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which had greatly excited Mrs. Dutton's curiosity, for. Accordingly the bell only changed to the final and she was sure that the direction, "For Mrs. Jean impatient chime when they crossed the stile; and Deans, at Auchingower, parish of Knocktarlitie," rang in,” that is, concluded its misturied summong, was the writing of Mrs. Semple, the Duchess's own when they had entered the Duke's seat, in the little woman. May Hettly produced the key in a sealed kirk, where the whole party arranged themselves, parcel, which bare the same address, and attached to with Duncan at their head, excepling David Deans, the key was a label, intimating that the trunk and who already occupied a seat among the elders. its contents were "a token of remembrance to Jeanie The business of the day, with a particular detail Deans, from her friends the Duchess of Argyle and of which it is unnecessary to trouble the reader, was the young ladies.” The trunk, hastily opened, as the gone through according to the established form, and reader will not doubt, was found to be full of wearing the sermon pronounced upon the occasion had the apparel of the best quality, suited to Jeanie's rank in good fortune to please even the critical David Deans, life; and to most of the articles the names of the though it was only an hour and a quarter long, particular donors were attached, as if to make Jeanie which David termed a short allowance of spiritual sensible not only of the general, but of the individual provender. interest she had excited in the noble family. To name The preacher, who was a divine that held man; the various articles by their appropriate names, would of David's opinions, privately apologized for his be to attempt things, unattempted yet in prose or brevity by saying, " That he observed the Captain rhyme; besides, that the old-fashioned ternis of man was ganting grievously, and that if he had detained teaus, sacques, kissing-strings, and so forth, would him longer," there was no knowing how long he convey but little inforination even to the milliners of might be in paying the next term's victual stipend." the present day. I shall deposit, however, an accu- David groaned to find that such carnal motives curate inventory of the contents of the trunk with could have influence upon the mind of a powerful my kind friend, Miss Martha Buskbody, who has preacher. He had, indeed, been scandalized by an promised, should the public curiosity seem interested other circumstance during the service. in the subject, to supply me with a professional glos- So soon as the congregation were seated after sary and commentary. Suffice it to say, that the prayers, and the clergyman had read his text, the gift was such as became the donors, and was suited gracious Duncan, after rummaging the leathern to the situation of the receiver; that every thing was purse which hung in front of his petticoat, produced handsome and appropriate, and nothing forgotten a short tobacco-pipe made of iron, and observed, alwhich belonged to the wardrobe of a young person most aloud, “I hae forgotten my spleuchan-Lachin Jeanie's situation in life, the destined bride of a re- lan, gang down to the Clachan, and bring me up, a spectable clergyman.

pennyworth of twist.”. Six arms, the nearest withArticle after article was displayed, commented up-in

reach, presented with an obedient start, as many on, and admired, to the wonder of May, who declar- tobacco-pouches to the man of office. 'He made ed," she didna think the Queen had mair or better choice of one with a nod of acknowledgment, filled daise, and somewhat to the envy of the northern his pipe, lighted it with the assistance of his pistolCowslip. This unamiable, but not very unnatural, flint, and smoked with infinite composure during the disposition of mind, broke forth in sundry unfounded whole time of the sermon. When ihe discourse was criticisms to the disparagement of the articles, as finished, he knocked the ashes out of his pipe, replathey were severally exhibited. But it assumed a ced it in his sporran, returned the tobacco-pouch or more direct character, when, at the bottom of all

, spleuchan to its owner, and joined in the prayer with was found a dress of white silk, very, plainly made decency and attention. but still of white silk, and French silk to boot, with

At the end of the service, when Butler had been paper pinned to it, bearing, that it was a present admitted minister of the kirk, of Knocktarlitie, with from the Duke of Argyle to his travelling companion, all its spiritual immunities and privileges, David, who to be worn on the day when she should change her had frowned, groaned, and murmured at Knockdun

dor's irreverent demeanour, communicated his plain Mrs. Dutton could forbear no longer, but whis-thoughts of the matter to Isaac Meiklehose, one of pered into Mr. Archibald's ear, that it was a clever the elders, with whom a reverential aspect and huge thing to be a Scotchwoman: She supposed all her grizzle wig had especially disposed him to seek fratersisters, and she had half a dozen, might have been nization. It didna become a wild Indian,” David hanged,

without any one sending her a present of a said, "much less a Christian, and a gentleman, to sit pocket handkerchief.”

in the kirk puffing tobacco-reek, as if he were in a "Or without your making any exertion to save change-house." them, Mrs. Dolly," answered Archibald drily. But Meiklehose shook his head, and allowed it was "far I am surprised we do not hear the bell yet," said he, frae beseeming—But what will ye say? 'The Captain's looking at his watch.

a queer hand, and to speak to him about that or ony “Fat ta deil

, Mr. Archibald," answered the Cap- thing else that crosses the maggot, wad be to set tho tain of Knockdunder, "wad ye hae them ring the kiln a-low. He keeps a high hand ower the country, Dell before I am ready to gang to kirk 3–1 wad gar and we couldna deal wi' the Hielandmen without his the bedral eat the bell-rope, if he took ony sic free- protection, sin' a' the keys o' the kintray hings at his dom. But if ye want to hear the bell, I will just belt; and he's no an ill body in the main, and maistry, show mysell on the knowe-head, and it will begin ye ken, maws the meadows doun." Jowing forth with."

“That may be very true, neighbour," snid David · Accordingly, so soon as they sallied out, and that but Reuben Butler isna the man I take him to be the gold-laced' hat of the Captain was seen rising if he disna learn the Captain to fuff his pipe some like Hesper above the dewy verge of the rising other gate than in God's house, or the quarter be ground, the clash (for it was rather a clash than a ower. dang) of the bell was heard from the old moss-grown "Fair and softly gangs far," said Meiklehose; "and tower

, and the clapper continued to thump its crack- if a fule may gie a wise man a counsel, I wad hae him od sides all the while they advanced towards the think twice or he mells wi' Knockdunder-He suld kirk, Duncan exhorting them to take their own time, hae a lang-shankit spune that wad sup kail wi' the " for teil ony sport wad be till he came.

deil. But they are a' away to their dinner to the Telling to service in Scotland.-In the old days of Scotland sound as throat of flesh could imitate throat of iron. Bellism/ shen persons of property (unless they happened to be non. bellum! was sounded

forth in a more urgent manner; but he furore) were as regular as their inferiors in attendance on paro- never sent forth the third and conclusivo peal, the varied luno chial worship, there was a kind of etiquette, in waiting till the of which is called in Scotland the ringing.tr, until the tw patron or acknowledged great man of the parish should make principal heritors of the parish approached, when the chias his appearance. This ceremonial was 90 sacred in the eyes of ran thus :a parish beadle in the Lsle of Bute, that the kirk bell being out

Bellum Bellullum, of order, he is said to have mounted the steeple every Sunday,

Berrera and Knockdow's coming ? to imitate with his voice the successive summonxes which its mouth of metal used to send forth. The first part of this imi

Bernera and Knockdow's coming tative harmony was simply the repetition of the words Bell bell, 2.2 bell, two or three times in a manner as much resembling the Theroby intimanng, that service was instantly to process

name.

1*

Bellum Beliellum,

change-house, and if we dinna mend our pace, we'll at Auchingower, and left the gentlemen to their pota come short at meal-time."

Hons. David accompanied his friend without answer ; but The feast proceeded with great glee. The converbegan to feel from experience, that the glen of Knock-sation, where Duncan had it under his direction, was tarlitie, like the rest of the world, was haunted by its not indeed always strictly canonical, but David Beans own special subjects of regret and discontent. His escaped any risk of being scandalized, by engaging mind was so much occupied by considering the best with one of his neighbours in a recapitulation of the means of converting Duncan of Knock to a sense of sufferings of Ayrshire and Lanarkshire, during what reverent decency during public worship, that he alto- was called the invasion of the Highland Host; the gether forgot to inquire, whether Butler was called prudent Mr. Meiklehose cautioning them from time to upon to subscribe the oaths to government.

time to lower their voices, for that "Duncan Knock's Some have insinuated, that his neglect on this head father had been at that onslaught, and brought back was, in some degree, intentional; but I think this ex- muckle gude plenishing, and that Duncan was no planation inconsistent with the simplicity of my unlikely to hae been there himsel for what he friend David's character. Neither have I ever been kend." able, by the most minute enquiries, to know whether Meanwhile, as the mirth grew fast and furious, the the formula, at which he so much scrupled, had been graver members of the party began to escape as well exacted from Butler, aye or no. The books of the as they could. David Deans accomplished his retreal, kirk-session might have thrown some light on this and Butler anxiously watched an opportunity to fol. matter ; but unfortunately they were destroyed in the low him. Knockdunder, however, desirous, he said, year 1746, by one Donacha Phu na Dunaigh, at the of knowing what stuff was in the new minister, had instance, it was said, or at least by the connivance, no intention to part with him so easily, but kepi him of the gracious Duncan of Knock, who had a desire pinned to his side, watching him sedulously, and with to obliterate the recorded foibles of a certain Kate obliging violence filling his glass to the brim, as often Finlayson.

as he could seize an opportunity of doing so. At length, as the evening was wearing late, a venerable

brother chanced to ask Mr. Archibald when they CHAPTER XLVI.

might hope to sce the Duke, tam carum caput, as he

would venture to term him, at the Lodge of RoseNow butt and ben the change-house fills

neath. Duncan of Knock, whose ideas were some Wi' yill-caup commentators,

what conglomerated, and who, it may be believed, Here's crying out for bakes and gills,

was po great scholar, catching up some imperfeci And there the pint-stoup clatters. Wi' thick and thrang, and loud and lang.

sound of ihe words, conceived the speaker was draw. Wi' logic and wi' scripture,

ing a parallel between the Duke and Sir Donald They raise a din that in the end

Gorme of Sleat; and being of opinion that such comIs like to breed a rupture, 0' wrath that day.--BURNS.

parison was odious, snorted thrice, and prepared him

self to be in a passion. A PLEYTIFUL entertainment, at the Duke of Ar- To the explanation of the venerable divine the Capgyle's cost, regaled the reverend gentlemen who had tain answered, "I heard the word Gorme inyself, sir, assisted at the ordination of Reuben Butler, and almost with my ain ears. D'ye think I do not know Gaelic all the respectable part of the parish. The feast was, from Latin?" indeed, such as the country itself furnished; for plenty "Apparently not, sir;"-80 the clergyman, offend. of all the requisites for “a rough and round" dinner ed in his turn, and taking a pinch of snuff, answered were always at Duncan of Knock's command. There with great coolness. was the beef and mutton on the braes, the fresh and The copper nose of the gracious Duncan now be. salt-water fish in the lochs, the brooks, and frith; came heated like the bull of Phalaris, and while Mr. game of every kind, from the deer to the leveret, were Archibald mediated betwixt the offended parties, and to be had for the killing, in the Duke's forests, moors, the attention of the company was engaged by their heaths, and mosses; and for liquor, home-brewed ale disputc, Butler took an opportunity to effect his ro flowed as freely, as water; brandy and usquebaugh treat. both were had in those happy times without duty; He found the females at Auchingower, very anxious even white wine and claret were got for nothing, for the breaking up of the convivial party; for it was since the Duke's extensive rights of admiralty, gave a part of the arrangement, that although David Deans him a title to all the wine in cask which is drifted was to remain at Auchingower, and Butler was that ashore on the western coast and isles of Scotland, night to take possession of the Manse, yet Jeanie, for when shipping have suffered by severe weather, In whom complete accommodations were not yet proshor, as Duncan boasted, the entertainment did not vided in her father's house, was to return for a day or cost Mac Callummore a plack out of his sporran, and two to the Lodge at Roseneath, and the boats

had was nevertheless not only liberal, but overflowing. been held in readiness accordingly. They waited,

The Duke's health was solemnized in a bona fide therefore, for Knockdunder's return, but twilighi bumper, and David Deans himself added perhaps the came, and they still waited in vain. At length Mr. first huzza that his lungs had ever uttered, to swell Archibald, who, as a man of decorum, had taken care the shout with which the pledge was received. Nay, not to exceed in his conviviality, made his appear. so exalted in heart was he upon this memorable occa- ance, and advised the females strongly to return to sion, and so much disposed to be indulgent, that he the island under his escort ; observirrs, that, from the expressed no dissatisfaction when three bagpipers humour in which he had left the Captain, it was a struck up, "The Campbells are coming." The health great chance whether he budged out of the publicof the reverend minister of Knocktarlitie was received house that night, and it was absolutely certain that with similar honours; and there was a roar of laugh- he would not be very fit company for ladies. The ter, when one of his brethren slyly subjoined the addi- was at their disposal, he said, and there was suf tion of, "A good wife to our brother, to keep the Manse pleasant twiligḥt for a party on the water. in order." On this occasion David Deans was deli- Jeanie, who had considerable confidence in Archi vered of his first-born joke ; and apparently the par- bald's prudence, immediately acquiesced in this proturition was accompanied with many throes, for sorely posal; but Mrs. Dolly positively objected to the small did he twist about his physiognomy, and much did he boat. If the big boat could be goiten, she agreed to stumble in his speech, before he could express his idea, set out, otherwise she would sleep on the floor, rather "That the lad' being now wedded to his spiritual than stir a step: Reasoning with Dolly was out of bride, it was hard to threaten him with ane temporal the question, and Archibald did not think the difficulty spouse in the same day." He then laughed a hoarse so pressing as to require compulsion. He observed, and brief laugh, and was suddenly grave and silent, it was not using the Captain very politely to deprive as if abashed at his own vivacious effort.

him of his coach and six; "but as it was in the laAfter another toast or two, Jeanie, Mrs. Dolly, and dies' service," he gallantly said, "he would use so such of the female natives as had honoured the feast much freedom-besides, the gig would serve the Cape with their presence, retired to David's new dwelling Itain's purpose better, as it could come off at any hour

of the tide; the large boat should, therefore, be at lancholy reflections, a shadowy figure seemed to den Mrs. Dolly's service.

tach itself from the copsewood on her right hand, They walked to the beach accordingly, accompa- Jeanie started, and the stories of apparitions and nied by Butler. It was some time before the boatmen wraiths, seen by solitary travellers in wild situations, could be assembled, and ere they were well embarked, at such times, and in such an hour, suddenly came and ready to depart, the pale moon was come over full upon her imagination. The figure glided on, and the hill, and finging a trembling reflection on the as it came betwixt her and the moon, she was aware broad and glittering waves. But go soft and pleasant that it had the appearance of a woman. A soft voice was the night, that Butler, in bidding farewell to twice repeated, *Jeanie-Jeanie!"-Was it indeed Jeanie, had no apprehension for her safely; and, what could it be the voice of her sister ?-Was she still is yet more extraordinary, Mrs. Dolly felt no alarm among the living, or had the grave given up its tefor her own. The air was soft, and came over the nant?--Ere she could state these questions to her cooling wave with something of summer fragrance. own mind, Effie, alive, and in the body, nad clasped The beautiful scene of headlands, and capes, and bays, her in her arms, and was straining her to her bosom, around them, with the broad blue chain of mountains, and devouring her wiin kisses. "I have wandered were dimly visible in the moonlight; while every dash here,” she said, " like a ghaisl, to see you, and nae of the oars made the waters glance and sparkle with wonder you take me for ane-I thought but to see the brilliant phenomenon called the sea-fire.

you gang by, or to hear the sound of your voice; but This last circumstance filled Jeanie with wonder, to speak to yourself again, Jeanie, was mair than 1 and served 10 amuse the mind of her companion, until deserved, and mair than I durst pray for." they approached the little bay, which seemed to "O, Effie! how came ye here alone, and at this stretch its dark and wooded arms into the sea as if to hour, and on the wild sea-beach ?-Are you sure it's Welcome them.

your ain living sell ?" The usual landing place was at a quarter of a mile's There was something of Effie's former humour in distance from the Lodge, and although the tide did her practically answering the question by a gentle not admit of the large boat coming quite close to the pinch, more beseeming the fingers of a fairy than of jetty of loose stones which served as a pier, Jeanie, a ghost. And again the sisters embraced, and laughwho was both bold and active, easily sprung ashore; ed, and wept by turns. but Mrs. Dolly positively refusing to commit herself But ye maun gang up wi' me to the Lodge, Effie," to the same risk, the complaisani Mr. Archibald or- said Jeanie, "and tell me a' your story-1

hae gude dered the boat round to a more regular landing-place, folk there that will make ye welcome for my sake." at a considerable distance along the shore. He then "Na, na, Jeanie," replied her sister sorrowfully, prepared to land himself

, that he might, in the mean-"ye hae forgotten whai I am--a banished outlawed while, accompany Jeanie to the Lodge. But as there creature, scarce escaped the gallows by your being was no mistaking the woodland lane, which led from the bauldest and the best sister that ever lived-1'l thence to the shore, and as the moonlight showed her gae near nane o' your grand friends, even if there was one of the white chimneys

rising out of the wood nae danger to me.' which embosomed the building, Jeanie declined this There is nae danger--there shall be nae danger," favour with thanks, and requested him to proceed said Jeanie eagerly. "O, Effie, dinna be wilful-be with Mrs. Dolly, who, being in a country where the guided for anes--we will be sae happy a' thegither!". ways were strange to her, had mair need of counte- "I have a' the happiness I deserve on this side of

the grave, now that I hae seen you," answered Efño; This, indeed, was a fortunate circumstance, and * and whether there were danger to mysell or no, might even be said to save poor Cowslip's life, if il naebody shall ever say that I come with my cheat. was true, as she herself used solemnly to aver, tha: the-gallows face to shame my sister amang her she must positively have expired for fear, if she had grand friends." been left alone in the boat with six wild Highlanders "I hae nae grand friends," said Jeanie; "nae in kilts.

friends but what are friends of yours-Reuben Butler The night was so exquisitely beautiful, that Jeanie, and my father.-0, unhappy lassie, dinna be dour, instead of immediately directing her course towards and turn your back on your happiness again! We the Lodge, stood looking after the boat as it again put wunna see another acquaintance-Come hame to us, off from the side, and rowed out into the little bay, the yourain dearest friends-it's better sheltering under an dark figures of her companions growing less and less auld hedge than under a new-planted wood." distinct as they diminished in the distance, and the "It's in vain speaking, Jeanie--I maun drink as I jorram, or melancholy boat song of the rowers, com; hae brewed-I am married, and I maun follow my ing on the ear with softened and sweeter sound, until husband for better for worse." the boat rounded the headland, and was lost to her Married, Effie!" exclaimed Jeanie" Misfortida observation.

nate creature! and to that awfu'Still Jeanie remained in the same posture looking "Hush, hush," said Effie, clapping one hand on out upon the sea. It would, she was aware, be some her mouth, and pointing to the thicket with the other, time ere her companions could reach the Lodge, as “he is yonder.". the distance by the more convenient landing-place She said this in a tone which showed that her huswas considerably greater than from the point where band had found means to inspire her with awe, as she stood, and she was not sorry to have an opportu- well as affection. At this moment a man issued nity to spend the interval by herself.

from the wood. The wonderful change which a few weeks had It was young Staunton. Even by the imperfect wrought in her situation, from shame and grief, and light of the moon, Jeanie could observe that he was almost despair, to honour, joy, and a fair prospect of handsomely dressed, and had the aw of a person of future happiness, passed before her eyes with a sensa- rank, tion which brought the tears into them. Yet they "Effie," he said, ' our time is wellnigh spent-the Rowed at the same time from another source. As skiff *-!l be aground in the creek, and i dare

not stay human happiness is never perfect, and as well-con- longer.--I hope your sister will allow me to saluie. structed minds are never more sensible of the dis- her ? But Jeanie shrunk back froin him with a tresses of those whom they love, than when their feeling of internal abhorrence. "Well," he said, "il own situation forms a contrast with them, Jeanie's does not much signify; if you keep up the feeling of affectionate regrets turned to the fate of her poor șis- ill-will, at least you do not act upon it, and I thank ler-the child of so many hopes-the fondled nursling you for your respect to my secret, when a word of so many years-now an exile, and, what was (which in your place I would have spoken at once worse, dependant on the will of a mạn, of whose ha. would have cost me my life. People say, you should bits she had every reason to entertain the worst opi- keep from the wife of your bosom the secret that connion, and who, even in his strongest paroxysms of cerns your neck-my wife and her sister both know.. remorse, had appeared 10 much a stranger to the mine, and I shall noi sleep a wink the less souna. feelings of real penitence.

“But are you really married to my sister, sir," asked. While her thoughts were occunied with these me-Jeanie, in great douba and anxiety's for the haughty Vol. III.

K

nance."

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change-house, and if we dinna mend our pace, we'll at Auchingower, and left the gentlemen to their pota come short at meal-time."

Hons. David accompanied his friend without answer; but The feast procecded with great glee. The converbegan to feel from experience, that the glen of Knock- sation, where Duncan had it under his direction, was tarlitie, like the rest of the world, was haunted by its not indeed always strictly canonical, but David Deans own special subjects of regret and discontent. His escaped any risk of being scandalized, by engaging mind was so much occupied by considering the best with one of his neighbours in a recapinlation of the means of converting Duncan of Knock to a sense of sufferings of Ayrshire and Lanarkshire, during what reverent decency during public worship, that he alto- was called the invasion of the Highland Host; the gether forgot to inquire, whether Butler was called prudent Mr. Mciklehose cautioning them from time to upon to subscribe the oaths to government.

time to lower their voices, for that "Duncan Knock's Some have insinuated, that his neglect on this head father had been at that onslaught, and brought back was, in some degree, intentional; but I think this ex- muckle gude plenishing, and that Duncan was no planation inconsistent with the simplicity of my unlikely to hae been there himself, for what he friend David's character. Neither have I ever been kend." able, by the most minute enquiries, to know whether Meanwhile, as the mirth grew fast and furious, the che formula, at which he so much scrupled, had been graver members of the party began to escape as well exacted from Butler, aye or no. The books of the as they could. David Deans accomplished his retrean, kirk-session might have thrown some light on this and Butler anxiously watched an opportunity to fol matter; but unfortunately they were destroyed in the low him. Knockdunder

, however, desirous, he said, year 1746, by one Donacha phu na Dunaigh, at the of knowing what stuff was in the new minister, had instance, it was said, or at least by the connivance, no intention to part with him so easily, but kept him of the gracious Duncan of Knock, who had a desire pinned to his side, watching him sedulously, and with 10 obliterate the recorded foibles of a certain Kate obliging violence filing his glass to the brim, as often Finlayson.

as he could seize an opportunity of doing so. At length, as the evening was wearing late, a venerable

brother chanced to ask Mr. Archibald when they CHAPTER XLVI.

might hope to see the Duke, tam carum caput, as he

would venture to term him, at the Lodge of Rose Now butt and ben the change-house fills

neath. Duncan of Knock, whose ideas were some Wi' yill-coup commentators,

what conglomerated, and who, it may be believed, Here's crying out for bakes and gills,

was no great scholar, catching up some imperfeci And there the pint-stoup clatters. Wi' thick and thrang, and loud and lang,

sound of the words, conceived the speaker was draw. Wi' logic and wil scripture,

ing a parallel between the Duke and Sir Donald They raise a din that in the end

Gorme of Sleat; and being of opinion that such comIs like to breed a rupture, 6 wrath that day.-BURNS.

parison was odious, snorted thrice, and prepared him.

self to be in a passion. A PLEXTIFUL entertainment, at the Duke of Ar

To the explanation of the venerable divine the Capgyle's cost, regaled the reverend gentlemen who had tain answered, “I heard the word Gorme myself, sir, assisted at the ordination of Reuben Butler, and almost with my ain ears. D'ye think I do not know Gaelic all the respectable part of the parish. The feast was, from Latin ?" indeed, such as the country itself furnished; for plenty

. Apparently not, sir;"'-so the clergyman, offend. of all the requisites for "a rough and round" dinner ed in his turn, and taking a pinch of snuff, answered were always at Duncan of Knock's command. There with great coolness. was the beef and mutton on the braes, the fresh and The copper nose of the gracious Duncan now besalt-water fish in the lochs, the brooks, and frith; came heated like the bull of Phalaris, and while Mr. game of every kind, from the deer to the leveret, were Archibald mediated betwixt the offended parties, and to be had for the killing, in the Duke's forests, moors, the attention of the company was engaged by their heaths, and mosses; and for liquor, home-brewed ale disputc, Butler took an opportunity to effect his re flowed as freely, as water; brandy and usquebaugh treat. both were had in those happy times without duty; He found the females at Auchingower, very anxious even white wine and claret were got for nothing, for the breaking up of the convivial party; for it was since the Duke's extensive rights of admiralty, gave a part of the arrangement, that although David Deans him a title to all the wine in cask which is drifted was to remain at Auchingower, and Butler was that ashore on the western coast and isles of Scotland, night to take possession of the Manse, yet Jeame, for when shipping have suffered by severe weather. In whom complete accommodations were not yet proshors, as Duncan boasted, the entertainment did not vided in her father's house, was to return for a day or cost Mac Callummore a plack out of his sporran, and two to the Lodge at Roseneath, and the boats had was nevertheless not only liberal, but overflowing. been held in readiness accordingly. They waited,

The Duke's health was solemnized in a bona fide therefore, for Knockdunder's return, but twilighi bumper, and David Deans himself added perhaps the came, and they still waited in vain. At length Mr. first huzza that his lungs had ever uttered, to swell Archibald, who, as a man of decorum, had taken care the shout with which the pledge was received. Nay, not to exceed in his conviviality, made his appearso exalted in heart was he upon this memorable occa- ance, and advised the females strongly to return to sion, and so much disposed to be indulgent, that he the island under his escort ; observiirg, that, from the expressed no dissatisfaction when three bagpipers humour in which he had left the Captain, it was a struck up, "The Campbells are coming." The health great chance whether he budged out of the publicof the reverend minister of Knocktarlitie was received house that night, and it was absolutely certain that with similar honours; and there was a roar of laugh he would not be very fit company

for ladies. The

gir ter, when one of his brethren slyly subjoined the addi- was at their disposal, he said, and there was stif tion of

, "A good wife to our brother, to keep the Manse pleasant twilight for a party on the water. in order.' On this occasion David Deans was deli- Jeanie, who had considerable confidence in Arch vered of his first-born joke ; and apparently the par- bald's prudence, immediately acquiesced in this pro turition was accompanied with many throes, for sorely | posal; but Mrs. Dolly positively objected to the small did he twist about his physiognomy, and much did he boat. If the big boat could be goiten, she agreed to stumble in his speech, before he could express his idea, set out, otherwise she would sleep on the floor, rather "That the lad" þeing now wedded to his spiritual than stir a step: Reasoning with Dolly was out of bride, it was hard to threaten him with ane temporal the qnestion, and Archibald did not think the difficulty spouse in the same day.” He then laughed a hoarse so pressing as to require compulsion. He observed, and brief laugh, and was suddenly grave and silent, it was not using the Captain very politely to deprive as if abashed at his own vivacious effort.

him of his coach and six; "but as it was in the laAfter another toast or two, Jeanie, Mrs. Dolly, and dies service," he gallantly said, "he would use so such of the female natives as had honoured the feast much freedom-besides, the gig would serve the Cape with their presence, retired to David's new dwelling tain's purpose better, as it could come off at any bocr of the tide; the large boat should, therefore, be at lancholy reflections, a shadowy figure seemed to den Mrs. Dolly's service.

tach itself from the copsewood on her right hand, They walked to the beach accordingly, accompa- Jeanie started, and the stories of apparitions and nied by Butler. It was some time before the

boatinen wraiths, seen by solitary travellers in wild situations, could be assembled, and ere they were well embarked, at such times, and in such an hour, suddenly came and ready to depart, the pale moon was come over full upon her imagination. The figure glided on, and the hill, and Ainging a trembling reflection on the as it came betwixi her and the moon, she was aware broad and glittering waves. But so soft and pleasant that it had the appearance of a woman. A soft voice was the night, that Butler, in bidding farewell to twice repeated, *Jeanie-Jeanie!"-Was it indeed Jeanie, had no apprehension for her safety; and, what could it be the voice of her sister ?--Was she still is yet more extraordinary, Mrs. Dolly felt no alarm among the living, or had the grave given up its tefor her own. The air was soft, and came over the nanti-Ere_she could state these questions to her cooling wave with something of summer fragrance. own mind, Effie, alive, and in the body, nad clasped The beautiful scene of headlands, and capes, and bays, her in her arms, and was straining her to her bosom, around them, with the broad blue chain of mountains, and devouring her wiin kisses. I have wandered were dimly visible in the moonlight; while every dash here,” she said, " like a ghaisl, to see you, and nae of the oars made the waters glance and sparkle with wonder you take me for ane--- I thought but to see the brilliant phenomenon called the sea-fire.

you gang by, or to hear the sound of your voice; but This last circumstance filled Jeanie with wonder, to speak to yourself again, Jeanie, was mair than 1 and served to amuse the mind of her companion, until deserved, and mair than I durst pray for." they approached the little bay, which seemed to "O, Effie! how came ye here alone, and at this stretch its dark and wooded arms into the sea as if to hour, and on the wild sea-beach ?--Are you sure it's welcome them.

your ain living sell ?" The usual landing-place was at a quarter of a mile's There was something of Effie's former humour in distance from the Lodge, and although the tide did her practically answering the question by a gentle not admit of the large boat coming quite close to the pinch, more beseeming the fingers of a fairy than of jetty of loose stones which served as a pier, Jeanie, a ghost. And again the sisters embraced, and laughwho was both bold and active, easily sprung ashore; ed, and wept by turns. but Mrs. Dolly positively refusing to commit herself But ye maun gang up wi' me to the Lodge, Effie,' to the same risk, the complaisani Mr. Archibald or- said Jeanie, "and tell me a' your story-1 hae gude dered the boat round to a more regular landing-place, folk there that will make ye welcome for my sake." at a considerable distance along the shore. He then Na, na, Jeanie," replied her sister sorrowfully, prepared to land himself, that he might, in the mean-"ye hae forgotten whai I am--a banished outlawed while, accompany Jeanie to the Lodge. But as there creature, scarce escaped the gallows by your being was no mistaking the woodland lane, which led from the bauldest and the best sister that ever lived --I'll thence to the shore, and as the moonlight showed her gae near nane o' your grand friends, even if there was one of the white chimneys rising out of the wood nae danger to me.' which embosomed the building, Jeanie declined this There is nae danger--there shall be nae danger," favour with thanks, and requested him to proceed said Jeanie eagerly. "O, Effie, dinna be wilfu-be with Mrs. Dolly, who, being in a country where the guided for anes-we will be sae happy a' thegither!". ways were strange to her, had mair need of counte- "I have a' the happiness I deserve on this side of nance."

the grave, now that I hae seen you," answered Emo; This, indeed, was a fortunate circumstance, and “and whether there were danger to mysell or no, might even be said to save poor Cowslip's life, if it naebody shall ever say that I come with my cheat. was true, as she herself used solemnly to aver, tha; the-gallows face to shame my sister amang her she must positively have expired for fear, if she had grand friends." been left alone in the boat with six wild Highlanders "I hae nae grand friends," said Jeanie; "nae in kilts.

friends but what are friends of yours-Reuben Butler The night was so exquisitely beautiful, that Jeanie, and my father.-0, unhappy lassie, dinna be dour, instead of immediately directing her course towards and turn your back on your happiness again! We the Lodge, stood looking after the boat as it again put wunna see another acquaintance---Come hame to us, off from the side, and rowed out into the little bay, the your ain dearest friends-it's better sheltering under an dark figures of her companions growing less and less auld hedge than under a new-planted wood." distinct as they diminished in the distance, and the "It's in vain speaking, Jeanie--1 maun drink as I jorram, or melancholy boat song of the rowers, com hae brewed -I am married, and I maun follow my ing on the ear with softened and sweeter sound, until husband for better for worse. the boat rounded the headland, and was lost to her Married, Effie!" exclaimed Jeanic-"Misfortun observation.

nate creature! and to that awfu'Still Jeanie remained in the same posture looking Hush, hush,” said Effie, clapping one hand on out upon the sea. It would, she was aware, be some her mouth, and pointing to the thicket with the other, time ere her companions could reach the Lodge, as "he is yonder." the distance by the more convenient landing-place She said this in a tone which showed that her hus was considerably greater than from the point where band had found means to inspire her with awe, as she stood, and she was not sorry to have an opportu- well as affection. At this moment a man, issued nity to spend the interval by herself.

from the wood. The wonderful change which a few weeks had It was young Staunton. Even by the imperfect wrought in her situation, from shame and grief, and light of the moon, Jeanie could observe that he was almost despair, to honour, joy, and a fair prospect of handsomely dressed, and had the air of a person of future happiness, passed before her eyes with a sensa- rank, tion which brought the tears into them. Yet they "Effie,” he said, ' our time is wellnigh spent--the flowed at the same time from another source. As skiff --!! be aground in the creek, and I dare not stay human happiness is never perfect, and as well-con- longer.--I hope your sister will allow me to, salute. structed minds are never more sensible of the diş- her ? But Jeanie shrunk back frown him with a tresses of those whom they love, than when their feeling of internal abhorrence. "Well," he said, "ii own situation forms a contrast with them, Jeanie's does not much signify; if you keep up the feeling of affectionate regrets turned to the fate of her poor șis- ill-will, at least you do noi act upon it, and I thank ler--the child of so many hopes-the fondled nursling you for your respect to my secret, when a word of so many years-now an exile, and, what was (which in your place I would have spoken at once) worse, dependant on the will of a man, of whose ha would have cost me my life. People say, you should bits she had every reason to entertain the worst opi- keep from the wife of your bosom ihe secret that connion, and who, even in his strongest paroxysms of cerns your neck-my wife and her sister both know.. remorse, had appeared too much a stranger to the mine, and I shall noi sleep a wink the less sounu. feelings of real penitence.

“But are you really married to my sister, sir," asked. While her thoughts were occunied with these me-Jeanie, in great doubt and anxiety; for the haughly Vol. III.

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