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IMPRIMATUR.

COLL. DI. Jo. Bart. Maii 12mo, 1802,

MICHAEL MARLOW, VICE-CAN. OXON,

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TO THE

MOST NOBLE WILLIAM HENRY CAVENDISH,
DUKE OF PORTLAND,

LORD PRESIDENT OF HIS MAJESTY'S COUNCIL,
CHANCELLOR OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD;

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE LORD ELDON,
LORD. HIGH CHANCELLOR OF ENGLAND,

HIGH STEWARD OF THE UNIVERSITY;

AND TO*

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THE REVEREND MICHAEL MARLOW, D. D.

PRESIDENT OF ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE,

AND VICE-CHANCELLOR ;

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THE FOLLOWING WORK

THE OTHER RIGHT REVEREND AND REVEREND

THE HEADS AND GOVERNORS OF COLLEGES AND HALLS

IN OXFORD,

IS WITH THEIR PERMISSION RESPECTFULLY

INSCRIBED

BY THEIR OBEDIENT SERVANT,

THE AUTHOR.

વે

PREFACE.

THE following Work contains the fubftance of à Courfe of Lectures, which I have occafionally read to my pupils during the laft twelve years. The fatisfaction which they expreffed on hearing them has encouraged me to hope, that they will not prove unacceptable to thofe, for whofe ufe they are now made public.

To affert a claim to originality in fuch a work as this would perhaps only be equivalent to a confeffion of its demerit. My pretenfions to public regard muft depend in no fmall degree upon the manner in which I have clothed old ideas in a new drefs, and upon my fkill in compreffing within a moderate compass the fubftance of large and volu minous works. Upon all my fubjects I have endeavoured to reflect light from every quarter which my reading would afford. My references, and the books mentioned in my Appendix, will show the fources from which I have derived my principal information; but it would be almoft an endiefs, aud perhaps a very oftentatious task, to enumerate all my literary obligations.

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There are a few topics indeed, with refpect to which I think I may be allowed to affert fome claims to novelty. For many of my remarks on the Greek Language I am indebted principally to my own obfervations upon its nature and comparative merits; the Hiftory of Chivalry, important as the influence of that remarkable inftitution has been upon manners, is a fubject upon which I have not been able to collect much information from English Authors; and the Hiftory of the Revival of Claffical Learning, although a topic of the strongeft intereft to every man of letters, has never been fully treated by any writer, with whofe works I am acquainted.

Many of my Quotations are felected from fuch works, as, either from their fize, number of vo lumes, or fearcenefs, do not frequently come within the reach of young men. If fome of them are borrowed from more obvious and popular works, their peculiar beauty, ftrength, and appofitenefs, it is prefumed, will juftify their introduction. But elegant as my quotations may be in point of ftyle, conclufive as to reafoning, or ftriking as to the impreffion they are calculated to make; they will not completely anfwer the intended purpose, if, while they raise a high opinion of the merit of their authors, they do not excite an eager curiofity to perufe more of their works.

If I fhould be fortunate enough to fucceed in procuring for eminent writers any additional degree

of

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