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CHAPTER VI.

oners, an annexe of the Old Bailey, filled subject. They shook their heads and re. and emptied before and after the sessions. fused to commit themselves. But this Considerable sums were expended in re. was exactly what Pat Torrance did. He constructing the interior and providing was so satisfied that here at last he had the largest possible number of separate got everything he wanted, that he discells for the confinement of the limited played his decision in Carry's favor from number of prisoners who now required to the first day. He made a spectacle of be accommodated. With the establish- himself to the whole county, looking on ment of the prison, in harmony with the with the keenest attention; and oh, how most approved and advanced ideas, this pleased society would have been in the retrospective glance at the varied history district had he been once for all made an of the old place of durance naturally ends. example of, made a fool of, as they said, ARTHUR GRIFFITHS. – held up to public scorn and ridicule as

a rejected suitor! As the wooing went on, the desire for such a consummation

- the anticipation of it - grew daily in

intensity; and it was not very long doubtFrom Blackwood's Magazine.

ful. One of the usual great balis was THE LADIES LINDORES.

given at Tinto, which was specially in

honor of the new-comers, and took place ALAS! it was not very long before as soon as they were out of their mourneverybody knew. The demeanor of Pat ing. It was evidently a crisis in the life Torrance at the dinner, to which Lady of the master of the house, and to the Lindores had been so reluctant to ask greater part of the guests all the interest him, gave much occasion for thought to of a highly exciting drama was mingled the other guests who knew the man and with the milder impulses of amusement. his ways. These said to each other that Lady Caroline, everybody said, had never Pat had put his foot in it at last — that he looked less well. She was very pale; it had made his choice, and thrown his was even said that freckles, caused by her bandkerchief at almost the only woman in sinful exposure of her face to all the ele. the county, who was not sure to respond ments during the summer, diminished the to it. Nothing could have been colder or sheen of her ordinarily white forehead more repellent than Lady Caroline was to her nose was longer than ever. But all this great matrimonial prize — the idol this only increased, to her admirer, the wliom they all bowed down to, though charm of her presence. She was indepensome with minds which rebelled against dent of beauty. Though she was very the rude and ungodlike divinity. Among simply dressed too simply for a lady of these interested lookers-on were some rank — yet the air with which she moved who rejoiced to see that he was likely to about these fine rooms was (Pat thought) be made “to see his place" and submit such as no one else who had ever been to the humiliation of refusal; and some there had possessed. She was superior to who, conscious that in their own families them, as she was superior to the lilies and there were worshippers who would not the roses, the wreathed smiles and shin. have refused to bow down, were angry ing eyes of the other girls. He followed with poor Carry for setting up” to be so her about with demonstrations of devomuch better than her neighbors. The tion which no one could mistake. He most sagacious of these, however, re-would have danced with nobody but her, served their judgment. There was some in the most marked abandonment of all thing in the demonstration with which his duties as host, would she have perthe earl brought Pat forward and patted mitted him. Even when he danced with him on the back — something, too, of pain others his eyes followed her, and the only in poor Lady Carry's mild eyes, which talk he vouchsafed to his partners was made these more profound observers about Lady Car, as he called ber, with pause. The Lindores were poor. There offensive familiarity and a sort of intoxi. were two daughters to provide for; and cation. As for poor Lady Caroline herit was not a matter to be settled so easily, self, it was apparent to every one that she or which the parents would allow to turn retreated continually into out-of-the-way entirely on a young girl's fancy. And corners — hiding herself behind the old then she was not even pretty, and she maids and dowagers, who were never left had got into the twenties — not a mere out of such gatherings, and liked to come girl, with all the world before her. The and look on and criticise the girls, and wise would not give any opinion on the tell how things had been done in their

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day. Several of these old ladies, dis- displeasure in the mind of Lady Lin. tressed to see a girl not dancing, had be dores; but he was gone before she could trayed poor Carry's hiding-place by their say anything. “ What is the matter?” kind efforts to get her a partner ; and the she said, taking her daughter's hand. result had been two or three times that “Rouse yourself, Carry; everybody is she was thus delivered over into the very staring. What has happened? clutches of the wolf.

nothing, nothing! Oh, mamma, let us go “ Mr. Patrick," one of those kind ladies home," the poor girl cried. Her lips, her said, rising from her seat and taking hold very eyelids trembled. She looked as if of his arm as he prowled about, wonder. she were about to faint. Lady Lindores ing where Carry could have disappeared was glad to see her husband approaching; to,“ do you no think it's discreditable to but he too had a threatening and stern the county that a young leddy'newly come look. She called him to her, and begged among us, and a person of rank — and, him to ask for the carriage. Carry is what is better, a sweet young creature quite ill,” she said. “If you will stay should be left sitting down the whole with Edith, I can send it back for you; night and get no dancing ?”

but

poor Car has looked like a ghost all It was on this occasion that Miss Bar- night.”. “ She has looked much more bara Erskine won the heart of the perse like a fool - as she is," said her father, cuted girl. She said to her in a strong between his set teeth; but at last he conwhisper which went through Carry's ear sented that she should be taken home, like a - skewer (the simile is undignified, seeing the state of collapse in which she but suits the fact): “My dear, there's was. He took her down-stairs, supportthat eеdiot, Jean Sempill, drawing atten. ing her on his arm, which was necessary, tion to you. If you want to get out of the as she could scarcely walk; Lut when way, slip away behind me; there's a door they skirted the dance, in which the mas. there that leads into the corridor, and so ter of the house was performing, talking you can get back to your mother. Stay loudly and laughing with forced merriby your mother - that's your safest way. ment all the time, the earl, though he was Thús Carry was delivered for the mo- a well-bred man, could not help giving his ment. But, alas! her mother could not daughter's arm a sharp pressure, which protect her effectually. When Pat Tor- hurt her. “I might have known you rance came boldly up with his dark face would behave like a fool,” he said in a glowing, and his projecting eyes ready, as low undertone, which nobody but Carry å spectator remarked, to jump out of his could hear. She wavered for a moment, head, and said, “ This is our dance,” what like a young tree in the wind, but clung to could any one do for her? Lady Lindores him and hurried past replying, nothing. had become alarmed, not knowing what to Lady Lindores following, formed her own make of Carry's agitation; but even a conclusions, though she did not hear what mother in these circumstances can do so her husband said. She took her child little. “I am afraid she is tired, Mr. into her arms when they were safe in the Torrance," Lady Lindores said; but carriage, rolling along the dark roads in Carry's arm was already in his. She had the dimness of the summer night, and not presence of mind even to take the Carry cried and sobbed on her mother's advantage of such an excuse.

breast. “I understand that you have When he brought her back, however, refused him,” Lady Lindores said. to her mother's side, nobody could have what then? Why should you be so helped seeing that something had hap- wretched about it, Carry? It is a kind of pened. Poor Carry was as white as hier | vanity to be so sorry for the man. You dress: she seemed scarcely able to hold may be sure Mr. Torrance will get over herself upright, and sank down by herit, iny love.” mother's side as if she neither saw nor Then Carry managed to stammer forth heard anything that was going on round the real source of her terror. She was her. On the other hand, Pat Torrance not thinking of Mr. Torrance, but of was crimson, his eyes were rolling in his papa. What would he say to her ? would head. He said almost roughly, “You he ever forgive her? And then it was were right, Lady Lindores. Lady Car is Lady Lindores's turn to be amazed. tired; but I make no doubt she will be " My darling, you must compose your. herself again to.morrow.” It was a curi- self,” she said, “this is greater nonsense ous speech to make, and there was a tone than the other. Papa! What can it mat. of threatening and anger in his somewhat ter to your father? He will never force elevated voice which roused the liveliest I your inclinations; and how can this coarse

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bumpkin interest such a man as he is ?" he had been, oh, mother, do you think I She became almost angry at the sight of could forget Edward ?" she said. His Carry's tears. “ Allow me to know your name had not been mentioned between father a little better than you do," she them for months before. cried. “Mr. Torrance! who is Mr. Tor- “ Edward,” said Lady Lindores, shakrance? I can't believe that he would favor ing her head; and then she kissed the such a suitor for a moment. But sup- pleading, expectant face, which she could posing that he did so, — supposing he only feel, not see. “ He should ha thought, as people are apt to do, that showed more energy, Carry. Had he money covers a multitude of sios — your been worthy of you, he would not have left father is not a worldly-minded man, Car- this question unsettled till now." ry, he is ambitious, but not for money, What could he do?” cried Carry, supposing just for the sake of argument roused out of her prostration; "he could

Anyhow, my dear, that could only not invent business for himself.” Again be if the man happened to please you in Lady Lindores shook her head; but by his own person.

We might like the match this time they had reached their own better because the pretender was rich, door, and in the fervor of her defence and nothing more. Can you really think that championship of her lover, Carry got out papa would be a tyrant to you, – that he of the carriage a very different creature would compel you to marry any one? | from the prostrate and fainting girl who Carry, my love, you have got an attack of had been put into it at Tinto. She went the nerves; it is your good sense that with her mother to her rooin, feverish and has given way.".

anxious to plead the cause of Edward. Carry wept abundantly while her moth- Lady Lindores was a romantic woman, er thus talked to her, and the agitation who believed in love, and had taught her which she had so long shut up in her children to do the same. But she was heart calmed down. Every word Lady disappointed that her daughter's lover had Lindores said was perfectly reasonable, not been inspired by his love ; that he had and to have represented her kind father not found success, and secured his own to herself as a domestic tyrant was mon cause beyond the power of evil fortune. strous, she felt; but yet – she could not Arguing against this adverse opinion, and tell her mother all the trifling, circum; defending Edward on every question, stances, the tones, the looks which had Carry recovered her courage and her comforced that conviction upon her. But she posure. She felt able to fight for him to was willing, very willing, to allow herself her last gasp when she left her mother, to be persuaded that it was all a mistake, shaking her head still, but always well and to accept the gentle reproof and ban- disposed to every generous plea; for the ter with which Lady Lindores soothed moment she had forgotten all the nearer her excitement. “To refuse a man is dangers which had seemed so terrible to always disagreeable," she said philosoph. her an hour before. ically, “especially as one must always feel Lady Lindores sat up in her dressing. one is to blame in letting him come the gown till her husband and Edith came length of a proposal, and self-esteem whis. back. He was very gloomy, she excited pers that he will find it hard to console and breathless, with a feverish sparkle in himself. No, my Carry, no; don't dis- her eyes, which her mother noticed for tress yourself too much. I don't want to the first time. She wondered if little be cynical; but men of Mr. Torrance's Edith was in the secret too - that secret type soon console themselves. Men have which she had herself scarcely thought of died and worms have eaten them, but not till to-night; and her husband's aspect for love."

filled her with strange anxieties. Was it “It is not that, it is not that,” Carry possible that she, who had known them protested among her tears.

so long, her husband for all the most imBut her mother would hear of nothing portant time of his life, her child since more alarming. “It is a wrong to your her first breath, should have discoveries father to think he would take up the cause to make in them now? The oug of such a man,” she said indignantly; painful to her, and she tried to dismiss it "and I should have been horribly disap- irom her mind. “Carry is better," she pointed in you, Carry, if you had thought said, with an attempt to treat the subject of him for a moment.”' Carry was so lightly. " It was the glare of those soothed, so comforted, so almost happy in rooms, I suppose. They are very hand. her trouble, that the inmost doors of her some, but there was too much heat and heart opened to her mother. “Whatever I too much light."

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“I hope it is the last time we shall have on which it had been her pride to keep any such scenes from Carry,” said the him for so many years. earl. “ You ought to speak to her very “That is all very well,” he said impaseriously. She has been behaving like a tiently; " but I never set myself up as a fool.”

model of what my children were to like. “Dear Robert,” said Lady Lindores, Yes; he has fine qualities, golden quali“it is trying to a girl of any feeling to ties. Do you know that he is the richest have a proposal made to her in a ball. commoner in Scotland, Lady Lindores ?room, and I dare

say

Mr. Torrance was "I know,” she said, with quick offence, rude and pressing. It is exactly what I the tears starting suddenly to her eyes, should have expected of him.”

" that my name is Mary, and that I hate “Since when,” said the earl sternly, this wretched title, which I shall never “have you studied Mr. Torrance so get used to, and never tolerate if my

husclosely as to divine what may be expected band calls me by it. We are all, all, put of him?"

asunder, all changed, and finding each • Robert! I have not studied him at other out since we came here.” all, nor do I attempt to divine. Carry's This little outburst was partly real, and agitation, her fright, her panic, if I may partly a half-conscious art to find an outcall it so

let for her excitement. Her husband was “ Were simply ridiculous, ridiculous !" more touched by it than if it had been cried Lord Lindores. “I always thought more serious. The complaint was fantas. her sentimental, but I never suspected tic, yet it was one which love might be her to be a fool.”

excused for making. “My love,” he said, Carry is no fool,” cried her mother “of course I meant nothing unkind. indignantly; " you know very well she There have been times when I called you has both spirit and sense, and more than Mrs. Lindores in jest, as I did just now.

She is not a common girl. She But, seriously, you must see what I am ought not to be treated as one. And thinking of - you must give me your supthis man, this fox-hunter, this vulgar port.

We are poor.

If Rintoul is to laird

take the position to which he is entitled “ As he will probably be your son-in-after me law, you will do well to avoid epithets," “ You mean Robin ? I tell you I hate Lord Lindores said.

those new names !" she cried. My son-in-law !” said his wife, in a “This is foolish, Mary: If he is to suppressed shriek. “But Carry has re-enter upon life when his time comes fused him," she added, with relief. weighted with a heavy provision for his

“ To-night – being furried, and not sisters - consider; there is poor Jane. knowing her own mind; but she will know She is quite young; she may outlive us better to-morrow.”

all: and if I were to die, there would be “Robert! for heaven's sake, when she two jointures besides Car and Edith.” has been so distressed by this most hate- “ Let me be struck off the list,” cried ful proposal, you surely will not suffer it Lady Lindores. “ I will never be a burto be repeated!”

den on my son. Robert, God forgive Why should it be a hateful pro- you; for a distant evil like this, would posal ?” he said.

you bring that man into our family, and Why?” Lady Lindores did not know force an unwilling marriage on your child? how to answer; if he did not see it, if it But no, no; I am doing you wrong; your did not jump at his eyes, as she said to thoughts have never gone so far." herself, what explanation would make it The earl made no reply.

His face was clearer? She tried to smile and approach like a thunder-cloud, lowering and heavy him on another side. “Dear Robert," - a darkness from which, at any moshe said tremulously —“to think of you ment, fire and flame might burst forth. taking the part of such a man! He must “No, no," said the mother. “I underhave some fine qualities, I am sure, or stand what you have thought. I did so you never could have endured the outside once myself when

- you remember of him, or his manners, or his talk. He young Ashestiel came in our way. I is so unlike you, so unlike anything the thought if they would but take to each girls have ever been taught to care for." other; if they would only see what a natIf this was flattery, surely it may be for- ural harmony they would make! Yes, given to the anxious mother. She was yes, I remember, I was provoked beyond anxious too, as a wife, that her husband measure that they would not see it; and should not come down from the pedestall when he went away, I did not know how

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myself. I was angry with my tried to speak, and her very voice failed innocent Carry for not caring. I under- her. What was the use of saying any. stand you, Robert. If by any chance her thing? If he thought thus, could anything fancy had been taken by this young mil. that was said affect him ? Despair iade lionaire; but, dear, how could it? You her incapable of effort. She was like would yourself have thought less of Carry Hamlet, paralyzed. At the end she'manhad she liked such a man. Acknowledge: aged to falter forth a word of protestation. he is not much better than a boor — with, “There are some,” she said faintly," who perhaps, a boor's virtues."

are content with so much less, Robert – She looked up when she had got so far, and yet how much more! and stopped in sheer amazement at the among the rest." sight of her husband's face. She had “A woman always answers with a pernever seen any indication before of what sonal example,” he said. she now found in it. Rage with difficulty And Lady Lindores was dumb. She smothered ; a determined intention to fol. did not know what to say to the new man low his own way; an uneasy shame turn- who stood beside her, in the familiar asing to bitterness and passion. His voice pect of her husband, expressing senti. was quite hoarse with the effort to con. ments which never before had come from tain himself. “ I thought,” he said, " that the lips of Robert Lindores. He had at least you were one of the silly been self-indulgent in the old days — perwomen who speak of things they don't haps a little selfish accepting sacrifices understand. But I was mistaken. You which it was not right for him to accept. will rather encourage a foolish girl in a But there had been a hundred excuses for piece of unworthy romance, than show him; and she and the girls had always her her duty her duty! But neither been so ready, so eager, to make those you nor she, by shall hold me up to sacrifices. It had been the pleasure of ridicule ! She shall take this husband I their lives to make his as smooth, as choose for her, or by Here he be graceful, as pleasant as possible. There came aware how much he was committing was no question of anything of this kind himself. He stopped, gazed at her de- now. He who had been dependent on fiantly for a moment, then began to pace their ministrations for half the comfort of up and down the room in great confusion. his life, was now quite independent of "The short and the long of it is,” he them, the master of everybody's fate, — said, “that I can't suffer Carry, for a judging for them, deciding for thein, girlish prejudice, to throw away such a crushing their private wishes. Lady Lin. position. He might be the first man in dores was confused beyond measure by the county," Lord Lindores said. “He this discovery. She put her hand to her has twice as much as we have, and no head unconsciously, as if it must be that title to keep up; no encumbrance of any which was wrong. A vague hope that kind. She might be a sort of princess. I things might not look so terrible in the cannot allow all this to be thrown away morning came into her mind. It was for a mere fancy. If she does not like very late, and they were all tired and him, she must learn to like him. What worn with the agitation of the evening. would she have? He is not a petit maître, “ I think I am not in a condition to uncertainly; but he is a man, every inch of derstand to-night,” she said drearily.... It him - bis family good, his health good, a will be better, perhaps, to put off till tomagnificent house; what could any woman morrow.” want more? She will have everything ?

" It is a pity you sat up,” he said that heart can desire."

coldly; and thus the strange conference Lady Lindores made no immediate re. ended. It was already morning, the blue ply. All this was so new to her a rev. light stealing in through the closed shutelation of things unthought of. It took ters. Things, as well as faces, look away her breath; it took away her cour. ghastly in this unaccustomed light. Lady age. Is there any shock, any pang that Lindores drew the curtains closer to shut life can give, equal to that of suddenly it out, and lay down with her head aching, perceiving a touch of baseness, a failure turning her face to the wall. There are of honor, a lower level of moral feeling, circumstances in which the light of heaven in those who are most dear to us? This is terrible; and darkness, darkness, obis what shatters heaven and earth, and livion of itself, the only things the soul shakes the pillars of existence to the be cares for. But though you can shut out holder. It filled this woman with a sud. the light, you cannot shut out thought. den despair impossible to describe. She | There was not much rest that nighi in

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