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Mr. Walsh, from the Committee on Education and Labor, submitted

the following

REPORT

[To accompany S. 1180]

The Committee on Education and Labor, to whom was referred the bill (S.1180) to amend section 4865 of the Revised Statutes, as amended, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with the recommendation that the bill be passed.

The purpose of the bill is to increase the number of beneficiaries from the several States and Territories who may be admitted to the collegiate department of the Columbia Institution for the Deaf, District of Columbia, from 125 to 145.

The bill was introduced at the request of the Secretary of the Interior, who has endorsed the proposal, and full information indicating the conditions at the Columbia Institution for the Deaf and the assistance being extended to the deaf mutes there, is contained in the letters of the Secretary of the Interior submitted herewith:

INTERIOR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, January 17, 1935. Hon. David I. WALSH, Chairman Committee on Education and Labor,

United States Senate. MY DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: Enclosed is a copy of a proposed bill to amend section 4865 of the Revised Statutes, as amended, increasing the number of beneficiaries from the several States and Territories who may be admitted to the collegiate department of the Columbia Institution for the Deaf.

For the education of deaf mutes in the District of Columbia, the United States has established and maintains the Columbia Institution for the Deaf. The advanced department, known as Gallaudet College, accepts students from outside the District, most of whom are in poor circumstances and need the help of the scholarships offered by the institution. Although Congress has restricted the number of such beneficiaries it has progressively expanded its authorization to provide for a steadily increasing demand for enrollment. Thus the original limit of 40 has been increased first to 60, then to 100, and finally in the year 1918 to 125. The enrollment has again reached a point where authority to increase the number is necessary.

It is respectfully requested, therefore, that this bill be placed before the Senate for appropriate action. Sincerely yours,

HAROLD L. ICKES,

Secretary of the Interior.

INTERIOR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, February 7, 1935. Hon. DAVID I. WALSH,

United States Senate. MY DEAR SENATOR Walsh: Your letter of January 23 expresses a desire for further detailed information in connection with S. 1180, which you introduced at my request.

The Columbia Institution for the Deaf was created by the act of February 16, 1857 (c. 46, 11 Stat. 161), to furnish instruction to the deaf mutes of the District of Columbia, and if necessary to pay for their tuition and maintenance therein. The institution was authorized to accept, also, deaf mutes from any of the States and Territories. The advanced department, known as “Gallaudet College", was authorized by the act of April 8, 1864 (c. 52, 13 Stat. 45), which empowered the directors to confer collegiate degrees. Since 1867 free scholarships have been offered for the collegiate instruction of beneficiaries from the States and Territories.

As the collegiate department grew in size, the number of free scholarships was increased. The last change was made by act of July 1, 1918, when the number was enlarged from 100 to 125. It has now been more than 16 years since any increase has been made in the number of scholarships.

In the year 1918–19 the total number of students in the college was 106. At the opening of the present year the total number was 131. Nearly all of the students come from homes in which the parents are not well to do, and a very large percentage have to be assisted by scholarships. All the scholarships this year were taken up and only 20 to 30 will be vacated by graduation and dismissal in June 1935. The institution is usually asked to accept some 40 new students at the beginning of each college year in the fall. It is necessary, therefore, that the number of scholarships be increased, if the college is to continue to grow and to give aid to these young people.

During its long existence the institution has given an advanced education to nearly 1,900 students. Nearly 1,000 have received collegiate degrees. Partly at least through their educational opportunities, these young people have become self-sustaining citizens. They are engaged in art, architecture, bacteriology, chemistry, printing, publishing, photography, missionary work to the deaf, teaching the deaf, agriculture, library cataloging, government service, and other types of work, many of which they could not have entered without advanced educational preparation.

If it is the pleasure of the committee, President Percival Hall will be very glad to appear, at the convenience of the committee, and furnish any information regarding the institution. ị trust that the committee will regard the bill favorably. Sincerely yours,

HAROLD L. ICKES,

Secertary of the Interior.

INTERIOR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, February 23, 1935. Hon. DAVID I. WALSH,

United States Senate. MY DEAR SENATOR Walsh: You have requested information relating to the cost of the additional scholarships for Gallaudet College authorized by S. 1180, which you introduced at my request.

The expense of such scholarships is borne by the United States. It is included in the annual estimate for the Columbia Institution for the Deaf, and it is covered by the regular appropriation for that institution.

No increase in expense by virtue of the addi onal scholarships is anticipated for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1936. As the college gradually expands, however, it is expected that the additional scholarships would be granted. At the present rate of expansion the full increased authorization would be utilized in perhaps 5 or 10 years. Since the cost of each scholarship is approximately $750 a year, it is estimated that the increased authorization would eventually result in an increased expenditure of approximately $15,000 each year. Sincerely yours,

HAROLD L. ICKES,

Secretary of the Interior. O

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Mr. COPELAND, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted

the following

REPORT

[To accompany H. R. 5913]

The Committee on Appropriations, to which was referred the bill (H. R. 5913) making appropriations for the military and nonmilitary activities of the War Department for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1936, and for other purposes, report the same to the Senate with various amendments, and present herewith information relative to the changes made:

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The changes in the amounts of the House bill recommended by the committee are as follows:

INCREASE
Military activities:

Contingencies, Military Intelligence Division.... $61,000
Expenses of court martial...

15, 000

Pay of the Army:

Increased pay to retired officers on active duty.---
Rental allowances, including allowance for quarters

for enlisted men on duty

136, 524

60, 860

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AUTHORIZE THE SECRETARIES OF WAR AND NAVY TO LEND EQUIPMENT FOR THE NATIONAL JAMBOREE, BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA

MARCH 4, 1935.-Ordered to be printed

Mr. SHEPPARD, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted

the following

REPORT

(To accompany S. 935)

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (S. 935) to authorize the Secretary of War and the Secretary of the Navy to lend Army and Navy equipment for use at the national jamboree of the Boy Scouts of America, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with a recommendation that it do pass, amended as follows:

On page 2, line 2, after the word “officials” strike out the colon, insert a comma and add the following: "and also furnish a camp site on the Fort Myer Military Reservation, Fort Myer, Virginia."

An identical bill (H. R. 3800) has been reported favorably by the Military Affairs Committee of the House.

Attached hereto and made a part hereof are reports upon this bill from the Secretary of War and Secretary of the Navy. While the report from the Secretary of the Navy is adverse it is pointed out that the bill reads that the furnishing of the equipment is merely "authorized” and further “at their discretion", and therefore in no way mandatory upon the Navy to furnish equipment.

WASHINGTON, February 1, 1935. Hon. MORRIS SHEPPARD, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs,

United States Senate. DEAR SENATOR SHEPPARD: Careful consideration has been given to the bill 8. 935 which you transmitted to the War Department under date of January 16, 1935, with a request for information and the views of the Department relative thereto.

There is no existing law on the subject of the loan of government property for the purpose indicated in this bill. The bill provides for a bond to protect

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