Images de page
PDF
ePub

SENATE

74TH CONGRESS

1st Session

{

KEPORT No. 311

EXCHANGE OF LANDS RESERVED FOR THE SEMINOLE

INDIANS IN FLORIDA

MARCH 4 (calendar day, March 12), 1935.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. Thomas of Oklahoma, from the Committee on Indian Affairs,

submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany S. 654]

The Committee on Indian Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (S. 654) authorizing the exchange of the land reserved for the Seminole Indians in the State of Florida for other lands, having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it do pass without amendment.

This bill has the approval of the Secretary of the Interior, as set forth in the following letter which is appended hereto and made a part of this report.

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, D. C., March 6, 1935. Hon. ELMER THOMAS,

Chairman Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: Reference is made to your letter of January 24, requesting a report on S. 654, a bill authorizing the exchange of lands reserved for the Seminole Indians in Florida for other lands.

The groups of Seminole Indians now living in Florida are remnants of the Seminole Nation which was moved to Indian Territory (now the State of Oklahoma), in accordance with the treaties of March 28, 1833 (7 Stat. L. 423), January 4, 1845 (9 Stat. L. 821), and August 7, 1856 (11 Stat. L. 699). A number of the Seminole Indians refused to move and receded to the swamps in Florida. Attempts by the Government and by members of the Seminole Nation to persuade them to migrate to the Indian Territory were unsuccessful. Those Indians who remained in Florida lost their rights with the Seminole Nation, and for a number of years no provision was made for them by either the Federal Government or the State of Florida. They lived principally in the Everglades, remaining almost entirely apart from white settlements, and to the present time are shy and retiring in the presence of white people.

Because of the inaccessibility of the swamps in which the Seminoles in Florida lived, little was known of them for a number of years. However, as white civilization began to encroach upon their hunting and fishing grounds, the need for some protection for the Indians became apparent; and in accordance with the acts of August 15, 1894 (28 Stat. L. 303), March 2, 1895 (28 Stat. L. 892), June

10, 1896 (29 Stat. L. 337), June 7, 1897 (30 Stat. L. 78), March 1, 1899 (30 Stat. L. 938), and June 6, 1900 (31 Stat. L. 302), 23,062 acres were purchased for the use of the Indians. By Executive order of June 28, 1911, 3,680 acres of public domain were reserved for the Seminole Indians, making a total of 26,742 acres reserved for them by the Federal Government. There are about 560 Seminole Indians in Florida. The State of Florida has shown a willingness to aid in the care of these Indians, and in 1917 the State legislature authorized a reservation of 99,200 acres of State lands for the use of the Indians.

For the most part, the Indians live in camps in the swamps. Only a few, if any, of the Indians have removed to the lands purchased and reserved for them by the Federal Government, and they make but little use of these lands. Most of the Indians are now living on unreserved State or privately owned land. The purpose of the proposed legislation is to authorize an exchange of the lands purchased and set aside by Executive order for the Indians with the State of Florida for lands on which the Indians are living, or will make use of, and which will be of substantial benefit to them. In view of their reluctance to move in the past, it does not appear that it would be practicable to try to remove them at this time to the areas reserved for them. So long as they are not living on reserved land, this Department cannot use funds appropriated for Indian purposes in improving their homes or aiding them in other ways to improve their methods of living. If the proposed legislation is enacted, it is hoped that lands can be acquired which will be used by the Indians for homes, gardens, farming, and stock raising, and the Indian Service will then be in a position to extend much more help and protection to them. For further information relative to their present living conditions and their needs for assistance, reference is made to the rather lengthy report on the Seminole Indians in Florida made by Mr. Roy Nash in 1930 and printed in full in Senate Document No. 314, Seventy-first Congress, third session.

The area set aside for the Indians by the State of Florida is within the outer boundary of the proposed Everglades National Park. There are at present very few, if any, Indians living upon this tract, and it is hoped the State will set aside for the Indians in lieu of this reserve an area of approximately the same size immediately north of the proposed park. It is believed the lieu tract would be of substantially more benefit to the Indians than the present reserve, and it will fit in well with the program of the Federal Government for improving living conditions among the Seminoles. In view of the foregoing, I recommend that S. 654 be enacted. Sincerely yours,

HAROLD L. ICKES, Secretary of the Interior.

[ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

TO RESERVE CERTAIN PUBLIC-DOMAIN LANDS IN NEVADA AND OREGON AS A GRAZING RESERVE FOR INDIANS OF FORT McDERMITT, NEV.

MARCH 4 (calendar day, March 12), 1935.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. Thomas of Oklahoma, from the Committee on Indian Affairs,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 1142)

The Committee on Indian Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (S. 1142) to reserve certain public-domain lands in Nevada and Oregon as a grazing reserve for Indians of Fort McDermitt, Nev., having considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it do pass without amendment.

This bill was introduced at the request of the Secretary of the Interior, as set forth in his letter of January 16, 1935, a copy of which is appended hereto and made a part of this report as follows:

THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, January 16, 1935. The CHAIRMAN COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS,

United States Senate. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: Transmitted herewith is the draft of a proposed bill to authorize the withdrawal of public-domain lands in Nevada and Oregon as a grazing reserve for the Indians in the vicinity of Fort McDermitt, Nev.

These Indians are of the Paiute and Shoshone tribes. In 1892 individual public-domain allotments were made in Nevada to 80 of them, embracing a total area of approximately 14,000 acres. Owing to the worthless character of the land from an agricultural standpoint the allotments were canceled and replaced with 5-acre irrigable allotments in the same vicinity, embracing a total of only 445 acres. Under this arrangement the area of these Indians' land holdings was diminished about 13,500 acres.

Their present interests and efforts to become self-supporting are mainly centered in cattle raising. The small area included in their allotments is grossly inadequate to meet their needs. Nearby public domain and forest lands in that vicinity are being utilized for range purposes. It is necessary for them to be assured of land for grazing in order properly to care for their increasing herds, the result of their efforts toward self-support. So long as the public domain lands remained subject to disposition under the public-land laws there was grave danger of these Indians being deprived of their range. For this reason on July 7, 1933,

this Department withdrew temporarily from entry, and other disposition, about 3,000 acres of this class of land in Nevada, and approximately 18,500 acres of the same class of land in Oregon until the question of their permanent reservation as a grazing reserve for these Indians could be laid before Congress for consideration, the act of March 3, 1927 (44 Stat. 1347), having prohibited the permanent withdrawal of land for Indian reservation purposes, except by act of Congress. These lands are identified as follows:

NEVADA

Lots 3, 4, and W¥2 lot 5 of sec. 1, lots 1 to 9, inclusive, W44 lot 10 and S+SW14 sec. 2, lots 1 to 10, inclusive, and Sy sec. 3, lots 1 to 10, inclusive, and SEY4 sec. 4, lots 1 to 4, inclusive, and lots 8, 10, 11, and 12 of sec. 5, N42NE/4 sec. 9, NSŃ W/A and NWYNEX sec. 10, T. 47 N., R. 39 E., of the Mount Diablo meridian, Nevada, containing 2,981.32 acres.

OREGON

SE44 sec. 20, WY2SEY and SEYASEYA sec. 21, 844 sec. 22, NWY, SEY, and S SW14 sec. 26, W22, SEY, WYN E%, and NEXNEY4 sec. 27, all of sec. 28, E?, and SW14 sec. 29, all of secs. 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, and SWY4 sec. 36, of T. 40 S., R. 44 E., and all of secs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, W2, NE%, NSE44, and SEYSEYA sec. 12, W22 sec. 13, all of secs. 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, and fractional secs. 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, and W2 of fractional sec. 24 of T. 41 S., R. 44 E., of the Willamette meridian in Oregon, containing 18,520 acres.

Considering the fact that in 1892 these Indians gave up for restoration to the public domain about 13,500 acres that had been allotted to them, it is apparent that this proposed withdrawal will actually involve only about 8,000 acres in excess of their former holdings on the public domain. The area in Oregon, described above, embraces some State school land, which has been included advisedly, as it is probable that the State will exchange such lands for others outside of the area wanted for the Indians upon enactment of this proposed legislation.

In view of the foregoing, I recommend that the enclosed draft of proposed bill be given favorable consideration. Sincerely yours,

HAROLD L. ICKES, Secretary of the Interior.

A BILL to reserve certain public domain lands in Nevada and Oregon as a grazing reserve for Indians of

Fort McDermitt, Nevada Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That public-domain lands in the States of Nevada and Oregon described as Lots 3, 4, and west half Lot 5 of section 1, Lots 1 to 9, inclusive, west half Lot 10 and north half southwest quarter section 2, Lots 1 to 10, inclusive, and south half section 3, Lots 1 to 10, inclusive, and southeast quarter section 4, Lots 1 to 4, inclusive, and Lots 8, 10, 11, and 12 of section 5, north half northeast quarter section 9, north half northwest quarter and northwest quarter northeast quarter section 10, township 47, north, range 39 east, of the Mount Diablo meridian, Nevada; and southeast quarter section 20, west half southeast quarter and southeast quarter southeast quarter section 21, south half section 22, northwest quarter, southeast quarter and south half southwest quarter section 26, west half, southeast quarter, west half northeast quarter and northeast quarter and northeast quarter northeast quarter section 27, all of section 28, east half and southwest quarter section 29, all of sections 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 and southwest quarter section 36, of township 40 south, range 44 east, and all of sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, west half, northeast quarter, north half southeast quarter and southwest quarter southeast quarter section 12, west half section 13, all of sections 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and fractional sections 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 and west half of fractional section 24 of township 41 south, range 44 east, of the Willamette meridian, in Oregon, containing approximately 21,500 acres, be, and the same are hereby, withdrawn from the public domain and reserved for the use and occupancy of Indians of the former Fort McDermitt Military Reserve, Nevada: Provided, That the rights and claims of bona fide settlers initiated under the public-land laws prior to July 7, 1933, shall not be affected by this Act.

O

SENATE

74TH CONGRESS

18t Session

}

REPORT No. 317

CREATION OF INDIAN VILLAGE WITHIN SHOALWATER

INDIAN RESERVATION, WASH.

MARCH 4 (calendar day, March 12), 1935.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. Thomas of Oklahoma, from the Committee on Indian Affairs,

submitted the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 1814)

The Committee on Indian Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (S. 1814) to authorize the creation of an Indian village within the Shoalwater Indian Reservation, State of Washington, having .considered the same, report thereon with a recommendation that it do pass without amendment.

This bill was introduced at the request of the Secretary of the Interior, as set forth in his letter of February 1935, a copy of which is appended hereto and made a part of this report, as follows:

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, D. C., February 6, 1935. The CHAIRMAN COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS,

United States Senate. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: There is transmitted herewith the draft of a proposed bill authorizing the creation of an Indian village on the Shoalwater (Georgetown) Indian Reservation, Wash.

The Shoalwater Reservation was created by Executive order of September 22, 1866, for the use of 30 or 40 families of Indians residing in the vicinity of Shoalwater Bay. In 1927 only three families remained on the reservation, and all members of these families had been allotted on the Quinaielt Reservation with the exception of four children. Under date of April 6, 1927, the President granted authority for allotting the Shoalwater Reservation to these children, in accordance with the act of February 8, 1887 (24 Stat. L. 388), as amended. The allotments were not made immediately, and all persons who would have been entitled tɔ allotments there have now taken allotments on the Quinaielt Reservation. Authority for making the allotments was therefore revoked by the President on December 12, 1932.

A number of Indians from neighboring reservations, principally Quinaielt, go to the Shoalwater Reservation for fishing purposes. On October 16, 1934, the Superintendent of the Taholah Agency reported that nine families had permanently located there and that some of the Indians had sufficient money on deposit at the agency to erect homes, provided they were furnished building lots. The Indians have requested that the reservation be not allotted but that a

« PrécédentContinuer »