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SENATE

74TH CONGRESS

18t Session

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REPORT No. 350

MAKING IT A CONTEMPT TO WILLFULLY FAIL TO

APPEAR AFTER HAVING BEEN ADMITTED TO BAIL

MARCH 13 (calendar day, MARCH 20), 1935.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. Logan, from the Committee on the Judiciary, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 17)

The Committee on the Judiciary, having had under consideration the bill (S. 17) making it a contempt to willfully fail to appear after having been admitted to bail, report the same favorably to the Senate and recommend that the bill do pass with the following amendments:

On page 1, line 3, after the word "bail” insert the words "prior to conviction”.

On page 1, line 4, after the word "commissioner" insert the words "or by any official designated in section 1014 of the Revised Statutes of the United States”.

On page 1, line 6, after the word "year" insert the words "or any person having been admitted to bail in any United States court after conviction".

On page 1, line 9, after the words "guilty of” strike out the words "a felony” and insert the word "contempt" in lieu thereof.

Amend the title so as to read: “Making it a contempt to willfully fail to appear after having been admitted to bail”.

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MARCH 13 (calendar day, MARCH 20), 1935.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. Logan, from the Committee on the Judiciary, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 18]

The Committee on the Judiciary, having had under consideration the bill (S. 18) to amend the Revised Statutes, section 1015, report the same favorably to the Senate and recommend that the bill do pass with the following amendments:

On page 2, line 3, after the word “accused”, insert the word “such”.

On page 2, line 3, after the word "refused.” strike out the words “Such bail may be taken by any of the persons authorized by the preceding section to arrest and imprison offenders.”

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MARCH 13 (calendar day, March 20), 1935.—Ordered to be printed

Mr. WHEELER, from the Committee on Indian Affairs, submitted the

following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 2145)

The Committee on Indian Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (S. 2145) providing for the extension of the time for repayment of the revolving fund for the benefit of the Crow Indians, Montana, having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it do pass without amendment.

This bill was introduced at the request of the Secretary of the Interior as set forth in his letter of March 2, 1935, a copy of which is appended hereto and made a part of this report as follows:

INTERIOR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, March 2, 1935. Hon. ELMER THOMAS,

Chairman Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: There is enclosed herewith copy of proposed legisation which would extend the date of repayment of the $50,000 Crow Indian tribal revolving fund which was established by the act of June 4, 1920 (41 Stat. L 755).

This act appropriated $50,000 of Crow tribal funds for a revolving fund to be used for the purchase of seed, animals, machinery, tools, implements, and other equipment for sale to individual members of the tribe under conditions to be prescribed by the Secretary of the Interior for its repayment to the tribe on or before June 30, 1925. By the act of March 4, 1925 (43 Stat. L. 1301), this fund was made available for an additional 10 years from and after June 30, 1925.

This fund has been of great benefit to the Crow Indians and has proved a material factor in their progress and welfare by providing individual Indians with the necessary equipment for the cultivation of their land. The money has been handled more or less in the nature of an Indian banking system, established because of the fact that the trust patent Indian cannot borrow from banks and use his land as security. Many of the Indians have taken advantage of this fund. The records show that up to June 30, 1934, $128,297.83 had been collected. This means that the original appropriation of $50,000 has been entirely paid back; the whole $50,000 again used, repaid, and partially used again. The balance outstanding on June 30, 1934. was $48,814.48.

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The continued use of the appropriation will be of great benefit to the Crow Indians in helping them to utilize their land. The Crow Tribal Council voted unanimously on October 22, 1934, for the proposed legislation continuing the fund for 10 years, beginning June 30, 1935.

I recommend that favorable action be taken upon the proposed legislation. Under date of February 7, the Acting Director of the Bureau of the Budget advises that the proposed legislation would not be in conflict with the financial program of the President. Sincerely yours,

HAROLD L. ICKES, Secretary of the Interior.

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ADD CERTAIN LANDS TO THESISKIYOU NATIONAL

FOREST IN THE STATE OF OREGON

MARCH 13 (calendar day, MARCH 21), 1935.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. McNARY, from the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 1513]

The Committee on Agriculture and Forestry, to whom was referred the bill (S. 1513) to add certain lands to the Siskiyou National Forest in the State of Oregon, having considered the same, recommend that the bill do pass with the following amendment:

On page 1, line 5, at the end of said line, strike out the colon and substitute therefor a comma and add the following words "subject to valid existing rights: ".

The Secretary of Agriculture in reporting on this bill says:

The proposed legislation would include within the Siskiyou National Forest an area of approximately 59,000 acres. These lands are some of the best timberproducing lands in the State of Oregon, but are unsuited to agriculture. All but a very small portion are now in private ownership. In other words, the privately owned lands aggregate in area approximately 57,000 acres and the remaining 2,000 acres are either public domain. State, or lands of the Oregon & California Railroad land-grant, title to which revested in the United States under the act of June 9, 1916.

Practically all of the privately owned lands are owned by the Coos Bay Lumber Co. of Marshfield, Oreg. Some of the lands have all of the commercial timber removed each year. The company does not feel warranted in retaining title to such lands and paying taxes and protection costs on them while producing a new crop of timber. "It is willing to donate the lands to the United States under section 7 of the act of June 7, 1924, which section provides for the owners of lands chiefly valuable for growing timber donating them to the United States. If the lands were abandoned by the company they, of course, will become tax-delinquent and would receive no care other than what the county was able to give them and the information given this Department is to the effect that the county could not afford to incur the expense incidental to protecting these lands from fire.

These lands would undoubtedly serve their highest use if so managed as to insure a future crop of timber. Since they lie adjacent to the Siskiyou National Forest, they could be administered by the Forest Service as a part of said forest by the personnel now provided for looking after that property. In the judgment

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