bath of oil. This remedy, perhaps, was recommended by some one of the number whose advice she asked ; but the proposal, if ever it was made, was knocked on the head by Captain Brown's decided " Get her a flannel waistcoat and flannel drawers, ma'am, if you wish to keep her alive. But my advice is, kill the poor creature at once.
Pagina 55 - He strode along, either wholly forgetting my existence, or soothed into silence by his pipe — and yet it was not silence exactly. He walked before me with a stooping gait, his hands clasped behind him; and, as some tree or cloud, or glimpse of distant upland pastures, struck him, he quoted poetry to himself, saying it out loud in a grand, sonorous voice, with just the emphasis that true feeling and appreciation give. We came upon an old cedar-tree, which stood at one end of the house — "The cedar...
Pagina 56 - No more did I — an old fool that I am ! — till this young man comes and tells me. Black as ash-buds in March. And I've lived all my life in the country ; more shame for me not to know. Black : they are jet-black, madam.
Pagina 56 - Hall, and had a comfortable nap, unobserved, till he ended; when the cessation of his "voice wakened her up, and she said, feeling that something was expected, and that Miss Pole was counting 'What a pretty book!' Pretty, madam! it's beautiful! Pretty, indeed!
Pagina 65 - They were usually brought in with tea ; but we only burnt one at a time. As we lived in constant preparation for a friend who might come in any evening (but who never did), it required some contrivance to keep our two candles of the same length, ready to be lighted, and to look as if we burnt two always. The candles took it in turns ; and, whatever we might be talking about or doing, Miss Matty's eyes were habitually fixed upon the candle, ready to jump up and extinguish it and to light the other...
Pagina 51 - Altogether, I never met with a man, before or since, who had spent so long a life in a secluded and not impressive country, with ever-increasing delight in the daily and yearly change of season and beauty. When he and I went in, we found that dinner was nearly ready in the kitchen — for so I suppose the room ought to be called, as there were oak dressers and cupboards all round, all over by the side of the fireplace, and only a small Turkey carpet in the middle of the flag-floor.
Pagina 10 - Captain, and had obtained some situation on a neighbouring railroad, which had been vehemently petitioned against by the little town; and if, in addition to his masculine gender, and his connection with the obnoxious railroad, he was so brazen as to talk of being poor — why, then, indeed, he must be sent to Coventry. Death was as true and as common as poverty; yet people never spoke about that, loud out in the streets. It was a word not to be mentioned to ears polite. We had tacitly agreed to ignore...
Pagina 43 - When oranges came in, a curious proceeding was gone through. Miss Jenkyns did not like to cut the fruit; for, as she observed, the juice all ran out nobody knew where; sucking (only I think she used some more recondite word) was in fact the only way of enjoying oranges; but then there was the unpleasant association with a ceremony frequently gone through by little babies ; and so, after dessert, in orange season, Miss Jenkyns and Miss Matty used to rise -up, possess themselves each of an orange in...
Pagina 50 - June day — for it was June now. He named that he had also invited his cousin, Miss Pole; so that we might join in a fly, which could be put up at his house. I expected Miss Matty to jump at this invitation; but, no! Miss Pole and I had the greatest difficulty in persuading her to go. She thought it was improper; and was even half annoyed when we utterly ignored the idea of any impropriety in her going with two other ladies to see her old lover. Then came a more serious difficulty. She did not think...

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