The Tragic Sense of Life: Ernst Haeckel and the Struggle over Evolutionary Thought

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University of Chicago Press, 15 nov. 2008 - 512 pagina's
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Prior to the First World War, more people learned of evolutionary theory from the voluminous writings of Charles Darwin’s foremost champion in Germany, Ernst Haeckel (1834–1919), than from any other source, including the writings of Darwin himself. But, with detractors ranging from paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould to modern-day creationists and advocates of intelligent design, Haeckel is better known as a divisive figure than as a pioneering biologist. Robert J. Richards’s intellectual biography rehabilitates Haeckel, providing the most accurate measure of his science and art yet written, as well as a moving account of Haeckel’s eventful life.

 

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Inhoudsopgave

1 Introduction
1
2 Formation of a Romantic Biologist
19
3 Research in Italy and Conversion to Darwinism
55
4 Triumph and Tragedy at Jena
79
5 Evolutionary Morphology in the Darwinian Mode
113
Experimental Justification of Evolution
171
7 The Popular Presentation of Evolution
217
8 The Rage of the Critics
277
10 Love in a Time of War
391
The Tragic Sense of Ernst Haeckel
439
A Brief History of Morphology
455
The Moral Grammar of Narratives in the History of Biologythe Case of Haeckel and Nazi Biology
489
Conclusion
512
Bibliography
513
Index
541
Copyright

Ants Embryos and Jesuits
343

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Over de auteur (2008)

Robert J. Richards is the Morris Fishbein Professor of the History of Science and Medicine at the University of Chicago and the author, most recently, of The Romantic Conception of Life: Science and Philosophy in the Age of Goethe, also published by the University of Chicago Press.

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