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ON HEARING A ROBIN SING IN A PLACE OF WORSHIP.

(Communicated by Mr. W. B. BROWNE, of Kettering.)
WHILE grateful crowds their ready homage pay,
And holy chantings hail the sacred day,
While the loud choir its note responsive swells,
And the rapt soul in mute attention dwells,
Say, little Robin, winter's sweetest bird,
Shall thy small twitter waft its notes unheard ?
Shall the pure offering of thy native song
Unheeded pass, the loftier strains among ?
Ah no! lone songstress; humble though thy note,
Though small the tribute of thy warbling throat,
Yet, in His eye, who marks the sparrow fall,
Who, ever present, reigns the Lord of All,
To Him the feeblest song, the simplest prayer,
To find an audit needs but be sincere.
Nor, midst the skilful tunes of vocal art,
Will He o'erlook the incense of the heart,
But ever deign to lend a gracious ear,
Thy hymns and mine, sweet moralist, to hear.

MORTALITY AND IMMORTALITY.
(By SELWICK ASBORNE, of Wilmington, Delaware.)
What is the Body? Fragile, frail

As vegetation's tender leaf,
Transient as April's fitful gale,

And as the flashing meteor brief.
When long this miserable frame

Hath vanish'd from life's busy scene,
This earth shall roll, that sun shall flame,

As though this dust had never been.
What is the Soul ? Immortal mind,

Unlimited as thought's vast range;
By grovelling matter unconfin'd;

The same, while states and empires change.
When suns have wan'd, and worlds sublime

Their final revolutions told,
This soul shall triumph over time,

As though such orbs had never rollid.

LINES SUPPOSED TO BE SPOKEN BY A SKULL. [It is said that Dr. DODDRIDGE had always in his study a human skull, into whose mouth he put the following lines, which he composed for the purpose, and imagined the skull to be speaking them to him. Kettering.

W.B. BROWNE.]

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Why choose you in a maze of books to stray?
I dictate wisdom in a shorter way;
Nor need I words my purpose to dispense,
For looks like mine are powerful eloquence.
Behold these ruins of a human frame,
And tell me from what sepulchre they came;
My rank, my genius, or my form declare; 2.
Say, was I great or mean, deform'd or fair,
The public scandal, or the public care?
Alas, thou knowest not, thy pride must own,
That thou thyself shall be as much unknown;
Thus shall thy beauties moulder in the dust,
The sparkling eye, and smiling cheek be lost;
Thy learned brains shall be to worms a prey,
And every curious trace be worn away ;
Learned in vain, till thou the secret have,
Or to avoid, or triumph o'er, the grave.

“ FOLLOW ME.”

Matt. ix. 9.
MY SAVIOUR, can I follow thee,

When all is dark before,
While midnight rests upon the sea,

How can I reach the shore ?
0, let thy Star of Love but shine,

Though with a feeble ray,
'Twill gild the edge of every wave,

And light my gloomy way.
Then gladly will I follow Thee,

Though hurricanes appear ;
Singing sweet carols o'er the sea,

A cheerful mariner!
Prialed by T. CORDEUX, 14, City. Road, London.

"FOLLOW ME:

From the Youths Instrueter Pa 36 January 15 ".

Composed by M! CHARLES WESLEY, inscribed to the Author of the Words.Feb.4.182.'.

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LINES SUPPOSED TO BE SPOKEN BY A SKULL. [It is said that Dr. DODDRIDGE had always in study a human skull, into whose mouth he put following lines, which he composed for the purp and imagined the skull to be speaking them to hin Kettering

W.B. BROWN

Why choose you in a maze of books to stray
I dictate wisdom in a shorter way;
Nor need I words my purpose to dispense,
For looks like mine are powerful eloquence
Behold these ruins of a human frame,
And tell me from what sepulchre they cam
My rank, my genius, or my form declare:
Say, was I great or mean, deform'd or fair
The public scandal, or the public care ?
Alas, thou knowest not, thy pride must o
That thou thyself shall be as much unkno
Thus shall thy beauties moulder in the di
The sparkling eye, and smiling cheek be
Thy learned brains shall be to worms a
And every curious trace be worn away;
Learned in vain, till thou the secret have
Or to avoid, or triumph o'er, the grave,

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