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There was antiently in our language a MINUTE of money, as well as a MINUTE of time; and its value was half a farthing.

“ Ihesu sittinge agens the tresorie bihelde hou “ the cumpany castide money in to the tresorie, “ and many riche men castiden manye thingis : “ sotheli whanne o pore widewe hadde come, she sente twey MYNUTIS, that is, a ferthing.

Mark xii. 42. Tpegen stýcas, Sat is, feorðung, Peninger.” “ Duo stycæ, id est, quadrans denarii.”

So that a FARTHING is also a participle, and means merely fourthing, or dividing into four parts.

And, as there was a MINUTE of money as well as a MINUTE of time; so was there also a FARTHING of land, as well as a FARTHING of money.

In our antient law books a farding-deale of land, means the fourth part of an acre. Whose rent was, in Richard the second's time, so restrained, that for a farding-deale of land they paid no more than one penny.

Walsingham, pag. 270. PROMISE, COMPROMISE, COMMITTEE, PREMISSES, REMISS, SURMISE, DEMISE, of mittere.

An EPISTLE, an APOSTLE, and a PORE of Επιστελλω, Αποστελλω and Πειρω.

Sect and INSECT of secare; as TOME and ATOM of Tejra.

Point (formerly poinct) of pungere.
PROMPT, EXEMPT of promere, eximere.
Rate of reor.
REMORSE, MORSEL of mordere.

ALLEY, ENTRY, MONSTER, MUSTER ( mostra ARMY (armata, armée,) JURY, JURAT, LEVY, LEVEE, ALLY, ALLIANCE, LIEGE and ALLEGEANCE ; as well as JUNTO, MANIFESTO, INCOGNITO, PUNTO, PROVISO, MEZZOTINTO, COMRADE ( Camerata ) FAVOURITE ( favorito ) and VISTA, declare themselves at first sight.

SO TRACT, EXTRACT, CONTRACT, ABSTRACT, TRACK, TRACE, TRAIT (formerly traict,) PORTRAIT (formerly pourtraict,) TREAT, TREATY, RETREAT, ESTREAT, are the participles of trahere and traire.

PULSE, IMPULSE, APPULSE, REPULSE of pellere. PRICE, PRIZE, CULPRIT, ENTERPRIZE, MAINPRIZE, REPRIZE, SURPRIZE, REPRIEVE, of prendre.

EVENT, CONVENT, ADVENT, VENUE, AVENUE, REVENUE, COVENANT, of venire and venir.

SAULT, ASSAULT, ASSAILANT, INSULT, RESULT, SOMERSET, of salire,

................ put his folke to flyght, And at a SAUTE he wan the cyte after.”

Knyghtes Tale. Soprasalto, called also salto mortale: i. e. fus vol" tando la persona sotto sopra senza toccar terra “ colle mani, o con altro.Della Crusca.) which the French have corrupted to soubresault, and the English to sumersault, somersalt, summersaut, and then to somerset.

“ What a SOMERSALT, 66 When the chair fel, she fetch'd with her heels upward.”

B. and Fletcher, Tamer tam'd. “ Here when the labouring fish doth at the foot arrive, « And find that by his strength but vainly he cloth strive,

.........

“ His tail takes in his teeth, and bending like a bow
" That's to the compass drawn, aloft himself doth throw:
“ Then springing at his height, as doth a little wand,
“ That bended end to end, and flirted from the hand,
" Far off itself doth cast, so doth the salmon vaut.
" And, if at first he fail, his second suMMERSAUT
“ He instantly assays."

Poly-olbion, song 6. “ Now I will only make him break his neck in doing a SOMERSET, and that's all the revenge I mean to take of him.”

B. and Fletcher, Fair Maid of the Inn. QUEST, INQUEST, REQUEST, CONQUEST, ACQUEST, EXQUISITE, REQUISITE, PERQUISITE, of quærere.

SUIT, SUTE, SUITE, PURSUIT, LAWSUIT, of suivre.

STRICT, DISTRICT, STRAIT, STREIGHTS, STREET, RESTRAINT, CONSTRAINT, of stringere.

TENT, INTENT, EXTENT, PORTENT, SUBTENSE, INTENSE, of tendere.

SUCCINCT, PRECINCT, of cingere.

VERSE, REVERSE, CONVERSE, UNIVERSE, TRAVERSE, AVERSE, ADVERSE, INVERSE, PERVERSE, TRANSVERSE, DIVERS, DIVERSE, CONVERT, of vertere.

BALLAD, BALLET, of ballare().

ACCESS, RECESS, EXCESS, PROCESS, SUCCESS, PRECEDENT, of cedere,

VIEW, REVIEW, INTERVIEW, COUNTERVIEW, PURVIEW, SURVEY, of voir.

COLLECT, ELECT, SELECT, INTELLECT, NEGLECT, of legere.

() “ Le BALLATE dette cosi, perche si cantavano a ballo."

Bembo. Volg. Ling. lib. 2, pag. 74, Edit. Venez. 1729.
Part II.

E

LASH (French lasche ) of a whip, i. e. that part of it which is let loose, let go, cast out, thrown out; the past participle of Fr. lascher, Ital. lasciare.

“ There was dayly pilled fro good men and “ honest, gret substaunce of goodes to be LASHED “ oute among unthriftes.”

Sir T. More. Rycharde the thirde, pag. 62.

To these may be added
Quit, QUITE, QUITTANCE.
Poise, (peser).
SPOUSE, RESPONSE.
EXPERT.
MERIT.
False, FAULT (fallito), DEFAULT.
Fruit (fruict).
RELIQUE, RELICT, DERELICT.
Vow, vote, DEVOUT.
Demur, (demeurer).
TALLY.

ASPECT, RESPECT, PROSPECT, CIRCUMSPECT, RETROSPECT.

SUSPENSE.
CORRECT, DIRECT, INSURGENT.

TENET, CONTENT, CONTENTS, CONTINENT, DETINUE (writ of), RETINUE.

CRUCIFIX, AFFIX, PREFIX.
DECREE, DISCREET, SECRET.
LAPSE, RELAPSE.

SCRIPT(*), MANUSCRIPT, RESCRIPT, PRESCRIPT, EXSCRIPT, TRANSCRIPT.

(5) “ Do you see this sonnet, this loving SCRIPT?”

B. and Fletcher, A Wife for Moneth.

CONSCRIPT, POSTSCRIPT, PROSCRIPT, NONDESCRIPT.

USE, MISUSE, DISUSE, A BUSE.

COURSE, DISCOURSE, CONCOURSE, RECOURSE, INTERCOURSE.

CONCEIT, DECEIT, RECEIPT, PRECEPT.
FINITE, INFINITE, DEFINITE, FINE.

Flux, AFFLUX, INFLUX, CONFLUX, SUPERFLUX, REFLUX.

SUBJECT, OBJECT, ABJECT, PROJECT, TRAJECT.

DEGREE, GRADUATE, INGRESS, REGRESS, EGRESS, PROGRESS.

LEGATE, DELEGATE, LEGACY.
INSTINCT, DISTINCT, EXTINCT.
ADVOCATE.
Visit.
CONVICT.
ABTRUSE.
INTRIGUE, INTRICATE.

TRANSIT, EXIT, CIRCUIT, ISSUE. (Fr. issir. Ital. escire Lat. exire.)

ROAST.
TOAST.

STATUTE, INSTITUTE, DESTITUTE, PROSTITUTE, SUBSTITUTE.

TINT, TAINT.
TEXT, CONTEXT, PRETEXT,
TRITE, CONTRITE,
Tact, CONTACT.
ТАСІт. .
ILLICIT,

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