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And to disorder'd rage let loose the reins,
With mountains as with weapons arm’d, which makes
Wild work in Heav'n, and dangerous to the main.
Two days are therefore past, the third is thine ;
For thee I have ordain'd it, and thus far 700

Have fuffer'd, that the glory may be thine
· Of ending this great war, fince none but Thou

Can end it. Into thee such virtue’ and grace
Immense I have transfus'd, that all may know
In Heav'n and Hell thy pow'r above compare; 705
And this perverse commotion govern'd thus,
To manifest thee worthiest to be Heir
Of all things, to be Heir and to be King
By sacred unction, thy deserved right.
Go then thou Mightiest in thy Father's might, 710
Ascend my chariot, guide the rapid wheels
That shake Heav'n's basis, bring forth all my war,

My the giants war with the Gods. And 710. Go then thou Mightiesi &c.] when war hath thus ferformi'a'what The following lines in that glowar can do, he rises still higher, rious commission, which is given and the Son of God is sent forth the Mefian to extirpate the hoit in the majesty of the almighty Fa- of rebui Angels, are drawn from ther, agreeably to Scripture ; fo a sublime pallage in the Pfalins. much doth the subliinity of holy The reader will easily discover Writ transcend all that is true, many other firokes of the same na: and all that is feign'd in descrip- ture.

Adatke, tion,

The

720

My bow and thunder, my almighty arms
Gird on, and sword upon thy puissant thigh;
Pursue these fons of darkness, drive them out 715
From all Heav’n’s bounds into the utter deep:
There let them learn, as likes them, to despise
God and Messiah his anointed king.

He said, and on his Son with rays direct
Shone full; he all his father full express’d
Ineffably into his face receiv’d;
And thus the filial Godhead answ'ring spake.

O Father; O Supreme of heav'nly Thrones, First, Highest, Holiest, Best, thou always seek'st To glorify thy Son, I always thee,

725 As is most just; this I my glory' account, My exaltation, and my whole delight, That thou in me well pleas'd, declar’st thy will Fulfill’d, which to fulfil is all my bliss.

Scepter

The Psalm here meant is the XLVth, be improv'd by reading and pointver. 3. & 4. Gird tby sword upon ing the whole pasiage thus, tby thigh, 0 most mighty, with thy glory and thy majefty: and in thy man - bring forth all my war, jefty ride prosperously &c.

My bow and thunder, my al714. — and sword upon thy pu

mighty arms; iffant thigh;] A great man And gird my sword upon thy pu. observed to me, that the sentence issant thigh. falls in this place, and that it may

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732. Thou

Scepter and pow'r, thy giving, I assume, 730
And gladlier shall resign, when in the end
Thou shalt be all in all, and I in thee
For ever, and in me all whom thou lov'ft:
But whom thou hat'st, I hate, and can put on
Thy terrors, as I put thy mildness on, 735
Image of thee in all things; and shall soon,
Arm'd with thy might, rid Heav'n of these rebell's,
To their prepar'd ill mansion driven down,
To chains of darkness, and th' undying worm,
That from thy just obedience could revolt, 740

Whom

732. Thou shalt be all in all, &c.) they all may be one, as then Farber We may still observe that Milton art in me, and I in tbee, ibat obey generally makes the divine Persons also may be one in us. ver. 21. ling talk in the stile and language of them, and thou in me, that tbey may Scripture. This passage is mani. be made perfect in one, and that the festly taken from 1 Cor. XV. 24 world may know that thou bast loved and 28. Then cometh the end when them, as thou haft loved me. ver. 23. he fall have delivered up the king. And when it is added dom to God: And when all things fall be fubdued unto him, then shall But whom thou hat'it, I hate, the Son also himself be subject unto him that put all things under him, is not this an allufion to Plal. that God may be all in all. And CXXXIX. 21. Do not I hate thos, immediately afterwards when it is O Lord, that hate thee, &c? And faid

there are several other instances, La I in thee

which the pious reader will perhaps For ever, and in me all whom be better pleas'd to recolle&t him. thou lov'st:

self, than to have them pointed

out to him. this is plainly in allusion to feveral expressions in John XVII. kat737.-rid Hear'n of obese rebell

Whom to obey is happiness entire.
Then shall thy Saints unmix’d, and from th’impure
Far separate, circling thy holy mount
Unfeigned Halleluiahs to thee fing,
Hymns of high praise, and I among them chief. 745

So faid, he o'er his seepter bowing, rose
From the right hand of glory where he fat;
And the third facred morn began to shine,
Dawning through Heav'n: forth ruth'd with whirl-
: wind found
The chariot of paternal Deity,

750 Flashing

Of these rebellious, of these who religious grandeur, which throws have rebell’d; a remarkable ex- the advantage on the side of the pression.

English poet. Thycr. 746. So said, he o'er his scepter 749. forth rub'd with whirl.

bowing, rafe &c.] The de wind found &c.] Miiton has scription of the Meffiah's going out raised his description in this book against the rebel Angels is a scene with many images taken out of of the same sort with Hesiod's Ju- the poetical parts of Scriptura, piter against the Titans. They The Messiah's chariot is formed are both of them the moft un- upon a vision of Ezekiel, who, as doubted instances of the true sub Grotius observes, has very much lime; but which has exceeded it is in him of Homer's fpirit in the very difficult to determin. There poetical parts of his prophecy. is, I think, a greater profufion of

Addifon. poetical images in that of the latter; but then the superior charac- The whole description indeed is ter of a Christian Mefliah, which drawn almoft word for word from Milton has with great judgment Ezekiel, as the reader will see by and majesty supported in this part comparing them together. of his work, gives a certain air of

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o forth

Flashing thick flames, wheel within wheel undrawn,
Itself instinct with Spirit, but convoy'd
By four Cherubic shapes; four faces each
Had wondrous; as with stars their bodies all
And wings were set with eyes, with eyes the wheels
Of beril, and carreering fires between; 756
Over their heads a crystal firmament,
Whereon a faphir throne, inlaid with pure

Amber,

- forth rush'd with whirlwind

four faces each sound

Had wondrous; as with stars their The chariot of paternal Deity, bodies all | Flashing thick flames,

And wings were set with eyes, with

eyes the wheels And I looked, and behold, a whirlswind came out of the north, a great And every one had four faces. I. 6. cloud, and a fire infolding itself, I. 4. And their whole body, and their Or perhaps the author here drew wings, and the wheels were full of Isaiah likewise to his assistance, Isa. eyes round about, X. 12. LXVI. 15. For behold the Lord will * come with fire, and with his chariots

the wheels like a whirlwind.

Of beril, and carreering fires be

tween ; — wheel within wheel undrawn, Itself instinct with Spirit, but con

The beril is a precious stone of a voy'd

sea-green color, and carreering fores By four Cherubic shapes; are lightnings darting out by fits,

a metaphor taken from the run. Also out of the midst thereof came the ning in tilts ; The appearance of the likeness of four living creatures, and wheels and their work was like vero their appearance was as it were a the color of a beril; and the fire was wheel in the middle of a wheel; and bright, and out of the fire went foreb when the living creatures went, the lightning. I. 16, 13. wheels went by them, for the spirit of the living creature was in the Over their heads a crystal firmawheels. I: 5, 16, 19, 20,

ment,

Whereon

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