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Shone like a meteor streaming to the wind,
With gems and golden lustre rich imblaz’d,
Seraphic arms and trophies; all the while
Sonorous metal blowing martial sounds:
At which the universal host up sent

A shout, that tore Hell's concave, and beyond - Frighted the reign of Chaos and old Night.

All in a moment through the gloom were seen · Ten thousand banners rise into the air

With orient colors waving: with them rose

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unfurls; as also of that ghastly With orient colors waving : with light, by which the fiends appear them rose to one another in their place of A foreft huge of spears;] So Tasso torments: the shout of the whole describing the Christian and Pagan host of fallen Angels when drawn Armies preparing to engage, Cant, up in battel array: the review 20. St. 28. which the leader makes of his infernal army: the Aash of light Sparse al vento on deggiando ir le which appear'd upon the drawing

bandiere, of their swords: the sudden pro- E ventolar su i gran cimier le duction of the Pandemonium: and penne: the artificial illuminations made Habiti, fregi, imprese, arme, e in it. Addison.

colori,

D'oro, e di ferro al sol, lampi, e 543. Frighted the reign of Chaos fulgori. and old Night.] Reign is used

29. like the Latin regnum for kingdom: Sembra d'alberi densi alta foresta

and so in Spenser's Fairy Queen, Lun campo, e l'altro, di tant' • B. 2. Cant. 7. St. 21.

haste abonda. That ftrait did lead to Pluto's grilly

28.

Y Loose in the wind waved their en. reign.

signs light, 545. Ten thousand banners rise ina Trembled the plumes that on their to the air

crests were set;

Thei

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A forest huge of spears; and thronging helms
Appear'd, and serried shields in thick array
Of depth immeasurable: anon they move
In perfect phalanx to the Dorian mood 550
Of Autes and soft recorders; such as rais'd
To highth of noblest temper heroes old
Arming to battel, and instead of rage
Deliberate valor breath'd, firm and unmov'd.
With dread of death to flight or foul retreat; 555
Nor wanting pow'r to mitigate and swage
With solemn touches troubled thoughts, and chase
Anguilh and doubt and fear and sorrow' and pain
From mortal or immortal minds. Thus they
Breathing united force with fixed thought 560

Mov'd

Their arms, impresses, colors, gold 550.— to the Dorian mood &c.] and stone,

All accounts of the music of the Gainst the sun beams smil'd, fla- Ancients are very uncertain and med, sparkled, shone. confus'd. There seem to have been 29.

three principal modes or measures Of dry topt oaks they seem'd two

among them, the Lydian, the Phryforests thick;

gian, and the Dorian. The Lydian So did each host with spears and

was the most doleful, the Phrygian pikes abound.

4 the most sprightly, and the Dorian Fairfax. the most grave and majestic. And

I byer. Milton in another part of his works 548. --- ferried shields] Lock'd uses grave and Doric almoft as synone within another, link'd and onymous terms. « If we think clasp'd together, from the French “ to regulate printing, thereby to ferrer, to lock, to Mut close. “ rectify manners, we must regu

Hume, “ late all recreations and pastimes,

Mov'd on in silence to soft pipes, that charm'd
Their painful steps o'er the burnt foil; and now
Advanc'd in view they stand, a horrid front
Of dreadful length and dazling arms, in guise
Of warriors old with order'd spear and Thield 565
Awaiting what command their mighty chief
Had to impose : He through the armed files
Darts his experienc'd eye, and soon traverse
The whole battalion views, their order due,
Their visages and stature as of Gods,
Their number last he sums. And now his heart
Diftends with pride, and hard’ning in his strength
Glories : for never since created man,
Met such imbodied force, as nam'd with these

Could

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« all that is delightful to man, pets and other martial music in.: « No music must be heard, no song cited and inflam'd them more to

“ be set or sung, but what is grave rage. See Aulus Gellius, Lib. I. 3and Doric." (See his Speech for cap. 11. and Thucyd. L. 5. .

the liberty of unlicenc'd Printing. = Vol. I. p. 149. Edit. 1738.) This 560. Breathing united force with

therefore was the measure best fixed thought e adapted to the fall’n Angels at this Mou'd on in filence] Thus Homer - jundture: and their instruments were makes the Grecians march on in · Autes and pipes and soft recorders, for filence breathing force, Iliad. III. 8.

the same reason that Thucydides and other ancient historians affign

Οι δ' αρ ισαν σιγη μωσα σνμον. : for the Lacedemonians making use

τις Αχαιοί, -5 of these instruments, because they

Ey guluw 4.7.d. inspir'd them with a more cool and 567. - He through the armed file: - deliberate courage, whereas trum Darts his experienc'd eye, -] No:

NA

unliko dels ; dels; or whom Biferta, formerly cannot agree with Dr. Bentley in call'd Utica, fent prom Afric fore, rejecting some of these lines as that is the Saracens who pass'd fpurious, yet it is much to be wish'd from Biserta in Africa to Spain, that our poet had not so far inwhen Charlemain with all his peer. dulged his taste for romances, of age fell by Font arabbia, Charlemain which he professes himself to have king of France and emperor of been fond in his younger years, Germany about the year 800 un- and had not been oftentatious of dertook a war against the Saracens such reading, as perhaps had better in Spain, and Mariana and the never have been read. Spanish historians are Milton's au- 589. — he above the rest &c. ) thors for saying that he and his What a noble description is here of army were routed in this manner at Satan's person! and how different Fontarabbia ( which is a strong from the common and ridiculous town in Biscay at the very en- representations of him, with horns trance into Spain, and esteem'd and a tail and cloven feet! and the key of the kingdom): but yet Tasso hath so describ'd him, Mezeray and the French writers Cant. IV. The greatest masters give a quite different and more pro- in painting had not such sublime bable account of him, that he was ideas as Milton, and among all at last victorious over his enemies their Devils have drawn no porand died in peace. And tho' we trait comparable to this ; as every

Could merit more than that small infantry 575
Warr’d on by cranes ; though all the giant brood
Of Phlegra with th' heroic race were join'd
That fought at Thebes and Ilium, on each side
Mix'd with auxiliar Gods; and what resounds
In fable or romance of Uther's son
Birgirt with British and Armoric knights ;
And all who since, baptiz’d or infidel,
Jousted in Aspramont or Montalban,
Damasco, or Marocco, or Trebisond,
Or whom Biserta sent from Afric shore, 585

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When

unlike that in Shakespear, Anth. fide the heroes were assisted by the & Cleop. A& I...

Gods, therefore call'd auxiliar Gods; - those his goodly eyes

and what resounds even in fable or That o'er the files and musters of

of romance of Uther's fon, king Arthur,

son of Uther Pendragon, whose the war Have glow'd like plated Mars.

exploits are romanticly extolla by

Geoffry of Monmouth, begirt with 575. -- that finall infantry British and Armoric knights, for he · Warr'd on by cranes ;] All the he- was often in alliance with the king roes and armies that ever were as- of Armorica, since called Bretagne, sembled were no more than pyg- of the Britons who settled there; mies in comparison with these An- and all who fince jousted in Aspragels; though all the giant brood of mont or Montalban, romantic names Phlegra, a city of Macedonia, of places mention'd in Orlando Fuwhere the giants fought with the rioso, the latter perhaps Montau. Gods, with th' heroic race were ban in France, Damasco or Marocco, join'd that fought at Thebes, a ciry Damascus or Morocco, but he calls in Bæotia, famous for the war be- them as they are call'd in romances, tween the sons of Edipus, cele- or Trebifond, a city of Cappadocia brated by Statius in his Thebaid, in the lesser Asia, all these places and Ilium made ftill more famous are famous in romances, for jout. by Homer's Iliad, where on each ings between the baptiz'd and info

When Charlemain with all his peerage fell
By Fontarabbia. Thus far these beyond
Compare of mortal prowess, yet observ'd
Their dread commander: he above the rest
In shape and gesture proudly eminent
Stood like a tow'r; his form had yet not lost
All her original brightness, nor appear’d
Less than Arch-Angel ruin’d, and th’excess
Of glory' obscur’d; as when the sun new risen
Looks through the horizontal misty air
Shorn of his beams, or from behind the moon

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