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“Me cry! I've never done that since I be more suitable than a match between I came to man's estate,” cried Rolls in. John Erskine, the young master of Daldignantly, but after a suspicious pause. rulzian, who knew nothing about his naAs for wishing you back, Miss Nora, tive country, and Nora Barrington, who wishing you were never to go, — wishing was its adopted child, and loved the old you would grow to the walk, as the cornel house as much as if she had been born in says " This was so much from such it? Mrs. Barrington, perhaps, was not a speaker, that he turned, and added in a quite unconscious of this plan, though not changed tone, “ You'll have grand weather a word had been said by any of these in. for your journey, cornel. But you must nocent plotters. For indeed what '

manner inind the twa ferries, and no be late start of man young Erskine was, and whether ing," -a sudden reminder which broke he was worthy of Nora, or in the least up the little group, and made an end of likely to please her, were things altogether the scene of leave-taking. It was the unknown to the county, where he had not farewell volley of friendly animosity with been seen for the last dozen years. which Rolls put a stop to his own per- Anyhow he was coming as fast as the verse inclination to be soft-hearted over railway could carry him, while Nora took the departure of the English tenants. leave of her parents at the station. The “ He could not let us go without that part. young man then on his way was not even ing shot,” the “cornel” said, as he put aware of her existence, though she knew his wife into the jingling “coach” from all about him - or rather about his antethe station, which, every better vehicle cedents; for about John Erskine bimself having been sent off beforehand, was all no one in the neighborhood had much that remained to carry them away.

information. He had not set foot in the The Barringtons during their residence county since he was a boy of tender years at Dalrulzian had been received into the and unformed character, whose life had very heart of the rural society, in which been swallowed up in that of an alien at first there had sprung up a half.grudge family, of pursuits and ideas far separated against the almost unknown master of the from those of his native place. It almost place, whose coming was to deprive them seemed, indeed, as if it were far from a of a family group so pleasant and so happy arrangement of Providence which bright. The tenants themselves, though made young John Erskine the master of their turn was over, felt instinctively as if this sinall estate in the north; or rather, they were expelled for the benefit of our perhaps, to mount a little higher, we might intruder, and entertained this grudge venture to say that it was a very embarwarmly. “Mr. Erskine might just as rassing circumstance, and the cause of a well have stayed away,” Nora said. “ He great deal of confusion in this life that can't care about it as we do." Her mother Henry Erskine, his father, should have laughed and chid, and shared the senti. died when he did. Whatever might be ment. “ But then it's his ain place,' as the consequences of that step to himself, old Rolls says.” “And I dare say he to others it could scarcely be characthinks there is twice as much shooting," terized but as a mistake. That young said the colonel complacently: “I did, man had begun to live an honest, wholewhen we came. He'll be disappointed, some life, as a Scotch country gentleman you'll see.” This gave him a faint sort of should; and if he had continued to exist, satisfaction. In Nora's mind there was a bis wife would have been like other coun. different consolation, which yet was not a try gentlemen's wives, and his child, consolation, but a mixture of expectancy brought up at home, would have grown and curiosity, and that attraction which like the heather in adaptation to the soil. surrounds an unconscious enemy. She But when he was so ill advised as to die, was going to make acquaintance with this confusion of every kind ensued. The supplanter, this innocent foe, who was widow was young, and Dalrulzian was turning them out of their home because solitary. She lived there, devoutly and it was his home — the most legitimate conscientiously doing her duty, for some

She was about to pay å series years. Then she went abroad, as every: of visits in the country, to the various body does, for that change of air and neighbors, who were all fond of her and scene which is so necessary to our lives. reluctant to part with her. Perhaps her And in Switzerland she met a clergyman, mother had some idea of the vague to whom change had also been necessary, scheme of match - making which had and who was taking the duty” in a sprung up in some minds, a plan to bring mountain caravansary of tourists. What the young people together; for what could opportunities there are in such a position !

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She was pensive, and he was sympathetic. ( the best education that England can He had a sister, whom she invited to give." Dalrulzian, "if she did not mind winter " You'll be for sending him to that idol in the north ;” and Miss Kingsford did of the English,” said the old lady, “a not mind winter anywhere, so long as it public school, as they call it. As if all was for her brother's advantage. The our Scoich schools from time immemoend was that Mrs. Erskine became Mrs. rial hadn't been public schools! Well, Kingsford, to the great though silent as. and after that tonishment of litile John, now eleven “ It is only an idea,” said little Mrs. years old, who could not make it out. Kingsford humbly -“not settled, nor They remained at Dalrulzian for a year or anything like settled; but they say if I two, for Mr. Kingsford rather liked the were to let the house shooting, and the power of asking a friend Aunt Barbara's gray eyes flashed; peror two to share it. But at the end of that haps they were slightly green, as ill-natime he got a living a good living; for tured people said. But she fired her guns events, whether good or evil, never come in the air, so to speak, and once more singly; and, taking John's interests into grimly smiled. “I saw something very full consideration, it was decided that the like all this in your wedding cards, Mary; best thing to be done was to let the house. she said. “No, no, no apologies. I will Everybody thought this advisable, even not like to see a stranger in my father's John's old grand-aunt at Dunearn, of house; but that's no-thing, that's no-thing. whom his' mother was more afraid than of I will not say but it's very judicious; only all her trustees put together. It was with you'll mind the boy's an Erskine, and fear and trembling that she had ventured here he'll have to lead his lise... Mind and to unfold this hesitating intention to the not make too much of an Englishman out old lady. “Mr. Kingsford thinks”. and of a Scotch lad, for he'll have to live his then it occurred to the timid little woman life here.. that Mr. Kingsford's opinion as to the “Too much of an Englishman!” Mr. disposal of Henry Erskine's house might Kingsford cried, when this conversation not commend itself to Aunt Barbara. was reported to him. “ I am afraid your Mr. Monypenny says,” she added, fal- old lady is an old fool, Mary. How could tering; then stopped and looked with he be too much of an Englishman? Am alarm in Miss Erskine's face.

I out of place here? Does not the greater “What are you frightened for, my dear? breeding include the less ?” he said, with Mr. Kingsford has a right to his opinion, bis grand air. His wife did not always and Mr. Monypenny is a very discreet quite follow his meaning, but she always person, and a capital man of business.” believed in it as something that merited

• They think – it would be a good thing understanding; and she was quite as for – John; for, Aunt Barbara, he is deeply convinced as if she had undergrowing a big boy, - we must be thinking stood. And accordingly the house was of his education

let to Colonel Barrington, who had not a “That's true," said the old lady, with a "place" of his own, though his elder smile that was the grimmest thing about brother had, and the Kingsfords “ went her. It was very uphill work continuing south” to their rectory, with which John's a labored explanation under the light of mother in particular was mightily pleased. this smile.

It was in a far richer country than that “ And he cannot — be educated which surrounded Dalrulzian,

a land here."

flowing with milk and cheese, if not “ Wherefore no? I cannot see that, my honey, — full of foliage and flowers. Mrs. dear. His father was educated in Edin Kingsford, having been accustomed only burgh, which is what I suppose you mean to Scotland, was very much elated with by here. Many a fine fellow's been bred the luxuriant beauty of the place. She up at Edinburgh College, I can tell you; spoke of England” as the travelled more than you'll find in any other place I speak of Italy, as if this climate of ever heard of.

Eh! what ails you at ours, which we abuse so much, was paraEdinburgh? It's well known to be an dise. She thought "the English " so excellent place for schools — schools of frank, so open, so demonstrative. To all kinds."

live in “the south” seemed the height “Yes, Aunt Barbara. But then you of happiness to her. Innocent primitive know, Jolin – they say he will have such Scotch gentlewomen are prone to talk in a fine position - a long minority and a this way: Mr. Kingsford, who knew betgood estate — they say he should have ter, and who himself liked to compare

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notes with people who winter in Italy, did | only of special corners in the woods, and what he could to check her exuberance, turns of the stream, where he nibbled as but she was too simple to understand a boy at the big sports, which are the life why,

of men in the country, but above all of John, ber son, did not share her feel the house, the landscape, the great sweep ings at first. John was generally confused of land and sky, of which, when he shut and disturbed in his mind by all that had his eyes, be could always conjure up a happened. He had not got over his won- vague vision. He thought of it with a der at the marriage, when he was carried sort of grudge that it was not within his off to this new and alien home. He did reach - keen at first, but afterwards very not say much. There was little opening faint and slight, as the boy's sentiments by which he could communicate his feel died away in those of the man. ings. He could not disapprove, being too Meanwhile it was an excellent arrange. young; and now that Mr. Kingsford was ment, who could doubt, for John's interest always there, the boy had no longer the - instead of keeping up the place, to have opportunity to influence his mother as, a rent for it; and he had the most excel. young as he was, he bad hitherto done lent man of business, who nursed his es6 tyrannize over his mother," some people tate like a favorite child; so that when his called it. All that was over.

minority was over, and Colonel Barring. zled, the boy was dropped back into a ton's lease out, John Erskine was in a properly subordinate position, which no more favorable position than any one of doubt was much better for him; but it his name had been for some generations. was a great change. To do him justice, The estate was small. When his father he was never insubordinate; but he looked died, exclusive of Mrs. Erskine's jointure, at his mother's husband with eyes out of there was not much more than a thousand which the perplexity never died. There a year to come out of it; and on fifteen was a permanent confusion ever after in hundred a year his father had thought his sense of domestic relationships, and himself very well off, and a happy man. the duty he owed to his seniors and supe- In the mean time, there had been accumu. riors; for he never quite knew how it was lations which added considerably to this that Mr. Kingsford had become the mas. income, almost making up the suin which ter of his fate, though a certain innate Mrs. Kingsford enjoyed for her life. And pride, as well as his love of his mother, John had always been treated at the rectaught him to accept the yoke which he tory as a golden youth, bappily exempted could not throw off. Mr. Kingsford was from all the uncertainty and the need determined to do his duty by John. He of making their own way, which his stepvowed when he gave the somewhat reluc- father announced, shaking his head, to be tant, proud little Scotsman - feeling him- the fate of his own boys. Her eldest son, self at eleven too old to be kissed - a who was in “such a different position,” solemn embrace, that he would do the boy was a great pride to Mrs. Kingsford, even “every justice.” He should have the when it seemed to her half an injury that best education, the most careful guardian- her other children should have no share ship; and Mr. Kingsford kept his word. in his happiness. But indeed she conHe gave the boy an ideal education from soled herself by reflecting, an eldest son his own point of view. He sent him to is always in a very different position; and Eton, and, when the due time came, to no elder brother could have been kinder Oxford, and considered his advantage in voluntarily undertaking to send Regievery way; and it is needless to say, that nald to Eton, “which was a thing we as John grew up, the sensation of incon- never could have thought of with no gruity, the wonder that was in his mind money,” as soon as he came of age ; and as to this sudden interference with all the in every way comporting himself as a natural arrangements of his life, died good son and brother. away. It came to be a natural thing to There were, however, points in this him that Mr. Kingsford should have early training which were bad for John. charge of his affairs. And he went home He 'acquired an exaggerated idea of the to the rectory for the holidays to find now importance of this position of his. He and then a new baby, but all in the quiet, was known both at school and college as natural way of use and wont, with no a youth of property, the representative longer anything that struck him as strange of a county family. These words mean in his relationships. And yet he was put more at Eton and Oxford than they reout of the natural current of his life. Boy quire to do at Edinburgh or St. Andrews. as he was, he thought sometimes, not | And in these less expensive precincts,

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CHAPTER II.

Erskine of Dalrulzian would have been had been early that year, and everything known for what he was. Whereas in was early. He stayed in town a week or “the south " nobody knew anything two, saw all that was going on at the theabout the dimensions of lis estate, or the atres, got all the last information that was limits of his income, and everybody sup- to be had at the club on Parliamentary posed him a young north-country poten. matters, waited a day more "to see the tate, with perhaps a castle or two and pictures," and then set off on his home. unlimited 16

— who would be an ward way. He had everything a young excellent fellow to know as soon as he man of fortune requires, except a servant, came into his own. This was John's own for his habits were independent. He had opinion in all these earlier days of youth. been “knocking about," and there was no He did not know what his income was; room at the rectory for such an appen. and had he known, the figures would not dage. So he took his own ticket, and have meant anything particular to him. himself saw his multifarious portman. A thousand a year seems to imply a great teaus placed in the van which was to go deal of spending to a youth on an allow. " through.” There were a great many ance of three hundred; and he accepted mingled elements in his pleasure, the everybody's estimate of his importance satisfaction of “coming to his kingdom; with pleased satisfaction. After all the the pleasure of renewing old associations, explanations which followed his coming and taking his natural place; the exciteof age, he had indeed a touch of disen- ment of novelty - for it would all be as chantment and momentary alarm, feeling new to him, this home which he had not the details to be less splendid than he had seen for a dozen years, as if he had never expected. But Mr. Monypenny evidently been there before. From thirteen to considered them anything but insignif. five-and-twenty, what a difference! He cant- and a man of his experience, the began to look about him with a new sensayouth felt, was bound to know. He had tion as the morning rose after that long gone abroad in the interval between leav- night journey, and he felt himself aping Oxford and coming "home" to take proaching home. possession of his kingdom. He was not dissipated or extravagant, though he had spent freely. He was a good specimen of OLD RO had been butler at Dalrulzian a young man of his time determined since John Erkskine was a child. He had that everything about him should be in “stayed on” after Mrs. Erskine's second

good form,” and very willing to do his marriage with reluctance, objecting seduty and be bon prince to his dependants. riously to a step.master at all, and still And he anticipated with pleasure the life more to one that was an “ English minis. of a country gentlemen, such as he had ter;" but the house bad many attractions seen it in his mother's neighborhood, and for him. He liked the place; his sister in several houses of his college friends to was the cook, a very stationary sort of which he had been invited. Sometimes, woman, who had the greatest disinclinaindeed, it would occur to him that his tion to move. She was a sort of human recollections of Dalrulzian were on a less cat, large and smooth and good-natured, extensive scale; but a boy's memory is almost always purring, satisfied with heralways flattering to a home which he has self and all who were moderately good to not seen since his earliest years. Thus ber; and, as was natural, she made the it was with a good deal of pleasant excite. butler very comfortable, and was extremement that he set out from Milton Magna, ly attentive to all his little ways. When his stepfather's rectory, where he had Colonel Barrington took the house, Rolls gone to see his mother and the children once more expressed his determination for a week or two on his return from the to leave. “ What for?” said the placid Continent. The season was just begin. Bauby; "the gentleman was keen to have ning, but John, full of virtue and hope, a' the servants - a' the servants that decided that he would not attempt to in. would bide.” A' the servants! there's dulge in the pleasures of the season. Far so many of us,” said Rolls derisively. better to begin his real life, to make ac. There were indeed only himself, the cook, quaintance with his home and his “peo and one housemaid ; the other, who had ple,” than to snatch a few balls and edge charge of John in his earlier days, and his way through a few crowded recep- still was attached to him more or less, tions, and feel himself nobody. This was had gone with the family - and so, of not a thing which John much liked. He course,

had Mrs. Kingsford's maid. had been somebody all his life. Easter “We'll mak'a grand show in the servants'

VOL. XXXVIII. 1960

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LIVING AGE,

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hall — we're just a garrison," Rolls said. / air, through which every creak of the We're plenty for a' the work there is jingling harness and every jolt of the the now," said the mild woman, “and wheels sounded so distinctly, and the voice they'll bring some with them. What ails of Jock Beaton apostrophizing his wornye to bide? You're real well aff — and out horse, and watched the lingering de. me that kens exactly how you like your parture with feelings of a very mingled meat. · Where would you be studied as I description. “There's feenis put to that study you? You may just be thankful chapter,” he said to himself aloud. it's in your power." "It was with the “We're well rid of them.” But he lin. Erskines I took service,” said Rolls. gered as long as the yellow panels could “I'm no sure that I could put up with be seen gleaming through the trees at the strangers, and them just travelling En- turn of the road, without any of the jubiglish. Besides, I've never been clear lation in his face which he expressed in that service is my vocation. A kent fam- bis words. At that last turn, just when ily is one thing, a foreign master another. the “coach” reached the highroad, some. Him and me would very likely no get on thing white was waved from the window, - or them and me would no get on. All which very nearly made an end of Rolls. went very

well in the last reign. Hairy He uttered something which at first Erskine was a gentleman, like all his fore. sounded like a sob, but was turned into a bears before him ; but how am I to tell laugh, so to speak, before it fell into that who is this cornel, or whatever they ca' telltale air which preserved every grada. him - a man I never heard tell of before? tion of sound. “It's that bit thing!” I'll give them over the keys, and maybe Rolls said, more sentimental than perhaps I'll wait till they're suited, but nobody he had ever been in his life. His fine can ask me to do more."

feeling was, however, checked abruptly. Hoot, Tammas!” said his sister : “You're greetin' yourself, Tammas,” said which was the highest height of remon- a soft, round voice, interrupted by sobs, strance she ever reached. Notwithstand over his shoulder. “Me greetin'!” he ing this, however, year after year Rolls turned round upon her with a violence had "stayed on.” He was very distinct that, if Bauby had been less substantial in pointing out to “the cornel” the supe- and less calm, would have driven her to riority of his native masters, and the dis- the other end of the house; “I'm just advantage to Scotland of having so many laughin' to see the nonsense you womenof the travelling English taking up the folk indulge in: but it's paardonable in the houses of the gentry; but he was an ex. case of a bit creature like Miss Nora. cellent servant, and his qualities in this And I allow they have a right to feel it. way made up for his defects in the other Where will they find a bonnie place like

if, indeed, those defects did not tell in Dalrulzian, and next to nothing in the his favor; for a Scotch servant who is a way of rent or keeping up? But I'm character is, like a ghost, a credit to any thankful mysel to see the nest cleared old and respectable house. The Barring- out, and the real man in it. What are tons were proud of old Rolls. They laid you whimpering about? It's little you've temptations in his way and made hiin talk seen of them, aye in your

kitchen." “ Me whenever they had visitors; and his crit-seen little of them !" cried Bauby, roused icisms on the English, and the opinions to a kind of soft indignation; "the best which he freely enunciated on all subjects, part of an hour with the mistress every had often kept the party in amusement. day of my life, and as kind a sympathizRolls, however, had not been able to de.ing woman! There'll be nae leddy now fend himself against a certain weakness to order the dinners — and that's a great for the children, specially for Nora, who responsibility, let alone anything else." was very small when the family came to “Go away with your responsibility. I'll Dalrulzian, and whom he had brought up, order your dinners,” said Rolls. “Well," as he flattered himself, regretting much said Bauby, not without resignation, " to all the time that she was not an Erskine be a servant, and no born a gentleman, and natural-born daughter of the house. you've aye been awfu' particular about Rolls did not by any means see the de- your meat." And she withdrew consoled, parture of the Barringtons unmoved, not- ihough drying her eyes, to wonder if Mr. withstanding that he hurried them away. John would be “awfu' particular about He stood for a long time looking after the his meat,” or take whatever was offered “coach," which was a sort of rude omni- to him, after the fashion of some young bus, as it jolted down the avenue.

The men.

Meat, it must be explained, to old servant stood in the clear morning Bauby Rolls meant food of all descrip.

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