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INDEX TO VOL. II.

SECOND SERIES.

Address to the Queen .

218
Ambrose, B., Hymn by

615
America and the American Church 318
American Episcopal Church . 451
Appeal for National Society

641
Aristophanes, Metrical Translation
of the Frogs of

38
Articles and Liturgy

393
Assurance, Church of England
Life, &c.

221

Confirmations

617
Connaught, Tour in

51
Country Life, Sketches of

602
Courvoisier, last hours of

432
Current Sense of the Church, 28, 31, 98

.

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Baptism, Dr. Pusey on, &c. 639
Beloved Wife, Exequy on

27
Bellarmine's Notes of the Church
Examined

76, 199
Binney, Mr., and Clerical Confor-
mity

381
Biography

436, 484, 593
Bishops, new

617
Books, Dialogue on

129
Both One in Christ

49
Brief Hist. Notices of the Church
of England

6, 120
Bull, Rt. Rev. Bishop, Life of 484
Cambridge

53, 107, 165
Cambridge Hymns

50
Cambridge Society for National
Education

44
Cardwell on Church Ornaments

268
Catalogue of Dean Rennell's Li-
brary

549
Catechetical Commentary

545
Catholic Truths

604
Chalmers, Dr., and the Veto.

586
Chillingham Wild Cattle
Christ, a Life of, 206, 407, 463,518, 574

628
Christian Instructor 296, 355, 477
Church of England the Catholic
Church in England

266
Church the Gift of the Saviour 267
Church of England, Notices of
the

6, 120
Church of the People

651
Church in Scotland, Address to the
Queen

218
Church in Scotland

564, 620
Churches Building and Consecrated

506, 563, 619, 675
Church Extension

152
Cleansing the Sanctuary, 372, 496, 559

610, 660
Clergy Reserves

244
Clergymen, Testimonials to

55
Clerical Tonsure .

159
Colonial Bishops

393
Colonial Church

19, 151
Comber's Friendly Advice to Ro-
man Catholics

28

157

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Ken's, Bishop, Manual

269
King's, Archbishop, Exequy

27
King's College

46, 326, 508
Kirk of Scotland

194, 273
Knox's Liturgy

296
Leslie, Rev. Charles, Life of Rt.
Rev. Bishop

98, 136

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Reformation, Progress of at St. An-

diews 397, 453, 509, 565, 621
Rennell, Very Rev. Dean

549
Reserves, Clergy

214
Reviews,' 48, 104, 164, 257, 293, 296
381, 384, 444, 498, 539, 545, 549

550, 601, 602, 604, 609, 610
Ribbonism

417
Roman Catholics in England and
Wales

380
Roman Fallacies:

604
Romish Review, and Mr. Perceval 361

Mant, Bishop, on Popish Music 219
Marriage, Queen's

150
Marsh, Bishop, on Ceremonies 31
Maynooth Petition

97
Memorial on Church Discipline Bill 216
Milan, and Names of Bishops of : 550
Millennium and Archbishop Usher

290, 364, 473
Miscellaneous, 112, 168, 280, 324, 332

393, 451, 507
Missions

272
Modern Missions

215
Mortality, Bills of

: 561, 616, 672
National Education 43, 44, 160
National Education in Ireland 351
Natural Theology 1, 57, 113, 169
Norrisian Prize Essay .

104
Notices, Historical

6, 120
Notes and Reflections

207

Old Paths

264
Ordinations 54, 108, 166, 277, 391

447, 503, 561, 616
Original Sin and Justification
Ornaments, Church

268
Ornithology

378
Oxford

107, 165

Sacred Poetry from the Elder
Writers

325
Sacrifice the Divine Service. 498
Sage, Rt. Rev. Bishop

593
Sanctuary, Cleansing of, 372, 496, 556

610, 660
Schoolmasters' Society

620
Servant Girl in London

610
Sharp, Abp., Life and Times of, 355, 477
Sherlock on Religious Assemblies. 601
Scottish Episcopal Church Society 12

396, 507
Scotland, Present State of Esta-
blishment

225
Scotland, Kirk of

194
Scotland, Kirk of, Public Opinion 273
Signs of the Times

551, 660
Sinclair, Rev. John

641
Sins, Ministerial

Remission or
Retention of

529
Skua Gulls of Shetland

378
Socialism

138, 177, 213
Society for Propagation of the Gos-
pel in Foreign Parts .

507
St. Bartholomew, Massacre of 61
St. Paul's Altar

645
Statistical Tables for E. and W. 502

341

: 361, 655

Penance

432
Perceval, Hon. and Rev.
Pinckard on the Eucharist

92
Poor Child of Erin

25
Popery, Chartism, and Socialism 138
Popes of Rome, History of . 539
Popish Inquisition

147
Popish Orders, Revival of

102
Prayers for the Dead .

531
Predestination, Doctrine of

98
Preferments, 54, 110, 167, 223, 278, 331

391, 449, 504, 562, 617, 673
Presbyterianism, Difficulties of, 376, 423
Presbyterian Ordination

669
Proper Lessons

152, 234
Protestant Association .

95
Protestants, Persecution of, in Na.
ples

395
Puritanism and its Effects

81

Testimonials of Respect to Clergy-
men.

55, 224, 279, 331, 392
The Seven Sacraments

308
The Reviewer Reviewed

321
Things in General

220, 276
Tradition

247, 491

University Intelligence, 32, 107, 165,450,

673
Usher, Archbishop, on Millennium 290

364, 473

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Rating of Tithes .
Reading Books for Schools
Rebaptizing
Red Sea, Passage of

395

Well's Rich Man's Duty
Widow and her Son
Wild Cattle

270

52
491
396

95
157

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In our last number we expressed a strong doubt as to the utility of works on Natural Theology, written with a view of convincing the sceptic, and thought that they must needs fail of execting the end desired. This led to some observations on the reasoning faculty, and on its subserviency to passion in all matters which nearly concern our hopes and fears. The opinion expressed may to some appear exaggerated, but we think that it derives support from observation and experience. At all events it deserves farther consideration. Two men are discussing a question, and they employ the same premises, but come to different conclusions. How shall we explain the discrepancy? Is it that the reasoning faculty acts differently in the two cases ;-that it pursues a different path in advancing from the premises to the conclusion ? Is it not rather that each disputant, before he enters the lists, determines to win the battle ; and to fight for victory, not for truth? Or take a case in which a point is argued affecting the interests of two parties. The premises are the same, but the conclusions opposite. The parties interested can come to no decision : to whom do they refer the solution of the difficulty ? To one who has no interest in the question under discussion ; that is to say, to one whose reason can act without bias, and pursue its natural and consistent course, neither distorted by passion nor bribed by self-interest.

A serious, and oftentimes a fatal error arises from confounding the excesses of passion with the defects of reason. Madness, for instance, is said to be a malady of the reason, and men wonder much to find madmen reason well from premises partly correct and partly incorrect;—correct when the subject is one remote from the halucination which possesses them, but incorrect when the halucination supplies the materials for thought. Now the process of reason is the same in both cases : it signifies not whether the premises are true or false; they fully warrant the conclusion. We do not now speak of cases of fatuity, produced by severe injury to the head, or sudden shock to the mind, when all its faculties are at once overthrown; but of madness in the more ordinary acceptation of the term. Now we contend that in the majority of cases of madness the reasoning faculty is intact, and that in all its strange wanderings it is made

VOL. I.

B

the slave of the predominant passion, or of the ruling idea, in the same way, though in a much greater degree, than in those whom we call sane. There are many cases of madness, indeed, in which reason asserts her rights, and gives ample proof that she is not the willing instrument of passion. We remember a case in point which made a strong impression on our own mind. A poor woman had long been remarkable among

her neighbours for her affectionate care of her family, and for her sober and orderly conduct; after a severe illness the idea entered her mind, and ultimately gained the entire mastery over it, that her husband no longer loved her as he had done; she became jealous, and her jealousy increased day by day, in spite of every attention and every protestation. Her husband and her children were neglected. At length she heard voices whispering in her ear, and calling her names, and she said that these voices were her husband's. When her reason was directly appealed to,when the question was put whether her husband was near her when she heard the voices which she stated to be his, she at once saw the dilemma in which she was placed, and burst into tears; and this occurred as often as a strong appeal was made to the reasoning faculty. In the stronger sex the same appeal excites ungovernable rage, or ends in unintelligible ravings. And to these same expedients does passion have recourse in the sane. Tears are a woman's refuge, rage a man's, and both are blended in the child. The above is but one of many illustrations that might be given in support of the view we have taken, that the reason of the madman is merely enslaved, but not destroyed.

It has been said that all men are mad, and that there is no one who does not depart more or less widely from the rule of reason, and the dictates of prudence. Though this opinion can scarcely be received as true, it is in the highest degree probable that madness in its most marked form is nothing more than an exaggeration of that state of mind which leads in the sane to errors of reason and of action ;-that the reason of the madman is the slave of passion or of fancy, whilst the reason of the sane is merely their servant. The reason of the madman cannot emancipate itself from bondage, but the reason of the sane is free to leave the service of its masters. In the madman the will is paralyzed; in the man of sane mind the will remains, though it be exercised with difficulty. Madmen yield to their passion or their fancy without an attempt at resistance; the sane can struggle for freedom, and bring other faculties of the mind to their aid against that which would enslave it. We hear of a moral insanity : what is this but reason become the slave of passion ? We know of an intellectual insanity : what is this but reason become the slave of fancy? There is a religious insanity: what is this but reason enslaved by conscience ? For conscience, though less liable to err than other instinct of the mind, has, nevertheless, its excesses, and sometimes attains a sensitiveness so acute as to constitute a disease.

How closely the condition of the sceptic and the infidel border on that of the madman, God only knows. How fearfully dangerous the state of that man is who, whether by sins of omission or commission, gives too much power to thoughts, and too much force to habits, opposed to the belief in a religion which promises reward and threatens punishment, it requires no super human penetration to discover. No one knows how soon the habit of doing wrong may end in the impossibility of thinking aright; nor to what extent a train of thought may be safely indulged, and how often

any

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