Antonio’s Devils: Writers of the Jewish Enlightenment and the Birth of Modern Hebrew and Yiddish Literature

Voorkant
Stanford University Press, 2 jun. 2004 - 368 pagina's
Antonio's Devils deals both historically and theoretically with the origins of modern Hebrew and Yiddish literature by tracing the progress of a few remarkable writers who, for various reasons and in various ways, cited Scripture for their own purpose, as Antonio's "devil," Shylock, does in The Merchant of Venice.

By examining the work of key figures in the early history of Jewish literature through the prism of their allusions to classical Jewish texts, the book focuses attention on the magnificent and highly complex strategies the maskilim employed to achieve their polemical and ideological goals. Dauber uses this methodology to examine foundational texts by some of the Jewish Enlightenment's most interesting and important authors, reaching new and often surprising conclusions.

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Geselecteerde pagina's

Inhoudsopgave

Prussia
101
Galicia
207
Coda
311
Bibliography
319
Index
343
Copyright

Overige edities - Alles weergeven

Veelvoorkomende woorden en zinsdelen

Populaire passages

Pagina 64 - It is literature that produces an active solidarity in spite of skepticism; and if the writer is in the margins or completely outside his or her fragile community, this situation allows the writer all the more the possibility to express another possible community and to forge the means for another consciousness and another sensibility.
Pagina 22 - do a great right, do a little wrong”: “It must not be, there is no power in Venice can alter a decree established
Pagina 9 - The Excellent History of the Merchant of Venice. With the extreme cruelty of Shylock the lew towards the saide Merchant, in cutting a iust pound of his flesh
Pagina 61 - constitutes. . . a sense of absolute because experienced reality beyond which it is very difficult for most members of the society to move, in most areas of their lives

Over de auteur (2004)

Jeremy Asher Dauber is the Atran Assistant Professor of Yiddish Language, Literature, and Culture at Columbia University.

Bibliografische gegevens