Divers Voyages Touching the Discovery of America and the Islands Adjacent

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Hakluyt Society, 1850 - 177 pages
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Page xxi - Governments, and Warres of the INDIANS. Published in Latin by Mr. Hakluyt, and translated into English by M. Lok., Gent.
Page li - In the second is set out his second voyage, with the adventures and accidents thereof. In the thirde is declared the strange fortunes which hapned in the third voyage, with a severall description of the countrey and the people there inhabiting. With a particular card thereunto adjoyned of meta incognita, so farre forth as the secretes of the voyage may permit.
Page v - I found lying open upon his boord certeine bookes of cosmographie with an universall mappe : he seeing me somewhat curious in the view thereof, began to instruct my ignorance by shewing me the division of the earth into three parts after the olde account, and then according to the latter and better distribution into more.
Page vi - Which words of the Prophet together with my cousins discourse (things of high and rare delight to my yong nature) tooke in me so deepe an impression, that I constantly resolved, if ever I were preferred to the University, where better time, and more convenient place might be ministred for these studies, I would by Gods assistance prosecute that knowledge and kinde of literature, the doores whereof (after a sort) were so happily opened before me.
Page lxxxvii - ... to discover, search, find out, and view such remote, heathen, and barbarous lands, countries, and territories, not actually possessed of any Christian prince, nor inhabited by Christian people...
Page xxxiv - Westminster, to whom England is more indebted for its American possessions than to any man of that age.
Page lxxxvii - The colleagues of the fellowship for the discovery of the north-west passage.
Page 150 - Description of a Voyage made by certaine Ships of Holland into the East Indies, with their Aduentures and Successe ; together with the Description of the Countries, Townes and Inhabitantes of the same : who set forth on the second of April, 1595, and returned on the 14 of August, 1597. Translated out of Dutch into English by WP (William Phillip).
Page xxiii - English navigation | round about the whole globe of the earth. | .By Richard Hakluyt, master of artes and student sometime | of Christchurch in Oxford. | Imprinted at London by George Bishop) and Ralph Newberie, Deputies to | Christopher Barker, Printer to the | Queenes most excellent Maiestie | 1589.
Page vi - English languages, and in my publike lectures was the first, that produced and shewed both the olde imperfectly composed, and the new lately reformed Mappes, Globes, Spheares, and other instruments of this Art for demonstration in the common schooles, to the singular pleasure, and generall contentment of my auditory.

À propos de l'auteur (1850)

Born in Herfordshire, English geographer and clergyman Richard Hakluyt devoted much of his life to preserving the records of all English voyages of discovery and promoting the advantages of exploring and settling North America. While still a schoolboy, Hakluyt visited the law offices of his cousin and saw a large display of geographical materials. He immediately became fascinated with geography. In time he pursued this interest at Oxford University, where later he lectured on geography. Hakluyt was also ordained in the ministry, which enabled him to earn a living while indulging his passion for geography. In 1582 Hakluyt published the first of his four major works, Divers Voyages Touching the Discovery of America and the Islands Adjacent. This work was, in part, propaganda for the English explorer Sir Humphrey Gilbert's doomed voyage to America the following year. Hakluyt next wrote an outline for colonial policy in America, stating some of the advantages of settlement and who should go. Ironically, this work, The Discourse of Western Planting, was not published until 1877. Nonetheless, Hakluyt was instrumental in reviving interest in the settlement of Virginia after the disappearance of the ill-fated Roanoke colony. He was one of the petitioners for the Virginia Company's 1606 grant that resulted in the Jamestown settlement. He also helped plan the East India Company, which colonized India. Hakluyt's best-known work, Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, first appeared in 1589, with a second edition published in 1599 and 1600. In 1846, the Hakluyt Society was founded, and it still continues today to publish narratives of early explorations, perpetuating his labors as well as his memory.

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