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UNIVERSITY INTELLIGENCE.

TRINITY COLLEGE, M.DCCC.XXXVI.

On Trinity Monday, the following gen- Richard Wrightson ; Edmund Matlemen were elected to be Fellows of turin; William Roberts; Edmund MeTrinity College :-John Toleken, A.B. redith ; John Jellet ; James Lawson ; Thomas M'Neece, A.B.; and Charles Patrick Murphy; Cornelius Ring ; Graves, A.B.

Maurice O'Donohue. The first premium of £260 was awarded to William Atwell, A.B.; and On Saturday, June 25th, Isaac Butt, premiums of £45 each to Richard LL.B. was elected by the Provost and Trayer, A.B.; and Robert Mooney, Senior Fellows, to be Whately ProA.M.

fessor of Political Economy, in the The following gentlemen were elect- room of Dr. Longfield, resigned. The ed to be Scholars of Trinity College: examination was held on the 13th of John Hallowell; Michael Roberts ; April.

TRINITY TERM EXAMINATIONS.

N.B.— The names of the successful Candidates in each rank are arranged, not in order of merit, but in the order of standing on the College Books.

SENIOR SOPHISTERS.

George. Second Rank- Mr. Rynd, J. G. HONOURS IN SCIENCE.- Second Rank. Mr. Story, Joseph; Mr. Bushe, Richard Morgan, Lewis; Hussey, Malachy; Chi Henry; Lendrick, James; Feinagle, chester, Robert.

Charles; Salmon, George; Gwynne, HONOURS IN CLASSICS.–First Rank. James; Sharkey, Lewis G.; Black, Wyley, William. Second Rank-Henn, William Faussett; Peebles, Robert BenThomas.

jamin ; Clibborn, John ; Moore, PonsonJUNIOR SOPHISTERS.

by; Richardson, John; Murphy, JereHonours IN SCIENCE.First Rank. miah ; Dobbyn, Thomas. Mr. Kelly, Charles; Burke, Henry;

JUNIOR FRESHMEN. Connor, Henry; Flanagan Stephen. HONOURS IN SCIENCE.First Rank. Second RankMr. Massy, John B.; Mr. Forde, Thomas ; Mr. Morris, ArWarren, Robert; Ovens, Edward ; Sauna thur; Kirkpatrick, William ; Richards, ders, Thomas; Ellis, Conyngham ; Doyle, John Henry; Lee, George; Gaggin, John.

John ; Hume Abraham. Second Rank. HONOURS IN CLASSICS.-First Rank. Mr. Ryder, Michael Wood; Wilson, Walters, John Francis; Perrin, John; Hugh; North, Roger; Studdart, George; Mills, Richard ; Ahern, William. Se Edge, John; Corcoran, Michael E. ; cond Rank- Mr. Torrens, Thomas F.; Smith, Henry; Boyce, James W. ; Le Mr. Wise, James L. ; Mr. Vance, An Marchant, Robert ; Bagot, Edward ; drew; Tibbs, Henry ; Newman, William; Morris, Richard; Basset, William. Miller, William; Littledale, John.

HonourS IN Classics.-- First Rank. SENION FRESHMEN.

Mr. Ryder, Michael W. ; Mr. Kinahan, HONOURS IN SCIENCE.- First Rank Daniel ; Mr. Hayman, Samuel ; StackMr. Blood, William ; Lendrick, James; poole, William C.; Bickmore, Charles ; White, Matthew ; Salmon, George ; Porter, William; Power, Cuthbert ColM-Gillicuddy, Francis, Galbraith, Joseph. lingwood; Ralph, Charleton Stewart ; Second Rank.-Dobbs, Conway; Ruther Smith, James. Second Rank- Mr. ford Archibald ; Rutherford Henry ; Stannus, Thomas Robert ; Mr. Foster, Moore, Richard, Longfield, George ; John V.; Hamilton, James; Basset, Gabbett, Robert.

William ; Lee, George ; Walker, John ; HONOURS IN CLASSICS_First Rank. Halpin, Nicholas Jolin; Bagot, Ed. Mr. Cairns, Hugh M.Calmont; Flanagan, ward; Gaggin, John; Smith, George; John ; Byrne, James; M.Gillicuddy, Magee William ; Riordan, Patrick; BickFrancis; Loughlin, John William; Long- more, Frederick A.; King, Francis ; field, George; Law, Hugh; Graham Cangley, David

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HOLBERG'S PETER PAARS
I FIORELLI ITALIANI.-No. VIII.
A MOONLIGHT MEDITATION
CONSTANTINOPLE DURING THE GREEK AND TURKISH REVOLUTIONS
REMARKS UPON THE WRITING ON THE SECOND SET OF TABLES OF

THE COVENANT, (CONTAINED IN A REPLY TO THE STRICTURES OF AN ANONY.
MOUS CRITIC,) BY DR. WALL, S.F.T.C. AND PROFESSOR OF Hebrew IN THE UNI.
VERSITY OF DUBLIN

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BOTANY OF IRELAND

ALISON'S FRENCH REVOLUTION

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The proceedings of the two houses of do what we can to separate the disparliament, in reference to the Irish cussion from every irritating topic municipal reform bill, present a subject that might call into action the passions for consideration far too important to of the partizan. be passed over in silence.

It is a

We shall first endeavour to state subject upon which a great deal of fairly the circumstances of that difdeclamation has been very uselessly ference between the houses of parliaemployed ; and with which a great ment, which some men fondly call deal of party feeling has been very “ the collision;" and the demands unfortunately mixed up. We feel which, upon the grounds of this difsatisfied that, if men could be brought ference have been very violently to consider the questions these pro- made. ceedings involve, with the calmness The Commons passed a bill by and sobriety which their importance which all existing corporations were demands; if they could abstract the abolished ; and by which, in addition principles of those questions from the to this, new bodies were constituted disturbing influence of the appeals that and invested by statute, with some of have been made to passion, and submit the rights and privileges which had them to the ordeal of plain and sober been conferred by royal charter upon common sense, they would infallibly the abrogated corporations ; the House arrive at the conclusion that all the vio- of Lords acceded to the first portion lence and indignation that have been of the bill, by which existing corporamanifested, have been utterly and tions were abolished, but refused their miserably misplaced, and that the assent to the establishment of any new advocates of collision and reform of bodies in their stead.

After some the Lords, have not the shadow of a attempts at a compromise, the matter rational pretext for the course of tur- ended in the bill being altogether bulence which it appears to be their rejected by the Commons. intention to pursue.

Upon these proceedings a demand In the remarks which we mean to is made by a section of the radical offer upon this subject, we shall party, that the House of Lords should address ourselves to men of all parties. be reformed ; that is, that some meaIn the belief which we have stated, sure should be adopted by which the that much may be effected by an second branch of the legislature may appeal to the common sense of the be brought into a general accordance rational portion of the community, with the wishes of the third. under whatever political denomination Our readers will perceive that in they may be found, we shall endeavour this two questions are presented to our to reason without any reference to the notice — first, the particular question contests of party difference. It is as to the Irish corporations, and then too much to expect that we shall arising out of this, the great constitusucceed in persuading men to view tional question of reform of the Lords this matter in the coolness of an --that is, we have first to consider unprejudiced judgment, but we shall whether the incorporation of the Vol. VIII.

L. 2

sure

bodies proposed by the Commons, take for granted what a very little would be really an advantage to the reflection might shew them to be country; and after this a second without foundation. Now, it certainly question is forced upon our notice ; is not an axiom that needs no proof, whether the refusal of the Lords that the proposed corporations would to sanction this measure furnishes a be a benefit to the country; and yet, sufficient cause for forming a certain we cannot recollect a single attempt organic change in the constitution, that has been made by the advocates including, of course, in this second, of their institution, to exhibit a single the practicability and the general good that can result from it. We are effects of that change.

aware that this plain business-like way We have already discussed at some of dealing with a question is unfashionlength the provisions of the Irish able in this country ; it is uusuited to municipal reform bill. We do not the taste of our people ; it is much intend to enter again upon the full easier to raise the cry of “justice to consideration of a question which Ireland !” than to prove that that cry perhaps is long since exhausted ; but has any meaning ; it is less troublethere are a few considerations which some to follow that cry than to exawe throw out for Irishmen of all mine the practical bearings of a meacreeds and parties to reflect on before But we are rather inclined to they determine whether the bill, as sent adhere to our own method, and put in up from the Commons, was, in the every case, the question —" What present state of this country, calcu good will it do?" Now, we put this lated to promote the prosperity of question in the spirit of candour and Ireland or the happiness of her people.

fairness. The ministerial measure has To determine upon the expediency many able, and we sincerely believe of any political measure, we have honest advocates at the Irish press. generally to strike a balance between Let the writers in the columns of the its probable advantages and disadvan- Register, the Freeman, or the Evening tages, and be guided by the result. Post, who have done so much to excite Let any candid man pursue this method the passions of the inflammable porof calculation, with respect to the tion of the Irish people, just pause for establishment of the new corporations; a moment to satisfy the obstinate and first let him calmly reflect upon wrongheadedness of the few matter-ofthe practical and substantial good that fact Irishmen, like ourselves, who he may reasonably expect to follow have taken up the English prejudice of from their creation. If it can be thinking it necessary to have a reason shewn that the comforts of our popu- for everything. There is perhaps no lation will be increased — that their public journal which has displayed happiness will be augmented—that our more knowledge of the economical industry will be encouraged, our la- statistics of Ireland, than some years bouring classes better fed or better ago the Morning Register, in the able clothed, or the resources of Ireland articles in which it advocated repeal. developed ; we will admit that, for the Now let that journal apply some of sake of these objects, the measure should this knowledge to the questions before earnestly and strenuously be sought us—let it be shewn how the establishafter ; nay more, if we can be convin ment of the new corporations will proced that any such results are likely to mote the prosperity of our common follow from it, we will become its country, and then, and not till then, warmest advocates ourselves. But, until we will admit that it is fair and right it is proved that some advantages will in our opponents, to stamp us as secresult from the adoption of a measure, tarian and antinational, because we are not ready to consent to it refuse to assent to their institution. merely because it may please some

We do not think that in this depersons to call it a benefit to Ireland. mand we ask anything that common

We are anxious to urge this point sense does not bear us out in. We strongly upon the attention of those bave heard much of “insult,” and who honestly support this measure, “ injustice,” and “ arrogant peers ;" but because we know that, in the excite all this amounts to no proof.

The ment of party feeling, men are apt to denial of corporations is a national

we

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