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TRANSLATIONS.

(THE following are a few only of Campbell's Translations from the Greek; they were writion at the age of sixteen, during his collegiate career, and their beauty and elegance went far to win for him the notice and friendship of the Professors.)

MARTIAL ELEGY.

FROM THE GREEK OF TYRTÆUS.

How glorious fall the valiant, sword in hand,
In front of battle for their native land !
But oh! what ills await the wretch that yields,
A recreant outcast from his country's fields !
The mother whom he loves shall quit her home,
An aged father at his side shall roam ;
His little ones shall weeping with him go,
And a young wife participate his woe;
While scorn’d and scowld upon by every face,
They pine for food, and beg from place to place.

Stain of his breed ! dishonouring manhood's

form, All ills shall cleave to him :Affliction's storm Shall blind him wandering in the vale of years, Till, lost to all but ignominious fears,

He shall not blush to leave a recreant's name,
And children, like himself, inured to shame.

But we will combat for our fathers' land, And we will drain the life-blood where we stand, To save our children :-fight ye side by side, And serried close, ye men of youthful pride, Disdaining fear, and deeming light the cost Of life itself in glorious battle lost.

Leave not our sires to stem the unequal fight, Whose limbs are nerved no more with buoyant

might;
Nor, lagging backward, let the younger breast
Permit the man of age (a sight unbless’d)
To welter in the combat's foremost thrust,
His hoary head dishevelld in the dust,
And venerable bosom bleeding bare.

But youth's fair form, though fallen, is ever fair, And beautiful in death the boy appears, The hero boy, that dies .in blooming years : In man's regret he lives, and woman's tears, More sacred than in life, and lovelier far, For having perish'd in the front of war.

SONG OF HYBRIAS THE CRETAN.

My wealth 's a burly spear and brand,
And a right good shield of hides untann'd,

Which on my arm I buckle:
With these I plough, I reap, I sow,
With these I make the sweet vintage flow,

And all around me truckle.

But your wights that take no pride to wield
A massy spear and well-made shield,

Nor joy to draw the sword:
Oh, I bring those heartless, hapless drones,
Down in a trice on their marrow-bones,

To call me King and Lord.

FRAGMENT.

FROM THE GREEK OF ALCMAN.

The mountain summits sleep: glens, cliffs, and

caves

Are silent--all the black earth’s reptile brood

The bees--the wild beasts of the mountain wood: In depths beneath the dark red ocean's waves Its monsters rest, whilst wrapt in bower and spray

[the day. Each bird is hush'd that stretch'd its pinions to

SPECIMENS OF TRANSLATIONS FROM

MEDEA.

Σκαιούς δε λέγων, κουδέν τι σοφούς
Τους πρόσθε βρoτους ουκ άν άμαρτους. .

Medea, v. 194, p. 33, Glasg. edito

Tell me, ye bards, whose skill sublime
First charm’d the ear of youthful Time,
With numbers wrapt in heavenly fire,
Who bade delighted Echo swell
The trembling transports of the lyre,
The murmur of the shell
Why to the burst of Joy alone
Accords sweet Music's soothing tone?
Why can no bard, with magic strain,
In slumbers steep the heart of pain ?
While varied tones obey your sweep,
The mild, the plaintive, and the deep,
Bends not despairing Grief to hear
Your golden lute, with ravish'd ear?
Has all your art no power to bind
The fiercer pangs that shake the mind,
And lull the wrath at whose command
Murder bares her

hand ?
When flush'd with joy, the rosy throng
Weave the light dance, ye swell the song!
Cease, ye vain warblers ! cease to charm!
The breast with other raptures warm !
Cease! till your hand with magic strain
In slumbers steep the heart of pain!

gory

SPEECH OF THE CHORUS,

IN THE SAME TRAGEDY,

TO DISSUADE MEDEA FROM HER PURPOSE OF PUTTING HER

CHILDREN TO DEATH, AND FLYING FOR

PROTECTION TO ATHENS.

O HAGGARD queen! to Athens dost thou guide

Thy glowing chariot, steep'd in kindred gore; Or seek to hide thy foul infanticide

Where Peace and Mercy dwell for evermore!

The land where Truth, pure, precious, and sublime,

Woos the deep silence of sequester'd bowers, And warriors, matchless since the first of time, Rear their bright banners o'er unconquer'd

towers !

Where joyous youth, to Music's mellow strain,

Twines in the dance with nymphs for ever fair, While Spring eternal on the lilied plain,

Waves amber radiance through the fields of air!

The tuneful Nine (so sacred legends tell) [among

First waked their heavenly lyre these scenes Still in your greenwood bowers they love to dwell;

Still in your vales they swell the choral song !

But there the tuneful, chaste, Pierian fair,

The guardian nymphs of green Parnassus, now Sprung from Harmonia, while her graceful hair

Waved in high auburn o'er here polish'd brow!

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